35 Danny Pink from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (1:07)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

35 Danny Pink from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (1:07)

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

So I think that’s pretty cool. Then we had Danny Pink, a guy who’d been in the wars who’s now a math teacher right? He’s Clara’s boyfriend. So we have him as a soldier but we really see him as a man who protects children because he worked with middle school children. We don’t have a lot of middle school teachers who are male right? Because we don’t pay them enough and that’s bad because young men need to see that teaching is an excellent career — that caregiving and that nurturing the younger generation is a valuable thing to do with your life. So Danny Pink is really important in that respect and of course in the same way sadly Danny becomes a Cyberman and he makes this ultimate choice. The Doctor has one chance that you can come back alive from that and it gives it to Danny and instead of taking it for himself so he can come back and be with his girlfriend, he gives it to the little Afghan child that he accidentally shot when he was in the wars. He gives away his chance to live to a boy that was you know accidentally shot by him and I’m like what a powerful thing for a male character to choose to do. I think that makes Danny super super sensitive right and super strong!

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
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Rosanne Welch, PhD

Rosanne Welch PhD teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.

When Women Wrote Hollywood – Little Women (1933) – 39 in a series – Wr: Sarah Y. Mason and Victor Heerman

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 38 in a series – Sarah Y. Mason and Victor Heerman

Little Women is a 1933 American pre-Code drama film, directed by George Cukor and starring Katharine HepburnJoan BennettFrances Dee and Jean Parker. The screenplay, by Sarah Y. Mason and Victor Heerman, is based on the 1868 novel of the same name, by Louisa May Alcott. — Wikipedia 

More information about Little Women (1933)

More about Sarah Y. Mason and Victor Heerman


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A morning at @lakotacoffee to start our @citizenjanefilmfestival day! Fun today, work tomorrow! via Instagram

34 Rory Williams from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (0:56)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

34 Rory Williams from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (0:56)

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

Rory is such a cool character. I know the joke has really died how many times almost as bad as South Park all right but think about what Rory did all right. First of all he willingly married somebody who was running around having these adventures right. When she was gone for a while he never lost faith that he would find her and that she would still love him. That nothing could happen that would make him stop loving her. He’s all about being a man in love with a woman. That is his definition in life right and usually that’s how we define women by the men in their life but Rory is defined by the woman in his life which is pretty cool and as we know when she was trapped in the Pandorica for a thousand years he willingly agreed to stay and guard her. That’s how much he loved her. So if I was thinking about sensitivity and emotions Rory is defined by his ability to love which again is generally gendered as a thing that women do best.

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
https://twitter.com/rosannewelchhttp://instagram.com/drrosannewelch

 

Rosanne Welch, PhD

Rosanne Welch PhD teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood – 10 in a series – Smart Girl In Charge

Do you know about these women screenwriters? Many don’t. Learn more about them today!

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood - 10 in a series - Smart Girl In Charge

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“In London one of Eve Unsell’s first employees was a young Alfred Hitchcock who designed title cards presumably under Unsell’s tutelage on such films as The Call of Youth (1921). Unsell is credited with teaching Hitchcock ‘the ins and outs of story and screenplay mechanics as well as adapting novels for film.'”

Smart Girl In Charge: Eve Unsell
Laura Kirk


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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

33 Mickey and Martha from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (1:01)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

33 Mickey and Martha from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (1:01)

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

…and just a side note in the world of production which I think is so interesting. When they went to film this particular episode each of these two actors had other jobs. So it turned out by accident they were only available on the same morning to film their goodbye scene. So Russell Davies invented the fact that they were married. he actually had two different stories written for them to film on different days and suddenly he only had them for 3 hours one morning. So he married them off. Though it was cute. Put it up there. Controversy from people saying “You took the only people of African descent and forced them to be married to each other like you don’t believe in interracial marriage.” I had two actors who could only work on one day. I had to be creative and I personally think that that’s an excellent ending for both of them because they shared adventures with The Doctor. How do you get together with someone who doesn’t share your background? who can’t understand your emotions and what you’ve done in your life, right? So Mickey. Mickey is a cool sensitive guy. Of course, I’ve already talked about captain Jack so I’ll just fly through him. Nothing wrong with looking at a few pictures of Captain Jack for a few minutes. Doesn’t hurt anybody to go, “Wow!”

