When Women Wrote Hollywood – 11 in a series – The Shocking Miss Pilgrim (1947), Story: Frederica Sagor Maas

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 11 in a series – The Shocking Miss Pilgrim (1947), Story: Frederica Sagor Maas

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 11 in a series - The Shocking Miss Pilgrim (1947), Wr: Frederica Sagor Maas

The Shocking Miss Pilgrim is a 1947 American musical comedy film in Technicolor written and directed by George Seaton, and starring Betty Grable and Dick Haymes.

The screenplay, based on a story by Frederica Sagor Maas and Ernest Maas, focuses on a young typist who becomes involved in the Women’s Suffrage movement in 1874. The songs were composed by George and Ira Gershwin. Marilyn Monroe made her film debut as an uncredited voice as a telephone operator.

In 1941, husband-and-wife screenwriting team Ernest Maas and Frederica Sagor collaborated on Miss Pilgrim’s Progress, a story about a young woman who enters the business world by demonstrating the newly invented typewriter in the window of a Wall Street establishment. When she tries to fend off the unwanted advances of one of the firm’s clerks, her employer comes to her rescue but is killed when he falls down the stairs in the ensuing altercation. Abigail Pilgrim becomes the focus of a murder trial that attracts widespread coverage by the media and the attention of Susan B. Anthony when the concept of women working in offices comes under fire.[2] Wikipedia 

Miss pilgrim

More about Frederica Sagor Maas


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

Also available soon via Amazon.com in Print and eBook editions

 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 10 in a series – Frederica Sagor Maas

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 10 in a series – Frederica Sagor Maas

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 10 in a series - Frederica Sagor Maas

Frederica Alexandrina Sagor Maas (/ˌfɹɛdəˈɹikə səˈgɔɹ mæs/; July 6, 1900 – January 5, 2012) was an American dramatist and playwright, screenwriter, memoirist, and author,[1] the youngest daughter of Russian immigrants. As an essayist, Maas was best known for a detailed, tell-all memoir of her time spent in early Hollywood.[2] She was one of the oldest surviving entertainers from the silent film era.[3]

Once in Hollywood, Maas negotiated a contract with Preferred Pictures to adapt Percy Marks’s novel The Plastic Age for film. Based on this, she was signed to a three-year contract with MGM for $350 per week, though in her words: “I had the peculiar feeling that wily Louis B. [Mayer] was less interested in my writing ability than in signing someone who had worked for Ben Schulberg and Al Lichtman.”[5] It was in this period that she wrote the screenplays for silent films Dance Madnessand The Waning Sex. Wikipedia 

Miss pilgrim

More about Frederica Sagor Maas


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

Also available soon via Amazon.com in Print and eBook editions

 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

“When Women Wrote Hollywood” In The News: Uncovering the secret history of women in Hollywood, University of Kansas

What a great read! 

Check out this profile of professor Laura Kirk, who contributed 2 chapters to When Women Wrote Hollywood, published by the University of Kansas where she teaches film acting for the Department of Film & Media Studies. 

Her chapters involve Silent Era writer Eve Unsell and musical scenario writer Bella Spewack.

Read more about these – and all the great early female screenwriters in the book!

Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood In The News: Uncovering the secret history of women in Hollywood, University of Kansas

LAWRENCE — After working for many years as an actor and producer, Laura Kirk returned to her native Kansas in 2012 and joined the University of Kansas Department of Film & Media Studies as a lecturer, teaching film acting.

Now, in her first big work of academic scholarship, Kirk has contributed two chapters to “When Women Wrote Hollywood” (McFarland), a new book aimed at bringing the secret female history of Hollywood to light.

Kirk wrote about Kansan Eve Unsell, a screenwriter whose career spanned the silent and talkie era, and Bella Spewack, the journalist, author and screenwriter best known for “Kiss Me Kate.”

“When this industry started, women wrote 50 percent of the screenplays,” Kirk said. “And yet Eve Unsell was not in the index of any history book. Many of the women who have chapters in this book have not been written about in any real way.”

