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Announcing my new post as Reviews Editor for the Journal of Screenwriting

I’m pleased to announce that I’ve been asked to serve as Reviews Editor for the Journal of Screenwriting, published by Intellect, Ltd.

The Journal explores “the nature of writing for the moving image in the broadest sense, highlighting current academic thinking around scriptwriting whilst also reflecting on this with a truly international perspective and outlook.”

It’s the international aspect that interests and impresses me the most. I look forward to working on such an elegant publication and such a distinguished group of academics:

Rosanne Welch Reviews Editor

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Enjoy “Why The Monkees Matter”? Check out these other titles from McFarland!

If you enjoyed “Why The Monkees Matter” you can find even more interesting titles by my publisher in McFarland’s 2017 Pop Culture Books Catalog.

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Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 46 in a series – The Spy Who Came In From The Cool

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

Since Gardner and Caruso had cut their writing teeth on television’s number one spy parody, Get Smart, “The Spy Who Came in from the Cool” tended to involve more homages to Buck Henry’s series buried within than stereotypes of Russians. Mostly that came from the characterizations of the two Russian spies. Arlene Martel as Madame had already played three different Russian females on Hogan’s Heroes and clearly played ethnic so well she was cast as the farthest thing from an American – T’Pring, the Vulcan bride of the alien Mr. Spock, in “Amok Time” on Star Trek. 

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

More on Adapting Argo from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (0:37)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

More on Adapting Argo from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (0:37)

 

Transcript:

So that was one change and that change happens all the time in movies and that’s regrettable because people need to be represented. We need to understand that we’re in a multi-cultural, diverse, country and every time we take a character that has some ethnic background — I mean imagine Vito Corelone — actually, when they went to make The Godfather, one of the people up for playing Michael Corelone was Robert Redford. As an Italian? How was that going to work? Right? But he was a big name. He was young. Whatever. So. that was one change that Affleck was forced to make or the movie wouldn’t have been made at all, which I think is interesting. He thought the story was worth getting out there.

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

From The Research Vault: Musical influences, the mysteries of songwriting and God.

Yet another research resource for Why The Monkees Matter

Musical influences, the mysteries of songwriting and God
Barrett, Joel. (2014, March 6). Musical influences, the mysteries of songwriting and God.  

JB: What were some of your earlier influences musically?

RS: My first favorite song was “Daydream Believer,” the Monkees’ version. How’s that for guilty pleasure? I loved that song when I was 8 or 9 years old and I still love it. Of course, there was Dylan, we always had Dylan in the house all the time. We had Gilbert and Sullivan. We had the Beatles. Kingston Trio, Pete Seeger. For me, it was mostly the Monkees and the Beatles. Shortly thereafter, the Allman Brothers, and then shortly thereafter Genesis and then shortly thereafter Bruce Springsteen, which caused a horrible riff between me and my ‘art rock-prog’ friends. They couldn’t understand Springsteen. The early stuff really is probably Dylan and the Beatles.

JB: When did you know that music could really be your career?

RS: It was in Hartford, Conn., right after my first record came out. I still had some doubts if this could happen as an actual career. I went to a gig at WWUH and afterwards I sold $325 worth of CDs, which to me at that time was a ridiculous amount of money. After the gig they said this is the money for your CDs. I just not could believe that they’d give me $325 for 22 CDs. I thought it was the greatest thing that ever happened. Right then and there, a little switch went off in my head, “aha. I like this.”

JB: If you weren’t a singer-songwriter, what would you be?

RS: An editor.

Read this entire article


Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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Previously in Out of Research Vault:

A History of Screenwriting – 6 in a series – Baby’s Meal – Repas de Bebe (1895) – LOUIS LUMIERE

I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch


Baby’s Meal (1895) – LOUIS LUMIERE – Repas de Bebe

Baby's Meal (1895) - LOUIS LUMIERE - Repas de Bebe

Repas de Bébé (also known as Baby’s Meal and Feeding the Baby) is directed and produced by Louis Lumière and stars Andrée Lumière. The film consists of one shot of Auguste Lumière, his wife and baby daughter having breakfast in the countryside.

Learn more about the Lumiere Brothers with these books

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Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 45 in a series – Native American Portrayals

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

Perhaps due to the attention drawn by the Red Power Movement during the run of The Monkees, Native Americans tended to fare better than Americans of Asian descent.  Perhaps the fact that Dolenz self-identified as part Native American on his mother’s side had an effect. Perhaps the writers were looking to move beyond the Tonto/Lone Ranger dynamic. Or perhaps the writers and actors found a connection between Native Americans and the emerging ideology of the hippie movement. 

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

Adapting Argo from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (1:06)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Adapting Argo from A History of the Art of Adaptation

 

Transcript:

Argo which, of course, won the Oscar just a couple of years ago is an example of some changes that were made that are regrettable and yet the movie holds up and it’s not Ben Affleck’s fault. When Ben Affleck went to make the movie, which won an Oscar for him, he knew that in the story, which is a true story, the actual CIA gentleman is named Tony Mendez. Tony Mendez and Affleck doesn’t look like a Tony Mendez. He wanted a Latino actor to be the lead in the film. he looked for someone that the studio would approve. The only Latino actor one considers to open a movie is Antonio Banderas and he’s booked, booked, booked. Because he’s the only Latino actor who can open a movie. So, the studio said to Affleck, “Look, why don’t you play the part?”

“But I’m not Latino. It’s going to erase the ethnic feeling of this movie.”

And they said, Ok, then we just won’t make the movie.”

He said, “Ok, as long as we keep the guy’s name. Maybe people will realize” and of course, if they look at the book they will understand that we’re talking about a Hispanic actor.

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

From The Research Vault: THE MONKEES – Clive James Talks Back interview (ITV), 4th March 1997

Yet another research resource for Why The Monkees Matter

THE MONKEES – Clive James Talks Back interview (ITV), 4th March 1997

From The Research Vault: THE MONKEES - Clive James Talks Back interview (ITV), 4th March 1997

This 1997 interview clip involves all four actor/musicians on the Clive James program out of the UK.  They discuss the Justus tour, their history, and the 30th anniversary special that aired that year.  James (or his editors) are  good at giving each their individual moment during the interview.  James defines the show as “their old but always new” series – which is a compliment and shows how James understood the show and its importance.  It’s always interesting to compare the questions asked by American interviewers and those from other countries. — Rosanne


Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

Order Your Copy Now!

Previously in Out of Research Vault: