Video: Rose Loves The Doctor from Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A clip from this longer presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

 

Watch this entire presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) speaks on “Feminism in the Whoniverse” of Doctor Who, the BBC television program now in its 50th year. She reviews each of the Doctor’s female companions and speaks on how they are represented in the program and how they represented the women of their respective periods.

Transcript:

…And now we have Russell Davies writing — and writers are very important. We’re going to talk about the writers in a little bit. He brings us the very first episode, of the very first reincarnation of The Doctor. the episode itself is titled “Rose.” It is entirely focused on getting to know this woman — who is not intellectually his match. She’s note well educated. She’s a “shop girl” which is not a great job to have in the world. However, she has — just like in the Disney movie Aladdin, she’s “A Diamond in the Rough.” She has what it takes, but poverty has kept her from obtaining her goals. So this chance to travel with this strange alien dude is a thing she takes. She’s willing to take risks in life and she makes a choice to better her life by attending this trip with The Doctor.

Feminism in the Whoniverse was presented at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library where Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

This is the 4th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who that Dr. Welch has presented. You can find these talks using the links below.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

Video: Eastern Philosophies from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

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A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers



Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

Now, we’re going to come to Eastern Philosophies. No, if you know anything about Buddhism, they use this chant to get out of a situation. Obviously, they’re all tied up. The bag guys have taken over for a moment and Micky remembers a chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo and they chant it. When I was a kid I had no what that meant, but I thought to myself — and studying them now — I bet it means something besides gibberish language. As a matter of fact — ooh, how’d that happen? The picture got laid over that — it’s the Lotus Sutra. It’s basically the teaching of The Buddha that all people have the ability to reach enlightenment. In the middle of a TV show with about a bunch of — I mean, come on!

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: Rose and Russell T Davies from Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A clip from this longer presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch


Watch this entire presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) speaks on “Feminism in the Whoniverse” of Doctor Who, the BBC television program now in its 50th year. She reviews each of the Doctor’s female companions and speaks on how they are represented in the program and how they represented the women of their respective periods.

Transcript:

…And now we have Russell Davies writing — and writers are very important. We’re going to talk about the writers in a little bit. He brings us the very first episode, of the very first reincarnation of The Doctor. the episode itself is titled “Rose.” It is entirely focused on getting to know this woman — who is not intellectually his match. She’s note well educated. She’s a “shop girl” which is not a great job to have in the world. However, she has — just like in the Disney movie Aladdin, she’s “A Diamond in the Rough.” She has what it takes, but poverty has kept her from obtaining her goals. So this chance to travel with this strange alien dude is a thing she takes. She’s willing to take risks in life and she makes a choice to better her life by attending this trip with The Doctor.

Feminism in the Whoniverse was presented at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library where Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

This is the 4th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who that Dr. Welch has presented. You can find these talks using the links below.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

Video: How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity: A Study of the Doctors and their Male Companions with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents “How Doctor Who Redefined Masculinity: A Study of the Doctors and their Male Companions” at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library. Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

 Masculinity doctor who

 

This is the 5th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who presented by Dr. Welch. You can find Dr. Welch’s other Doctor Who talks using the links below.

Dr. Rosanne Welch

Follow Dr. Rosanne Welch on the Web and via social media at:

Video: Anti-Materialism from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

Very briefly, anti-materialism. This sign was is their room — their apartment — money is the root of all evil. That’s not what were about at all in this program. In fact, they have this marvelous episode called “The Devil and Peter Tork” which has to with Peter selling his soul to the Devil for the talent of playing a harp which he fell in love with at a pawn shop and in the end, they prove to the Devil — they take the Devil to Court to get his soul back and they say, “You never gave him anything. He had the talent within him all the time. He didn’t want fame and fortune. He just wanted his music.” Right, and I love that. “If you love music, you can play it. All it takes is love.” Here’s the Hippy phrase of the period. “Baby in the final analysis, love is power. That’s where the power is at.” It’s “Make Love, Not War!” I mean, it’s all right there built into the storyline. Of course, and old piece of literature right? We’ve got the Devil.

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: The Last Companions? from Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A clip from this longer presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch


Watch this entire presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) speaks on “Feminism in the Whoniverse” of Doctor Who, the BBC television program now in its 50th year. She reviews each of the Doctor’s female companions and speaks on how they are represented in the program and how they represented the women of their respective periods.

Transcript:

Then Peter meets Peri Brown. Absolutely the worst screamer the show ever had. Poor woman, did nothing but get scared and kidnapped. It was just really — again, a step forward with Nyssa – a step backward with Peri. She hung around with Peter until he regenerated. Not notice we’re getting into the late period here. She ended up hanging out with Colin Baker — not a very popular Doctor. The ratings started to go down and she’s got that whole perky thing going on, right? We move into Sylvester McCoy and his female companion, Ace, who’s a cool pilotly kind of chick, so she’s kind of fun. Sadly, this is the era when the show gets cancelled. Goodbye. 1989. Oh no, no more Doctor Who. Everyone is so sad. Right? Except, this guy Russell T Davies, “I have a plan!”