Unsell, for instance, got a two-line obituary in the Los Angeles Times when she died in 1937 at age 50. She was born in Chicago and grew up in Caldwell, a small Kansas town in Sumner County.

“She has 96 credits on IMDb,” the Internet Movie Database, Kirk said. “She was credited with training Alfred Hitchcock. She ran the Paramount studio in England. … I talk about how she was one of the first people to settle in Malibu when it was wild and natural and scenic.”

Eve unsell inset 250Laura kirk 172

Read this entire article – Uncovering the secret history of women in Hollywood, University of Kansas

Order your copy of When Women Wrote Hollywood Today

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Steven Moffatt Prepares for Lady Doctor from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (1:13)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

Steven Moffatt Prepares for Lady Doctor from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

Have to give Steven for laying the groundwork finally and, as I said, if you look at his writing, when Matt changed he gave us “Not a girl. Still not ginger.” — a little ginger joke there. Which is fine. he made everyone think they were going to pick — oh my gosh I never forgot his name — Ron Weasley — yes — Rupert Grint, thank you so much. There was discussion that Rupert Grint would become a new Doctor, so a little joke there, the ginger is referencing that. So he knows what’s happening in culture. What people are saying about his program, right? So he laid that in. he also laid in in “The Doctor’s Wife” which is a marvelous episode — written by Neil Gaiman, wh you might know form American Gods and the other very cool novels. So they invited Nei Gaiman to come in and write an episode and they found old, dead, Timelords trapped in these little boxes and this is what he said about this guy, right? “He didn’t feel himself unless he had the tattoo. Or herself, a couple of times. Ooooo, she was a bad girl.” So Timelord who switched their gender It is possible. So Steven is writing or Executive Producing the writing in all these episodes. So he’s laying the groundwork for all this to happen.

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
https://twitter.com/rosannewelchhttp://instagram.com/drrosannewelch

 

Rosanne Welch, PhD

Rosanne Welch PhD teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

 

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.

More on When Women Wrote Hollywood – Adela Rogers St. Johns – Yesterday’s Children: A Cosmopolitan Book-Length Complete Novel

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


More on When Women Wrote Hollywood – Adela Rogers St. Johns – Yesterday’s Children: A Cosmopolitan Book-Length Complete Novel

Adela Rogers St. Johns was a prolific writer in many different formats besides screenwriting. This novel was published in the June 1939 issue of Cosmopolitan

More on When Women Wrote Hollywood - Adela Rogers St. Johns - Yesterday's Children: A Cosmopolitan Book-Length Complete Novel

Adela rogers st johnsAdela rogers st john 9469593 1 402

More information on Adela Rogers St. Johns

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 9 in a series – A Woman of Affairs (1928), Wr: Michael Arlen and Bess Meredyth, Dir: Clarence Brown

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 9 in a series – A Woman of Affairs (1928), Wr: Michael Arlen and Bess Meredyth, Dir: Clarence Brown

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 9 in a series - A Woman of Affairs (1928), Wr: Michael Arlen and Bess Meredyth, Dir: Clarence Brown

A Woman of Affairs is a 1928 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer drama film directed by Clarence Brown and starring Greta Garbo, John Gilbert, Douglas Fairbanks Jr.and Lewis Stone. The film, released with a synchronized score and sound effects, was based on a 1924 best-selling novel by Michael Arlen, The Green Hat, which he adapted as a four-act stage play in 1925. The Green Hat was considered so daring in the United States that the movie did not allow any associations with it and was renamed A Woman of Affairs, with the characters also renamed to mollify the censors.[2] In particular the film script eliminated all references to heroin use, homosexuality and syphilis that were at the core of the tragedies involved.

