From The Journal Of Screenwriting V1 Issue 1: Screenwriting strategies in Marguerite Duras’s script for Hiroshima, Mon Amour (1960) by Rosamund Davies

Highlighting the articles in the past editions of the Journal of Screenwriting, of which I am the Book Reviews Editor. Hopefully these abstracts will entice you to did a little deeper into the history and future of screenwriting. — Rosanne


Screenwriting strategies in Marguerite Duras’s script for Hiroshima, Mon Amour (1960) by Rosamund Davies

The published scnario et dialogues (Duras 1960) (Figure 1) of the film Hiroshima, Mon Amour (1959) feature precise technical specifications of sound and image and more novelistic passages, all of which create an emotional resonance that has been left to the director to translate into images. This article explores Marguerite Duras’s text as a particular example of how the written component of the screen idea (Macdonald 2004a) might function on the page and as part of a dialogue with the director. It also examines the way that the script’s concern with problematizing and drawing attention to the process of representation makes it a palpable and controlling presence in the resulting film.


The Journal of Screenwriting is an international double-blind peer-reviewed journal that is published three times a year. The journal highlights current academic and professional thinking about the screenplay and intends to promote, stimulate and bring together current research and contemporary debates around the screenplay whilst encouraging groundbreaking research in an international arena. The journal is discursive, critical, rigorous and engages with issues in a dynamic and developing field, linking academic theory to screenwriting practice. 

Get your copy and subscription to the Journal of Screenwriting Today!



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting [Video]

What is the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting? Here is a short introduction.

Stephens College  MFA in TV and Screenwriting  Official AD

We’re pleased to present a new slideshow designed by graphic artist Phoenix Bussey, a Stephens College undergrad, using photos taken by MFA candidates during the last few years of workshops. We think it tells our story well. Write. Reach. Represent.

Visit the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting web site to apply today!

Drs. Rosanne Welch and Sarah Clark discuss “Don’t Look a Gift Horse in the Mouth” on the Zilch Podcast’s Monkees 101 Series [Audio]

Drs. Rosanne Welch and Sarah Clark discuss “Don’t Look a Gift Horse in the Mouth” on the Zilch Podcast’s Monkees 101 Series

As you know I always LOVE talking television so when fellow Dr. Sarah Clark of Zilch Nation asked me a while back if I’d like to cohost an ongoing segment of Zilch where we analyze each of the 58  episodes of The Monkees — I jumped at the chance.

Even though I did a lot of this work in the book – I couldn’t cover all the episodes so this segment allows us to take one at a time and do our own critical studies and popular culture coverage. 

Drs. Rosanne Welch and Sarah Clark discuss “Don't Look a Gift Horse in the Mouth” on the Zilch Podcast's Monkees 101 Series [Audio]

Monkees 101 with Rosanne Welch and Sarah Clark discuss the 8th episode of “The Monkees” -“Don’t Look a Gift Horse in the Mouth”,  Anthony Pomes reviews the new Micky & Mike Live CD, Bob & Bethany Kriger Thies Do a song dealing with C-19 as only Monkees fans could. We dedicate this episode to Adam Schlesinger Singer-songwriter and Producer, Thank you for being part of The Monkees story and understanding them and us.

Listen to this episode


Want to learn more about The Monkees? Buy Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

 

A hit television show about a fictitious rock band, The Monkees (1966-1968) earned two Emmys–Outstanding Comedy Series and Outstanding Directorial Acheivement in Comedy.

Capitalizing on the show’s success, the actual band formed by the actors, at their peak, sold more albums than The Beatles and The Rolling Stones combined, and set the stage for other musical TV characters from The Partridge Family to Hannah Montana. In the late 1980s, the Monkees began a series of reunion tours that continued into their 50th anniversary.

This book tells the story of The Monkees and how the show changed television, introducing a new generation to the fourth-wall-breaking slapstick created by Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers.

Its creators contributed to the innovative film and television of 1970s with projects like Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Laugh-In and Welcome Back, Kotter. Immense profits from the show, its music and its merchandising funded the producers’ move into films such as Head, Easy Riderand Five Easy Pieces.

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

Want to use “Why The Monkees Matter” in your classroom?

Order Examination Copies, Library and Campus Bookstore orders directly from McFarland

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09 More Edith Wharton’s Ghost Stories from When Women Write Horror with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (32 seconds)

Watch this entire presentation

09 More Edith Wharton's Ghost Stories from When Women Write Horror with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Subscribe to Rosanne’s Channel and receive notice of each new video!

 

In honor of Halloween – and in service to my teaching philosophy —

“Words Matter. Writers Matter. Women Writers Matter.”

