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Historical Cooking Books – 49 in a series – Self Help Wartime Cooking Suggestions

March 22nd, 2020 No comments

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books – 49 in a series – Self Help Wartime Cooking Suggestions

Self Help Wartime Cooking Suggestions  with correction 0000

Self Help Wartime Cooking Suggestions  with correction 0001

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RATION HINTS.

1. To clarify fat for cooking:—

(a) Put into saucepan with plenty of water. Bring to the boil, then stand in a cool place till set. Lift out the set fat, scrape any sediment from the under side. All gravy and sediment will remain in saucepan.

(b) Melt fat and add a potato cut in quarters. When the potato is browned, and the fat stops bubbling, strain the fat through a double cheese cloth and store in a cool, dry place.

• • • •

Substitute for Whipped Cream.

2. Add a sliced banana to the white of an egg, and beat until very stiff. The banana will dissolve.

• • • •

Instead of Dry Toast.

To Those Who Like Their Bread Buttered Before It Is Toasted.

3. Did you ever try bacon dripping instead of the hard-to-get butter? Just spread it on lightly before toasting.

• • • •

How to Tell When a Cake is Done.

4. If layer cake pan is used, press very lightly on top of cake with flat of your finger. If the slight dent springs back, cake is done. If deep pan or loaf pan is used, insert a wire cake tester, or if you do not have one, a clean straw in centre of cake. If it comes out dry, without dough sticking to it, your cake is finished baking.

• • • •

To Save Sugar. . .

5. To save sugar add pinch of soda when stewing fruit.

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Historical Cooking Books – 48 in a series – Smiley’s cook book and universal household guide (1896)

March 8th, 2020 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 48 in a series – Smiley’s cook book and universal household guide (1896)

Historical Cooking Books - 48 in a series - Smiley's cook book and universal household guide (1896)

Historical Cooking Books - 48 in a series - Smiley's cook book and universal household guide (1896)

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PREFACE.

THE following pages are the result of many years of experi ment, investigation and study. We have aimed to prepare a work for the use of housekeepers on a more thorough and comprehensive plan than has been heretofore attempted. As the book is intended for the use of the average housekeeper, there is nothing in it which cannot be easily understood by any person of ordinary intelligence, for we have taken much pains to present the results of modern scientific investigations in a clear and simple way^ avoiding, as far as possible, the use of technical terms.

Most of the household books in current use give the processes for doing things merely, with no attempt to explain the I’easons for the processes or the principles which underlie them. We also give, as clearly as possible, the most detailed directions in all our recipes, but we do not stop there, as we think any one can work more intelli gently by understanding not only how to do a certain thing, but also ivhy it is done one way rather than another, and the principles which underlie the process. For this reason, throughout the work, we systematically explain principles as well as processes. We have long felt that a sad defect in most cook books is their utter failure to explain those simple, fundamental principles which every cook should, if possible, understand.’ If these principles are once thoroughly understood the mystery and uncertainty of kitchen operations will vanish, and cooking will simply be adopting certain clearly under stood methods to produce certain definite results, and success will always follow.

For years we have been gathering material for this book, resulting in the accumulation of a great mass of recipes. These have been tested and culled, and in making selections our rule has been to choose those which were most simple and economical, because the book is primarily designed for the use of the masses, whose means are always limited, and we aim to meet their every day wants, although we present also an ample number of more elaborate recipes suitable for special occasions. Our endeavor has been to make the collection as complete and comprehensive as possible, and to give new, choice, and well-tested recipes in every department of house hold cookery.

The “Time Tables for Cooking,” and also the “Time to Cook” given with recipes throughout the book, will be very convenient and helpful to our readers and this is a feature which is lacking in most other cook books. Its preparation has cost us much labor.

In the chapter on “Cake” we have adopted a new arrangement of the recipes, and used an exceptionally large and clear type which for practical kitchen use will be found a great convenience. The type used throughout the book is large, clear and new, and the ease with which it can be read will be appreciated by busy housewives.