The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing, for Michael Arlen and Bess Meredyth’s script. Wikipedia 

A Clip from A Woman of Affairs

800px Garbo Gilbert publicity

A Woman of Affairs 1928

More about Bess Meredyth and A Woman of Affairs


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

Also available soon via Amazon.com in Print and eBook editions

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 8 in a series – Bess Meredyth

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch


When Women Wrote Hollywood – 8 in a series – Bess Meredyth

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 8 in a series - Bess  Meredyth

Bess Meredyth (February 12, 1890 – July 13, 1969) was a screenwriter and silent film actress. The wife of film director Michael Curtiz, Meredyth wrote The Affairs of Cellini (1934) and adapted The Unsuspected (1947). She was one of the 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Meredyth and director Michael Curtiz met soon after his arrival in the United States, while both were working at Warner Brothers Studios.[5] They were married in 1929 and unsuccessfully attempted to start a production unit at MGM studios in 1946.[1]

Though often uncredited, Meredyth contributed to several of Curtiz’s projects. Most notably, Curtiz reportedly called Meredyth for input several times a day while working on his most successful film, Casablanca (1942). [6]

Meredyth and Curtiz separated twice; once in 1941, and again in 1960. However, they remained in contact after this separation,[1] and Curtiz included Meredyth in his will upon his death in 1962.[5] Wikipedia 

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 8 in a series - Bess  Meredyth

More about Bess Meredyth


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

Also available soon via Amazon.com in Print and eBook editions

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

18 Moffat, Vertue and a Lady Doctor from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (1:08)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

18 Moffat, Vertue and a Lady Doctor from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

Going back to the 80’s, Sydney Newman, who was still in the BBC also said at some point in the history of this show The Doctor should become a woman. So this idea has been around for a while. I don’t think of the 80’s as that far back — but you all weren’t born — so it’s a long time ago to you and these ideas were there but among artists not quite in the major society. This is why art is so important. That’s how we influence society. So Sydney Newman thought that. We don’t get the stepping stones of a lady Doctor until we get Steven Moffat as I have said and his wife Sue Vertue. So a woman helped influence the time for this to happen and as you can see here this is not the cast of Doctor Who. So who is this?

Audience: Sherlock!

The cast of Sherlock, which Steven put together with Mark Gatiss and Sue produces. So his wife is his producing partner. he comes from a marriage where they are equally important in their job if in fact, she is not more important because she produces his work. She sells what he writes. So in a way, obviously, she has the power.

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
https://twitter.com/rosannewelchhttp://instagram.com/drrosannewelch

 

Rosanne Welch, PhD

Rosanne Welch PhD teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.

Index from When Women Wrote Hollywood – Who, what and where of early Hollywood! – Get Your Copy Today

Wondering who and what are covered in When Women Write Hollywood? Take a look at this Index to find out! Then, get your copy today!