I presented this holiday lecture “When Women Write Horror” on Tuesday, October 29th, 2019. Researching the many, many women who have written horror stories – in novels, films and television – brought new names to my attention who I am excited to start reading. I hope you will be, too!

Transcript:

Who has done anything with her ghost stories for Christmas? I think that’d be an excellent thing to check into. Her house is on a haunted home tour, right,, if you go through the UK. You can study her house. That’s her library. When you see libraries like that from the old days, those are usually the rooms that belong to men. Those were the man caves of their day, but this is hers. This room belonged to a woman who was a writer and its haunted by her spirit. So I’m kind of making myself want to go do this tour while I think about it.

From The Journal Of Screenwriting V1 Issue 1: Creating Authorship? Lindsay Anderson and David Sherwin’s collaboration on If. (1968) by Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

Highlighting the articles in the past editions of the Journal of Screenwriting, of which I am the Book Reviews Editor. Hopefully these abstracts will entice you to did a little deeper into the history and future of screenwriting. — Rosanne


Creating Authorship? Lindsay Anderson and David Sherwin’s collaboration on If. (1968) by Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard
 
This article draws upon the research currently undertaken for my doctoral thesis and is meant to act as a complementary study of Lindsay Anderson and David Sherwin’s partnership on If. (1968), following Charles Drazin’s 2008 article for the Journal of British Cinema and Television, If before If. Charles Drazin (2008: 318) highlights the idea of a creative dynamic underlying the working partnership between Lindsay Anderson and David Sherwin on If., as well as in the subsequent projects they developed together. The following article aims to uncover the nature of the creative dynamic suggested by Drazin’s article by looking at both the personal and the artistic dimensions that the working relationship assumed. The aim is to highlight the distinctiveness of their collaboration in the cinema; the article will show that in the course of this collaborative work they realized their artistic potential through an exchange of expertise, and that their collaboration helped to bring about an alternative approach to the conventional opposition between screenwriter and director, especially when it comes to claiming authorship over a film.


The Journal of Screenwriting is an international double-blind peer-reviewed journal that is published three times a year. The journal highlights current academic and professional thinking about the screenplay and intends to promote, stimulate and bring together current research and contemporary debates around the screenplay whilst encouraging groundbreaking research in an international arena. The journal is discursive, critical, rigorous and engages with issues in a dynamic and developing field, linking academic theory to screenwriting practice. 

Get your copy and subscription to the Journal of Screenwriting Today!



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

08 Edith Wharton’s Ghost Stories from When Women Write Horror with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (1 minute 3 seconds)

Watch this entire presentation

08 Edith Wharton's Ghost Stories from When Women Write Horror with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Subscribe to Rosanne’s Channel and receive notice of each new video!

 

In honor of Halloween – and in service to my teaching philosophy —

“Words Matter. Writers Matter. Women Writers Matter.”

I presented this holiday lecture “When Women Write Horror” on Tuesday, October 29th, 2019. Researching the many, many women who have written horror stories – in novels, films and television – brought new names to my attention who I am excited to start reading. I hope you will be, too!

Transcript:

Now Edith Wharton is somebody people sometimes had to study in high school especially if you did an AP sort of literature class and she’s fascinating because she is the first woman ever to win a Pulitzer Prize. Which is huge for a woman right in 1927 — which I think is great — for The Age Of Innocence which was turned into a film. This is a whole section of her books here. We teach her in schools. Sometimes kids find her boring because the world she writes about was that world of proper manners and all that sort of thing and they have to really work through why this is interesting. I think we should teach some of her ghost stories. If we taught her ghost stories how more interested would an audience be and then maybe they’d want to read the more grown-up world and society that she’s, you know, satirizing. I think it’s really cool that she put out all these ghost stories back in the day. Afterward is her ghost story for Christmas, which is nothing more than what Charles Dickens did with A Christmas Carol. We read him every year. There’s been how many versions of a Christmas carol made into films including The Muppets which is the best one.

From The Journal Of Screenwriting V1 Issue 1: Tonino Guerra: the screenwriter as a narrative technician or as a poet of images? by Riikka Pelo

Highlighting the articles in the past editions of the Journal of Screenwriting, of which I am the Book Reviews Editor. Hopefully these abstracts will entice you to did a little deeper into the history and future of screenwriting. — Rosanne


Tonino Guerra: the screenwriter as a narrative technician or as a poet of images? Authorship and method in the writerdirector relationship by Riikka Pelo

The article focuses on the invisible role of the screenwriter and makes observations about the screenwriter’s part in the process of writing a screenplay together with a director. By studying the two examples of the collaboration between the screenwriter and poet Tonino Guerra with the directors Michelangelo Antonioni and Andrei Tarkovsky, the intention is to follow the ways in which authorship is both constituted and shared in such a liaison. I observe how the craft of the screenwriter is understood in relation to the different aspects of his task. By focusing on the case study around the writing of the film Nostalghia/Nostalgia (1983), I also consider how responsibility in developing these aspects is shared between screenwriter and director during different phases of a screenwriting process: in gathering ideas, sketching, building the story structure, writing drafts, rewriting and completing the final draft.