The colored plates and numerous illustrations with which the book is embellished have required much labor and expense, and they will make many of the subjects much clearer than any wholly verbal de scription could possibly do.

In preparing this work we have constantly had four main objects in view. (1) To secure the fullest, latest, and most reliable informa tion possible on the subjects treated. (2) To explain processes and methods for saving time and labor, for the average housewife is sadly overworked and her time and strength are of the utmost value. (3) To select the best and most economical recipes; and (4) to point out ways to prevent waste.

In the general department of household topics we present a more complete and systematic treatment of the various subjects connected with household management than can be found elsewhere, and the information therein contained will certainly be of great practical value to housekeepers.

The effort of the editor has been to produce a thoroughly reliable and a plain and practical guide to housekeeping in all its branches, which no housewife can afford to do without.

The book has not been written by any one individual, but many pens have been employed more or less in its preparation.

The book will certainly shed much needed light on the problems which confront and often harass housekeepers, explain the funda mental principles which underlie their work, and present a mass of recipes which will materially aid them in their labors.

The Editor.



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Historical Cooking Books – 47 in a series – House and home : a complete housewife’s guide by Marion Harland (1889)

March 1st, 2020 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 47 in a series – House and home : a complete housewife’s guide by Marion Harland (1889)

Historical Cooking Books - 47 in a series - House and home : a complete housewife's guide by Mario Harland (1889)

Historical Cooking Books - 47 in a series - House and home : a complete housewife's guide by Mario Harland (1889)

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Historical Cooking Books – 46 in a series – The gastronomic regenerator (1849)

February 24th, 2020 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 46 in a series – The gastronomic regenerator (1849)

Historical Cooking Books - 46 in a series - The gastronomic regenerator (1849)Historical Cooking Books - 46 in a series - The gastronomic regenerator (1849)

Historical Cooking Books - 46 in a series - The gastronomic regenerator (1849)Historical Cooking Books - 46 in a series - The gastronomic regenerator (1849) 0016

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Preface

 

At the request of several persons of distinction, who have visited the Reform Club, — particularly the ladies, to whom I have always made it a rule never to refuse anything in my power, for indeed it must have been the fair sex who have had the majority in this domestic argument to gain this gastronomical election, — Why do you not write and publish a Cookery-book ? was a question continually put to me. Tor a considerable time this scientific word caused a thrill of horror to pervade my frame, and brought back to my mind that one day, being in a most superb library in the midst of a splendid baronial hall, by chance I met with one of Milton’s allegorical works, the profound ideas of Locke, and several chefs-d’oeuvre of one of the noblest champions of literature, Shakspeare ; when all at once my attention was attracted by the nineteenth edition of a voluminous work : such an immense success of publication caused me to say, ” Oh ! you celebrated man, posterity counts every hour of fame upon your regretted ashes !”

 



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We Tried 6 Methods of Caramelizing Onions and Found a Clear Winner via Kitchn

February 18th, 2020 Comments off
 
Even though I’ve been cooking personally and professionally for more than a decade, perfectly caramelized onions have always been elusive. This is probably because I’m extremely impatient, and as Slate once famously pointed out, many recipes lie about just how long it really takes to achieve true caramelization (doing it in five minutes is not a thing).
 
Despite that, there is no end to the methods that claim to make the task faster or easier. I was determined to try as many methods as I could find. After some careful research, I found six that looked interesting: a basic stovetop method from Bon Appétit, a quicker (15-minute) method from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt, a slow cooker method from the Pioneer Woman, an oven-roasted method from Food Network, an Instant Pot method from Martha Stewart, and finally a stovetop method from Cooks Illustrated that suggested using a little baking soda.