Now Available - Signed Copies of

INDEX for When Women Wrote Hollywood

39 Steps, The 168
Academy Awards 2, 9, 15, 17, 58, 61, 153, 175, 177, 180-181, 188, 205, 209
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences 5-6, 25, 58
Actress, The 208
Adam’s Rib 9, 205-207, 211-212, 215
After The Thin Man 144
Akins, Zoë 9, 183-191
Alas and Alack 134
Alcott, Louisa May 9
Algonquin Round Table, The 18, 159, 208
All for Peggy 135
Anastasia, Czarina 194
Angle Shooter 14
Arizona 179
Arzner, Dorothy 14, 188
Astor, Mary 61
Back in Circulation 14
Ball, Lucille 147
Barrymore, Ethel 187
Barrymore, John 60-62, 73
Barrymore, Lionel 15
Beauchamp, Cari 1, 4-5, 32, 40, 105-106, 114
Belasco, David 81-82
Ben-Hur (1924) 7, 57-58, 60-61, 102, 112-113
Beranger, Clara 8, 121, 125-132
Bergman, Ingrid 197
Big House, The 2
Biograph Studios 24, 38, 56-57, 113
Blaché, Alice Guy 6, 33, 47-55
Blaché, Herbert 47, 52, 54
Blacklist 8, 67, 164, 192
Blood and Sand 7, 97, 99-101
Blot, The 109
Bogart, Humphrey 142
Born Yesterday 209=210
Bow, Clara 7, 65-67, 80-81, 84, 89
Boy Meets Girl 195
Brackett, Charles 184
Brawn of the North 202
Cabbage Fairy, The 51
Camille (1921) 7, 99, 101-102, 188
Campbell, Alan 160-164
Capra, Frank 145-146, 196
Captain January (1924) 84
Careers for Women 137-138
Casablanca 58, 149, 171
Cather, Willa 185
Cat’s Meow, The 90
Champ, The 2, 18, 200
Chaney, Lon 80, 83, 118, 122, 133-134
Chaplin, Charlie 5, 71, 74, 91, 99
Chatterton, Ruth 188
Cheat, The 28, 30-32
Children’s Hour, The 8, 151
Christopher Strong 189
Cleopatra (1934) 25
Consequences of Feminism, The 53
Corbaley, Kate 2, 120
Crawford, Joan 11
Cukor, George 17, 44-45, 180-181, 203, 205-206, 209, 212
Curtiz, Michael 58-60
Dance Madness 65
Dark Star 8, 120
Davenport, Dorothy 14, 121
Davies, Marion 2, 41, 91
Davis, Bette 203
de Mille, Richard 120-122, 128-129
de Mille, William C. 8, 65, 71-72, 81, 121-122, 126-129, 132
DeMille, Cecil B. 1-2, 6, 20, 24-31, 65, 81, 83, 104, 110, 118, 122, 129
Death and Taxes 157
Dialogue for a Horse 194
Diary of Anne Frank, The 8, 145, 147-148, 214
Don Juan 61
Doorways in Drumorty 8, 119
Double Life, A 205
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920) 126, 128
Dramatists Guild, The 143
Dressler, Marie 2, 13, 120, 187
Drunken Mattress, The 51
Dynamite 31-32
Earhart, Amelia 12
Easter Parade 146
Edison Company 20, 24
Edison, Thomas Alva 50
Emerson, John 28, 39-40, 43-45
Enough Rope 160
Ephron, Nora 154-155
Epstein, Julius 149
Esquire Magazine 164
Fairbanks, Douglas 1, 5, 27, 38, 40, 178-179
Fairfax, Marion 7, 69-79
Famous Players Lasky 25-26, 70-71, 76, 80, 82-83, 89, 126, 168, 176
Father of the Bride (1949) 146
Father’s Little Dividend (1951) 146
Ferber, Edna 159
Final Verdict 15
First National 72, 74-75, 176
Fitzgerald, F. Scott 9, 43, 203
Fonda, Jane 154
Fontaine, Joan 169-170, 172
Fool and His Money, The 53
Foreign Correspondent 171
Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse 1, 7, 98-100
Free Soul 15
From the Manger to the Cross 8, 114
Garbo, Greta 2, 15, 58, 61, 121, 188
Garland, Judy 146
Gaumont Company 50-51, 54
Gaumont, Léon 6, 48-49, 51-52
Gauntier, Gene 8, 112-116, 121
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes 1, 6, 35, 42-43, 65
