Video: Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) – Van Nuys, CA – September 26, 2013

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Silent footage of the Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) taken September 26, 2013 in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles, California.

Previous footage of the Cooper’s Hawk can be found here

Music: “Tranquility” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License

 Coopers hawk

 

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“In the garden…” is a series for A Gardener’s Notebook highlighting what is happening in my garden, my friend’s gardens and California gardens throughout the seasons.

Interesting Plant: Symphyotrichum oblongifolius (Purple Aster)

Interesting Plant: Symphyotrichum oblongifolius (Purple Aster)

Purple aster

Discovered via Pinterest User, Jennifer Coots

I see these asters here in the neighborhood every year, although I don’t have any of my own. That said, it would fit the purple and gold theme in the front garden quite well. I love purple in almost all its shades, so it would be a pleasant addition.

Looking back on oner plants I have highlighted here in Interesting Plants, I wonder if pairing this with some of the “black” flowers mentioned earlier would be interesting. Hmmmm….

Symphyotrichum oblongifolium (Aromatic Aster) is a species of Aster native to parts of eastern and central United States. It is found in parts of Kansas,[1]Ohio, northern Illinois, hilly parts of southern Illinois, and on the banks of the Mississippi River and Illinois River,[2] as well as other parts of the central United States, for example, in Missouri and other places including along the Ohio River,[3] from Pennsylvania to Nebraska to Minnesota to Virginia.[4] It is an uncommon herbaceousperennial.[5]” —  Wikipedia

More information on Hemerocallis ‘Derrick Cane’ (Daylily):

From Amazon.com:

   
 
Asters from Amazon.com:

  

Previously in the Interesting Plant series: 

Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Video: In the garden…September 21, 2013: Deadheading the roses, and talk about fences and power lines

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** The sweet potatoes and roses are doing fine, but what has happened to all our new seedings? Heat, raccoons, squirrels and more!

We deadhead some roses, check out other rose blooms and talk about power lines and fences.

Check out what was happening in the garden a year ago: “Troy-Bilt TBC57 Cultivator Review for A Gardener’s Notebook

Check out my collection of gardening essays, “From A Gardener’s Notebook” now available as a Kindle eBook. (You don’t need a Kindle to read it, though. Read it on your PC, Link: http://j.mp/fagnbook

 

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Watch all past episodes of “In the garden…” in this YouTube Playlist


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“In the garden…” is a series for A Gardener’s Notebook highlighting what is happening in my garden, my friend’s gardens and California gardens throughout the seasons.

Container Garden Update 41: Pots are filling up, radishes go to seed and time to harvest

The watering system is making everything come alive. The radishes bolt in the high heat and it is time to harvest some oregano and peppermint for drying.

See what was happening in the container garden last year at this time: Container Garden Update 6 

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Garden Vocabulary: Parterre

Garden Vocabulary LogoParterre gardens, with their air of formality, aren’t for everyone, but I would guess it is one of the most popular garden styles even today, long after its first invention. Today’s gardens, especially here in the US, tend to lean towards more casual styles, but you will see elements of the parterre garden style in nearly every garden. It might only be a lightly clipped hedge or a stone walkway, but the elements seem to be part of our basic garden vocabulary.

What can you share about this Garden Vocabulary entry? Help educate us all in the comments!

Garden Vocabulary: Parterre

parterre is a formal garden constructed on a level surface, consisting of planting beds arranged to form a pleasing, usually symmetrical pattern, with gravel paths laid between. The beds are edged in stone or tightly clipped hedging and need not contain any flowers. French parterres originated in 15th-century gardens of the French Renaissance, such as the Chateau of Versailles, and were elaborated out of 16th-century Baroque garden à la française knot gardens, and reached a climax at Versailles and its many European imitators, such asKensington Palace in London.