Historical Cooking Books – 45 in a series – New York World’s Fair cook book: the American kitchen (1939) by Crosby Gaige

February 9th, 2020 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 45 in a series – New York World’s Fair cook book: the American kitchen by Crosby Gaige

Historical Cooking Books - 45 in a series - New York World's Fair cook book: the American kitchen by Crosby GaigeHistorical Cooking Books - 45 in a series - New York World's Fair cook book: the American kitchen by Crosby Gaige

Historical Cooking Books - 45 in a series - New York World's Fair cook book: the American kitchen by Crosby GaigeHistorical Cooking Books - 45 in a series - New York World's Fair cook book: the American kitchen by Crosby Gaige

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Preface

The association of good food and fairs is traditional in America, its roots going back to the very beginnings of the country to the first live stock fairs held in agricultural communities. At these gatherings of the farming and village gentry there was a seemly display of American food on the hoof, in the raw so to speak. Fine hogs, little lambs that went baa-a, handsome cattle, proud and dignified, chickens, ducks, geese and turkeys, prize pumpkins, rosy apples, superb cabbages — shown, to be sure, not so much as prospective edibles to the admiring throng gath ered around them, but as examples of what the well-stocked farm should have as starters. Progenitors of a nation’s food supply were these displays. Incidentally some of the best things ever eaten by man were carried to these fairs in the basket lunches of the farm wives and vil lagers of the day.

From crossroads fairs we progressed to county and state fairs, and now in 1939 comes the greatest fair the land has ever known — an inter national exhibition representative of every industry and art in our broad continent and reflecting at the same time the arts and industries of nearly every country of the rest of the world.

Now since the character of our fairs has been expanded so widely there, nevertheless, is still an occasion for food to be discussed in rela tion to such an event. I doubt if there will be many basket lunches carried to the New York World’s Fair of 1939. Certainly there will be no need for such burdens, no matter how savory the contents, be cause to feed the hungry thousands who will attend there are distin guished restaurants set up, staffed and operated by foreign exhibitors, with their native dishes superbly cooked by native chefs. And of course, in addition, there will be many American restaurants on the grounds of the New York fair, not to mention the several thousands of tearooms, restaurants, hotel dining rooms and cafes of Manhattan which always function and which will be especially on their toes to appeal to the vis itors of the fair. Basket luncheons indeed!

Just the same, this occasion calls to mind those old-time baskets over flowing with the delicious simples of our early kitchens. And to those good housewives of bygone days whose arts of the kitchen were the forerunners of our modern cookery, I present my gratitude. No attempt has been made in this collection to present a uniform cook book in the pattern of the standard volumes usually prepared. This is a selection of recipes from the six geographical sections of the United States ; count less delicious dishes had to be omitted from each section, for one reason or another, but it is hoped that the most typical and characteristic dishes of each are included. Or if they are so similar to famous dishes of another state, as is often the case, then to avoid repetition they are omitted and other local favorites stressed.

Here is American cookery from coast to coast, and here, too, are some of the dishes you will eat when you visit the World of Tomorrow as it is depicted by the imagination and engineering and skill of those who planned the New York World’s Fair of 1939.

March 1, 1939.



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Historical Cooking Books – 44 in a series – The London art of cookery and housekeeper’s complete assistant by John Farley (1789)

January 28th, 2020 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 44 in a series –  The London art of cookery and housekeeper’s complete assistant : on a new plan, made plain and easy to the understanding of every housekeeper, cook, and servant in the kingdom : containing proper directions for the choice of all kinds of provisions, instructions for trussing poultry, roasting and boiling all sorts of butchers meat, poultry, game, and fish, baking, broiling and frying sauces for every occasion, soups, broths, stews, and hashes, ragoos and fricassees, made dishes, both plain and elegant, all sorts of pies and puddings, pancakes and fritters, proper instructions for dressing fruits and vegetables, pickling, potting, and preserving, the preparation of hams, tongues, and bacon, to keep garden stuffs and fruits in perfection, the whole art of confectionary, the preparation of sugars, tarts, puffs, and pasties , cakes, custards, jams, and jellies, drying, candying, and preserving fruits, &c. elegant ornaments for entertainments, instructions for carving, necessary articles for sea-faring persons, made wines, cordial waters, and malt liquors : to which is added, an appendix, containing considerations on culinary poisons, directions for making broths, &c. for the sick, a list of things in season in the different months of the year, marketing tables, &c. &c. : embellished with a head of the author, and a bill of fare for every month in the year, elegantly engraved on thirteen copper-plates
by John Farley

by John Farley

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Historical Cooking Books – 43 in a series – Cups and their customs by George Edwin Roberts (1863)