Girl Like I, A 37, 42, 45
Gish, Lillian 2, 37
Glyn, Elinor 7, 88-94
Godless Girl, The 30
Goodrich, Frances 8, 140-150
Gordon, Ruth 9, 205-216
Grable, Betty 67
Grant, Cary 172, 195
Great Moment, The 88
Greeks Had A Word for It, The 187-188
Griffith, D. W. 5, 20, 24, 37-39, 51, 56, 83, 104, 106-107, 110
Hackett, Albert 8, 140-150
Hammett, Dashiell 143, 152, 155, 162
Hand That Rocks, The 106
Harlow, Jean 1, 44
Harrison, Joan 9, 161, 166-174
Hart, Moss 145
Hayakawa, Sessue 71
Hayes, Helen 45
Hays Code 44, 61, 151, 172, 194-195
Hearst, William Randolph 12-13, 90-91
Heckerling, Amy 137
Heerman, Victor 9, 175-182
Hellman, Lillian 8-9, 147, 149, 151-156, 161-162, 190
Hepburn, Audrey 148
Hepburn, Katharine 8, 181, 188-189, 197, 203, 207, 209, 211
Hidden Way, The 134, 136-137
His Double Life (1930) 129
His Girl Friday 12, 172
His Picture In The Papers 39
Hitchcock, Alfred 9, 82, 161, 166, 168-169, 171-172, 174
Honeycomb, The 12, 16, 18
Hopper, Hedda 2, 166-167
House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) 8, 150, 154, 156, 162, 197
How to Marry a Millionaire 188
Ince, Thomas 38, 90, 106, 178
Interpretations 184
Intolerance 39, 106
It 66, 88, 91
It’s A Wonderful Life 8, 145-146
Jamaica Inn 169
Johnson, Nunnally 147
Julia 154
Kalem Company, The 113
Kanin, Garson 9, 140, 147-148, 205-216
Keaton, Buster 101
Kelly, Gene 146, 194
Kennedy, John F. 27
Kid, The 99
King of Kings, The 20, 26
Kiss Hollywood Good-by 45
Kiss Me, Kate 194
Lady in the Dark 145
Lady of the Night 15
Laemmle, Carl 65, 108
Lasky, Jesse 82, 88
Leave It To Me 194
Lilies of the Field 75
Little American, The 30
Little Foxes, The 8, 152, 161
Little Women (1933) 9, 176-177, 180-181
Lois Weber Productions 108-109
Long, Long Trailer, The 147
Loos, Anita 1, 3, 5-6, 35-45, 65, 67, 89, 97, 188, 202
Los Angeles Times 20, 33, 173
Lost World, The 73, 75
Love, Laughter, and Tears: My Hollywood Story 11, 16, 18
Loy, Myrna 143, 155
Luce, Clare Booth 44
Lying Truth, The 73-74
Maas, Ernest 66
Maas, Frederica Sagor 7, 63-68, 84
Macpherson, Jeanie 1, 6, 20-33, 57-58, 97, 118
Madame’s Cravings 51
Male and Female 28, 30, 32, 118
Marion Fairfax Production 72, 74
Marion, Frances 1-5, 16-18, 40, 88, 91, 97, 105-106, 120-121, 123, 178, 188, 200, 203
Marrying Kind, The 205, 213-214
Marshall Neilan Productions 72-73
Marx Brothers, The 9
Mason, Sarah Y. 9, 175-182
Mathis, June 1, 7, 95-103
May, Elaine 207
Mayer, Louis B. 2, 5
Medicine Man, The 85
Mencken, H. L. 41, 43
Meredyth, Bess 7, 25, 56-62, 203
Metro Goldwyn Mayer (MGM) 1-2, 25, 43, 57-58, 60, 88, 142, 147, 160-161, 177, 190, 202-203, 210-212
Min and Bill 120-121
Minelli, Vincent 146-147
Minter, Mary Miles 27
Miss Fane’s Baby Is Stolen 14
Miss Lulu Bett 126-127
Moon, Lorna 8, 117-124
Murfin, Jane 9, 17, 200-204
Murray, Mae 66
My Favorite Wife 195
My Side 209, 213
Mystery of the Leaping Fish 39
Neilan, Marshall 74, 178
New York Hat, The 37
New York Times 14, 35, 95, 193, 200, 202, 207, 213
New Yorker, The 160, 206
Noah’s Ark 58
Normand, Mabel 11, 16
Old Love For New 14
Old Maid, The 190
Old Wives For New 31
Only A Fireman’s Bride 38
Over Twenty-One 210
Paramount Studios 26, 66, 71, 80, 121, 142, 145, 190
Park, Ida May 8, 77, 133-139
Parker, Dorothy 9, 157-165
Parsons, Louella 128