The Journal of Screenwriting is an international double-blind peer-reviewed journal that is published three times a year. The journal highlights current academic and professional thinking about the screenplay and intends to promote, stimulate and bring together current research and contemporary debates around the screenplay whilst encouraging groundbreaking research in an international arena. The journal is discursive, critical, rigorous and engages with issues in a dynamic and developing field, linking academic theory to screenwriting practice. 

Get your copy and subscription to the Journal of Screenwriting Today!



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Event: Stephens MFA in TV and Screenwriting Online Open House – Thursday, April 23, 2020

Event: Stephens MFA in TV and Screenwriting Online Open House - Thursday, April 23, 2020

Click To Register For The Conference

Write
Reach
Represent

Online Open House with
Program Executive Director Dr. Rosanne Welch
and Director of Admissions Sally Bohlinger

Stephens College Low Residency M.F.A in TV and Screenwriting

  • London, United Kingdom Fri, Apr 24, 2020 at 12:30 am BST
  • Eastern Time, ET Thu, Apr 23, 2020 at 7:30 pm EDT
  • Central Time, CT Thu, Apr 23, 2020 at 6:30 pm CDT
  • Mountain Time, MT Thu, Apr 23, 2020 at 5:30 pm MDT
  • Pacific Time, PT Thu, Apr 23, 2020 at 4:30 pm PDT
  • Sydney, Australia Fri, Apr 24, 2020 at 9:30 am AEST 

Learn more about this ground-breaking program focused on bringing more female and underrepresented voices into the mainstream media. The MFA boasts an impressive record of success and some of the best faculty and mentors in the industry.

RSVP for Conference Links to gradmissions@stephens.edu

07 African-American Writers In History from When Women Write Horror with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (53 seconds)

Watch this entire presentation

07 African-American Writers In History from When Women Write Horror with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Subscribe to Rosanne’s Channel and receive notice of each new video!

 

In honor of Halloween – and in service to my teaching philosophy —

“Words Matter. Writers Matter. Women Writers Matter.”

I presented this holiday lecture “When Women Write Horror” on Tuesday, October 29th, 2019. Researching the many, many women who have written horror stories – in novels, films and television – brought new names to my attention who I am excited to start reading. I hope you will be, too!

Transcript:

We also have difficulty finding African-American successes in the past because those aren’t the stories that were passed forward. When we think about female writers who were African Americans Phyllis Wheatley is who we hear about in this time period right in this earlier time period excuse me. And then we Pauline Hopkins who was publishing ghost stories. She was an African-American woman in the period publishing in the Colored American magazine right? So this is an outlet for writers back in the day and she was publishing all kinds of stories that had to do with the ghosts of slavery. So she’s talking about a real piece of history and essentially what she’s doing is discussing PTSD without giving it that terminology that we’ve given it today. When you think about being haunted by the past — that’s a ghost story and this is what she was doing in the 1880s right? So just 20 years really 15 years past the end of slavery. So she’s a pretty cool person.

06 LGBTQ Writers In History from When Women Write Horror with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (1 minute 8 seconds)

Watch this entire presentation

06 LGBTQ Writers In History from When Women Write Horror with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Subscribe to Rosanne’s Channel and receive notice of each new video!

 

In honor of Halloween – and in service to my teaching philosophy —

“Words Matter. Writers Matter. Women Writers Matter.”

I presented this holiday lecture “When Women Write Horror” on Tuesday, October 29th, 2019. Researching the many, many women who have written horror stories – in novels, films and television – brought new names to my attention who I am excited to start reading. I hope you will be, too!

Transcript:

It’s very difficult studying LGBTQ people from the past because we don’t have a definitive “here’s a piece of paper that promises you that I am gay” because it was against the law, right? So nobody did that. So scholars have had to find ways to say ‘Here are some pieces of evidence we can use to generally guess this was probably the story and being buried side by side is kind of one of them. Another is wills. Often people would grant their land to someone who had been their companion for many years rather than inheriting it to a cousin or some far-flung relative if they didn’t have children. So scholars have had to work hard to figure that out but I think it’s really interesting. There’s a thing in the UK called Places Of Pride and it’s a tour you can take of LGBTQ locations and her gravesite is one of them. So I think, she’s a really interesting woman. To read her supernatural stories and see what underlying theme — what was she trying to say about how we’re afraid of different things. People tell you what they really want as a message in their writing and I think that’s somebody we should know.