Historical Seed Catalogs – 94 in a series – Peonies and iris (1910) by Peterson Nursery

Historical Seed Catalogs – 94 in a series – Peonies and iris (1910) by Peterson Nursery

Historical Seed Catalogs - 94 in a series - Peonies and iris (1910) by Peterson Nursery

Historical Seed Catalogs - 94 in a series - Peonies and iris (1910) by Peterson Nursery

Historical Seed Catalogs - 94 in a series - Peonies and iris (1910) by Peterson Nursery

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Tke Herbaceous Peony

The herbaceous peony of today stands unchallenged as the most popular of hardy plants, and its friends who know its possibilities and its many good qualities are willing to back it against all comers as the best and most beau- tful flower that grows. Its popularity has increased by leaps and bounds in the United States during the last two decades since the new improved varieties have been developed and become known. There are at present some 2,000 varie- ties of Japanese, French, Dutch, English and American ori- gin; the public has been quick to appreciate the improved vari- eties, and demand the best; till now it holds full sway during June, which is becoming rather the month of peonies than of roses.

Peonies range in color from cream and purest white through the various shades of pink, lilac, rose and red to the deepest carmine, purple and maroon, in every possible combination) of shade and form. Size varies from four to eight inches in diameter. IMost of them have a delightful fragrance.

Culture

This is one of the strong points. Nothing is easier to grow. As contrasted with the rose, chrysanthemum, and carnation, which can be perfected only under the skillful care of the expert florist, the peony needs but to be put into good, rich soil and left alone,-, where for eight, ten or even twenty years it will increase in size and beauty each year. If given a mulch of manure in the late fall, which is left on all winter, the added enrichment of the soil will perhaps yield more and better blooms, but it is not needed as a protection. They are remarkably free from disease.

When dormant in early fall they can be shipped long dis- tances without injury. It is possible to transplant and ship them in the spring, but we do not recommend it, as they then undergo a severe set-back, andl do not bloom as freely for several years. The very best time is September, and that is when we begin filling orders.

They should be planted with eyes two to tHrae inches below the surface and the ground pressed firmly about the roots. They can be divided as small as desired, so long as each piece has at least one good strong eye on a piece of tuber.


SEE MORE:

Publication date 1910
Topics Nursery stock Illinois Chicago CatalogsFlowers CatalogsPlants, Ornamental Catalogs
Publisher Chicago, Ill. : Wm. A. Peterson
Collection usda-nurseryandseedcatalogusdanationalagriculturallibrarybiodiversityfedlinkamericana
Digitizing sponsor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Contributor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Language English
Volume 1910

 


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