The parterre was developed in France by Claude Mollet, the founder of a dynasty of nurserymen-designers that lasted deep into the 18th century. His inspiration in developing the 16th-century patterned compartimens—simple interlaces formed of herbs, either open and infilled with sand or closed and filled with flowers—was the painter Etienne du Pérac, who returned from Italy to the château of Anet, where he and Mollet were working. About 1595 Mollet introduced compartment-patterned parterres to royal gardens at Saint-Germain-en-Laye andFontainebleau; the fully developed scrolling embroidery-like parterres en broderie appear for the first time in Alexandre Francini’s engraved views of the revised planting plans at Fontainebleau and Saint-Germain-en-Laye in 1614.[1]” — Wikipedia

 
 St Fagans Castle and Gardens - 12
A parterre garden in St. Fagans, Cardiff, UK
 
More information on Sepal:
 
Previously on Garden Vocabulary:

This Garden Vocabulary series seeks to introduce and explain to you — and in many cases, myself — words and terms associated with gardening. Please let me know if  there are any terms you would like me to explore. You can leave your ideas in the comments section and we can learn together!

Interesting Plant: Hemerocallis ‘Derrick Cane’ (Daylily)

Interesting Plant: Hemerocallis ‘Derrick Cane’ (Daylily)

Daylily derrick cane

Discovered via Pinterest User, Tams Christoph

Another dark — almost black — flower. I don’t’ know what attracts me to these dark colors, but I do love them in almost any variety of plant. It may be because they are so striking in contrast to the sunlit garden and green foliage surrounding them. That and the fact that they are just so different than other flowers in the garden.

Daylily is the general nonscientific name of a species, hybrid or cultivar of the genus Hemerocallis /ˌhɛmɨrˈkælɪs/.[1] Daylily cultivar flowers are highly diverse in colour and form, as a result of hybridization efforts of gardening enthusiasts and professional horticulturalists. Thousands of registered cultivars are appreciated and studied by local and international Hemerocallis societies.[2] Hemerocallis is now placed in family Xanthorrhoeaceae, subfamily Hemerocallidoideae, and formerly was part of Liliaceae (which includes true lilies).” —  Wikipedia

More information on Hemerocallis ‘Derrick Cane’ (Daylily):

From Amazon.com:

 
 
Other Daylilies from Amazoin.com:
 
 

Previously in the Interesting Plant series: 

Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Horticulture/Garden Jobs Available – Search by location and keyword

Check out our list of horticulture jobs (and others) available via SimplyHired.com.

Enter your location for jobs close to you. You can also search on other keywords.

Horticulture jobs

Event: Plant Sale and Garden Boutique Fundraiser – Sunday. September 15, 2013 – Noon until 3pm

This event is being hosted by some friends and docents from the Los Angeles Zoo. If you like gardening, and helping out a great cause, stop by and check it out. — Douglas

Elka plant sale

Plants for Pongos!!

Orangutans eat plants, we sell plants.

The Great Ape Keeper Team, Docents, Volunteers, and Staff of the Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens are raising funds to host the 7th Annual Orangutan Species Survival Plan Husbandry Workshop in October. This is an honor for our Zoo and an excellent learning opportunity for Orangutan experts the world over. We hope you will help support this important project!

(Click the picture to the left for a full sized flyer)


Plant Sale and Garden Boutique

Sunday, September 15th – noon to 3:00

536 North June Street, Hancock Park, Los Angeles, CA 90004 [Map]

Succulents, perennials, patio plants & lots more Garden art and gifts Reasonable prices!

Information: Jan Richards, Docent Chair, Greater Los Angeles Zoo Ass’n. 323-644-4702 or jrichards@lazoo.org

Video: In the garden…September 11, 2013: Roses, sweet potatoes and our missing seedlings

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** The sweet potatoes and roses are doing fine, but what has happened to all our new seedings? Heat, raccoons, squirrels and more!

Check out my collection of gardening essays, “From A Gardener’s Notebook” now available as a Kindle eBook. (You don’t need a Kindle to read it, though. Read it on your PC, Link: http://j.mp/fagnbook

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Watch all past episodes of “In the garden…” in this YouTube Playlist


Please Like this video and/or subscribe to my channel on YouTube.

Your likes and subscriptions directly reflect how many other viewers are suggested this video.

 

“In the garden…” is a series for A Gardener’s Notebook highlighting what is happening in my garden, my friend’s gardens and California gardens throughout the seasons.

#gardenchat tonight at 6pm PDT/9pm EDT – Join us!

#GardenChat is a weekly, online, Twitter chat about all things gardening!