Pat and Mike 205-207, 212-213
Pathé 25, 133
Phantom Lady 173
Philadelphia Story, The 210
Photoplay 1, 3, 13, 22-23, 39, 137
Pickford, Mary 2, 5, 25, 27, 30, 37, 73, 80, 82, 88, 97, 178
Pirate, The 146
Pitts, ZaSu 2, 178-179, 187
Plastic Age, The 65, 81, 84
Poor Little Rich Girl 2
Poor Simp, The 177-178
Powell, William 140, 195
Price of Silence, The 136
Pulitzer Prize 8-9, 18, 148, 151-152, 183, 190, 194
RKO Pictures 172, 176, 180-181, 201, 203, 209
Reason Why, The 92, 94
Rebecca 169, 172
Red Headed Woman 43-44
Redgrave, Vanessa 154
Reid, Wallace 14
Rex Motion Picture Company 133
Roaring Road, The 71, 73
Rogers, Ginger 145, 148, 203
Rolled Stockings 66
Rosemary’s Baby 9
Russell, Rosalind 13
Saboteur 173
Samson and Delilah 63
San Francisco 45
Saphead, The 101
Schulberg, B.P. 65, 80, 83-84
Screen Writers Guild 1, 143, 145-146, 162, 203
Sea Beast, The 60
Selznick, David O. 17, 169, 176, 178, 181, 189
Sennett, Mack 38, 176
Shady Lady 208
Shearer, Norma 15, 66-67, 202
Sherlock Holmes 73
Shocking Miss Pilgrim, The 66-67
Single Standard, The 15
Skyrocket, The 17-18
Smalley, Phillip 106, 133
Smart Woman 15
Smilin’ Through 202
Solax Studios 52, 54
Some Are Born Great 18
Spewack, Bella 9, 192-199
Spewack, Sam 9, 192-199
St. Johns, Adela Rogers 2, 5-6, 9, 11-18, 67, 98, 200
Star is Born, A (1937) 9, 18, 161
Stevens, George 148
Stewart, Jimmy 144
Stromberg, Hunt 144, 203
Strongheart 9, 200, 202
Such Men Are Dangerous 90
Suspense 107
Suspicion 171-172
Swanson, Gloria 13, 28, 30, 32
Talmadge, Constance 41
Talmadge, Norma 202
Tarzan’s Romance 57
Taylor, William Desmond 11
Ten Commandments, The (1923) 20, 26
Thalberg, Irving 1-2, 43-44, 58, 61, 66, 144
Thin Man, The 8, 143-144, 155
Three Weeks 88, 92
Tiffany Pictures 66
Tony Award 194
Triangle Films 38
True Glory, The 209
Twentieth Century-Fox 148
United Artists 5
Universal Studios 20, 24-25, 57, 107-108, 133-134, 137
Unsell, Eve 7, 77, 80-87
Up Pops The Devil 142, 144
Valentino, Rudolph 1, 60, 97-98, 100
Variety 17, 74, 82, 176-177, 180-181
Vidor, King 88, 178
Vitagraph 201
Walt Disney Studios, The 138
Warner Bros. Studios 138, 190
Warner, Jack 5
Weber, Lois 2-3, 8, 104-111, 133-134
Welcome to Britain, A 195-196
Wharton, Edith 189-190
What Price Hollywood? 9, 17, 200, 203
Whispering Chorus, The 29
Wilder, Thornton 207-208, 214
Wilson, Carey 65
Winchell, Walter 12
Woman of Affairs, A 58, 61
Women, The 44, 45, 202-203
Wonder of Women 58
Woollcott, Alexander 159, 208
Writers Guild of America 7, 65, 71, 84, 147, 203
Writing for the Screen 130-131
yellow peril 7, 83
Zukor, Adolph 27, 82

Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

Also available soon via Amazon.com in Print and eBook editions

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Now Available – Signed Copies of “When Women Wrote Hollywood”

As you may have seen, I received my first box of “When Women Wrote Hollywood” books this week, which means that I can now provide signed copies for all who would like them.

Use the PayPal button below to order, pay and tell me what inscription you would like on your copy. You can use PayPal OR any of your major credit cards.

Now Available - Signed Copies of

Also available soon via Amazon.com in Print and eBook editions