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
https://twitter.com/rosannewelchhttp://instagram.com/drrosannewelch

 

Rosanne Welch, PhD

Rosanne Welch PhD teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood – 9 in a series – Marion Fairfax In Demand

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood - 9 in a series - In Demand

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“The Lost World was an adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous dinosaur novel, and the film itself did the story justice. Fairfax both wrote the adaptation and directed the editing.

After the massive success of The Lost World, which broke records, Fairfax was more in demand than ever.”

Silent Screenwriter, Producer and Director: Marion Fairfax
Sarah Phillips


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 35 in a series – “A Star Is Born” (1937), Wr: Dorothy Parker

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 35 in a series – “A Star Is Born” (1937), Wr: Dorothy Parker

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 35 in a series -

A Star Is Born is a 1937 American Technicolor romantic drama film produced by David O. Selznick, directed by William A. Wellman from a script by Wellman, Robert Carson, Dorothy Parker, and Alan Campbell, and starring Janet Gaynor (in her only Technicolor film) as an aspiring Hollywood actress, and Fredric March(in his Technicolor debut) as a fading movie star who helps launch her career. The supporting cast features Adolphe Menjou, May Robson, Andy Devine, Lionel Stander, and Owen Moore.

It was originally made in 1937 with Janet Gaynor and Fredric March, and then remade three times: 1954 (starring Judy Garland and James Mason), in 1976(starring Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson), and in 2018 (starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper).

North Dakota farm girl Esther Victoria Blodgett yearns to become a Hollywood actress. Although her aunt and father discourage such thoughts, Esther’s grandmother gives Esther her savings to follow her dream.

Esther goes to Hollywood and tries to land a job as an extra, but so many others have had the same idea that the casting agency has stopped accepting applications. Esther is told that her chances of becoming a star are one in 100,000. She befriends a new resident at her boarding house, assistant director Danny McGuire, himself out of work. When Danny and Esther go to a concert to celebrate Danny’s employment, Esther has her first encounter with Norman Maine, an actor she admires greatly. Norman has been a major star for years, but his alcoholism has sent his career into a downward spiral. — Wikipedia 

A Star is Born (1937) Trailer

More About “A Star Is Born” (1937)

More about Dorothy Parker

More books by and about Dorothy Parker


Buy a signed copy of when Women Wrote Hollywood

 

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 34 in a series – Dorothy Parker

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 33 in a series – The Little Foxes (1941) – Wr: Lillian Hellman

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 34 in a series - Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker (née Rothschild; August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American poet, writer, critic, and satirist based in New York; she was best known for her wit, wisecracks, and eye for 20th-century urban foibles.

From a conflicted and unhappy childhood, Parker rose to acclaim, both for her literary works published in such magazines as The New Yorker and as a founding member of the Algonquin Round Table. Following the breakup of the circle, Parker traveled to Hollywood to pursue screenwriting. Her successes there, including two Academy Award nominations, were curtailed when her involvement in left-wing politics resulted in the being placed on the Hollywood blacklist.

Dismissive of her own talents, she deplored her reputation as a “wisecracker.” Nevertheless, both her literary output and reputation for sharp wit have endured. — Wikipedia 

A Star is Born (1937) Trailer

More about Dorothy Parker

More books by and about Dorothy Parker


Buy a signed copy of when Women Wrote Hollywood

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

32 Mickey Smith from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video ] (1:07)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

32 Mickey Smith from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video ] (1:07)

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

Mickey is probably one of my favorite companions. Right? Because he starts out as Rose’s boyfriend. He loses her to The Doctor — so that kind of makes him a loser because he lost his girlfriend. That’s kind of sad, right and they played with that a little bit. He wasn’t quite as good as The Doctor, but he worked at it. He discovered that he wanted to be more in the episode where Sarah Jane came back and what he really does that is so cool is when he has a chance to pick a parallel universe or a real universe, he wants to stay in the universe where his grandmother is still alive. His grandmother is the most important influence in his life. Not a grandfather. Not a dad. A woman who he wants to spend more time within his own life. SoI thought that was a super cool thing for him to choose to do. And of course, at the very end of David Tennant’s era, he visited all his past companions and did something to save their life before he regenerated and we discovered that in the interim Mickey and Martha have fallen in love and gotten married. So, he picked the most equal and powerful woman that he could be with if he couldn’t have Rose. Right? So, he grew up and moved on to an adult relationship, not a dependent younger relationship..

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
https://twitter.com/rosannewelchhttp://instagram.com/drrosannewelch

 

Rosanne Welch, PhD

Rosanne Welch PhD teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.