January 19th, 2020 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 43 in a series – Cups and their customs by George Edwin Roberts (1863)

Historical Cooking Books - 43 in a series - Cups and their customs by  George Edwin Roberts (1863)

Historical Cooking Books - 43 in a series - Cups and their customs by  George Edwin Roberts (1863)

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PREPACE.

The principal object of these pages is to furnisli a collection of recipes for the brewing of com- pound drinks, technically termed ” Cups/’ all of which have been selected with the most scrupu- lous attention to the rules of gastronomy, and their virtues tested and approved by repeated trials. These we are inclined to put into type, from a belief that, if they were more generally adopted, it would be the means of getting rid of a great deal of that stereotyped drinking which at present holds sway at the festive boards of England. In doing this, we have endeavoured to simplify the matter as much as possible, adding such hints and remarks as may prove serviceable to the uninitiated, whilst we have discarded a goodly number of modern com- pounds as unpalatable and unscientific. As, in this age of progress, most things are raised to the position of a science, we see no reason why

Bacclianology (if the term please our readers) should not hold a respectable place, and be entitled to its due mead of praise ; so, by way of introduction, we have ventured to take a cursory glance at the customs which have been attached to drinking from the earliest periods to the present time. This, however, we set forth as no elaborate history, but only as an arrange- ment of such scraps as have from time to time fallen in our way, and have helped us to form ideas of the social manners of bygone times.

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Historical Cooking Books – 42 in a series – Christmas recipes by Anna Lee Scott

December 1st, 2019 Comments off

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Historical Cooking Books – 42 in a series – Christmas recipes by Anna Lee Scott

Historical Cooking Books - 42 in a series - Christmas recipes by Anna Lee Scott

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Christmas Dinner Menu No. 1

FRUIT-JUICE COCKTAIL
ROAST STUFFED TURKEY, CHICKEN OR VEAL
GIBLET OR MILK GRAVY
CRANBERRY JELLY BREAD SAUCE
RICED OR MASHED POTATOES
CREAMED CAULIFLOWER BAKED SQUASH
MINCE PIE CHEESE
COFFEE
FRUIT NUTS MINTS



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! † Available from the LA Public Library

Historical Cooking Books – 41 in a series – The Boston Cooking School magazine of culinary science and domestic economics (1899)

November 25th, 2019 Comments off


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Historical Cooking Books – 41 in a series – The Boston Cooking School magazine of culinary science and domestic economics (1899)

Historical Cooking Books - 40 in a series - The Boston Cooking School magazine of culinary science and domestic economics (1899)

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THE UNTRAINED HAND.
A Study in Household Economics.
By Emma P. Ewing.

Of all the young women who have come under my instruction, as a teacher of household economics, not more than one in each twenty-five could sweep properly. And, as far as my observation extends, along domestic lines, this ratio will hold about the same in regard to women generally. As a rule, women, old or young, do not know how to hold a broom. When a woman takes hold of a broom, she places the right hand near the top of the handle and the left hand toward the broomcorn ; and, instead of changing and reversing her hands, as occasion requires, she keeps them in the same position during the entire time she is engaged in sweeping. Whether she sweeps to the right or to the left, the position of her hands remains unchanged, and her body is contorted and her muscles strained in a performance that would exercise those organs beneficially, if the hands were so trained that they could be used at will, and were changed as the changes in the position of the sweeper demanded.

 



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! † Available from the LA Public Library