Feminism in the Whoniverse was presented at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library where Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

This is the 4th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who that Dr. Welch has presented. You can find these talks using the links below.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

Video: …lay down on the grass and be cool. from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

…Also then, they save the plant before the bad human, you know, of course, our boys are the heros. They save the plant and the, the smoke that the plant creates? If you ingest it make you not want to fight anymore — just lay down in the grass and be cool. I mean, if that’s not an anti-authority, let’s all go smoke pot message, I’m no sure… and yet here it is on mainstream television for pre-teens — for 12 to 13-year-olds. 

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: Nyssa from Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A clip from this longer presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch


Watch this entire presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) speaks on “Feminism in the Whoniverse” of Doctor Who, the BBC television program now in its 50th year. She reviews each of the Doctor’s female companions and speaks on how they are represented in the program and how they represented the women of their respective periods.

Transcript:

Tegan comes alone and Tegan is pretty tough, pretty bossy, so they have to soften that. She can’t regenerate, because she’s not a Time Lord, so we’re going to add a second companion in this period, the lovely Nyssa. Nyssa of Traken. She’s an alien. Another chance to have an alien character coming with us. She’s actually a really cool character. She looks like she’s not real tough, because she’s got the fluffy hair thing going on, but in fact, not only is she equally intellectual to The Doctor, being an alien, she can match him culturally. He can’t think he’s better, right? “Humans are so much less than a Time Lord.” Well, her people are just as good as a Time Lord. They have a nice balance going on there and when you put them together, she’s a soft person to look at, but she’s a very tough character. She pulls him into place often and she’s younger than he is. So being younger she still has that mantle of wisdom that she brings to the story. Even to the point that, when it’s time for her character to leave the show, she doesn’t leave for a dude alone — she does meet a guy on a planet, but he’s a doctor and their planet is kind of like a leper colony and there’s been this disease affecting people fro many years and she wants to stay and help find a cure so the people on this planet can be healed. so, she has a social justice cause in her life. She gives up traveling, having a good time in the Tardis, to go do something of value in the world. 

Feminism in the Whoniverse was presented at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library where Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

This is the 4th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who that Dr. Welch has presented. You can find these talks using the links below.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

Video: Fanfiction Workshop with Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Melissa D. Aaron at Cal Poly Pomona

Fanfiction Workshop with Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Melissa D. Aaron at Cal Poly Pomona 

Fan Fiction Workshop

Slide1

 

Known for their popular “Doctor Who” and “Harry Potter” lectures held at the CalPoly Pomona library, Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) and Dr. Melissa Aaron hosted a workshop on writing Fan Fiction in the Special Collections room of the campus library to celebrate April’s National Library Week and the “Unlimited Possibilities @ your library.”

The two professors and professed followers of fan fiction spoke about the history, style and variety of this popular form of writing and then lead the audience with prompts for a few drabbles (flash fan fic of 100 words written in 5 minutes). Thanks to all who participated and to Special Collections Librarian Natalie Lopez for inviting us!


Further reading and resources

Saundra Marshak and Myrna Culbreath, Star Trek: The New Voyages

Henry Jenkins. Convergence Culture. NYU Press: New York, 2006. See also his web page, Confessions of an Aca-Fan: http://henryjenkins.org

The Organization For Transformative Works: http://transformativeworks.org

Jamison, Anne. Fic: Why fanfiction is taking over the world. SmartPop: Dallas, TX, 2013. See also her student’s research on Twilight fanfic: http://fiftyshadesofpopculturetheory.blogspot.com/2012/03/welcome-to-engl-5960-summer-2010-aka.html and her tumblr: http://professorfangirl.tumblr.com.

“A Fair-y Use Tale.” http://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/blog/2007/03/fairy-use-tale


A fanfiction glossary

  • Fic: short for fanfiction. 
  • Canon: The source material and that which is agreed to be fact within it.
  • Fanon: Popular fandom ideas, usually arising from a seminal fanwork: e.g. nicknames, character traits or relationships (see Shipping.) May become canon.
  • Crossover: Works in which the characters or settings from two or more works are combined. 
  • AU: Alternate universe. Works based on a what-if scenario, or in which a critical change has been made.
  • Gen fic: “Generic” fanfiction; stories with no romance. 
  • Shipping: Short for “relationshipping.” Romance fics featuring characters that might or might not be romantically involved in the source material.
    • Canon ship: Characters are romantically involved in the source material. 
    • Fanon ship: Characters are not demonstrably romantically involved in the source material, but wildly popular among fans or a group of fans. 
    • Slash: Same-sex romantic relationships, generally not canon, or not provably so. IMPORTANT: slash is not the same thing as porn. A slash fic might feature a same sex relationship with little or no physicality. Porn is simply porn, and may include nearly any characters or group of characters of any gender.
    • Crack ship: Relationship portrayed is unlikely, bizarre, or ridiculous, e.g., the Whomping Willow and the Giant Squid.
    • Mary Sue: An original character, frequently a self-insert. The single most defining characteristic of a Mary Sue is to warp the canon universe and its characters to center around the new character. The character may be ridiculously skilled beyond age or experience, or all the characters may be in love with him or her. He or she often has a tragic past. Eyes that change color according to his or her moods are a warning sign. 
  • Fanfiction.net: Also known as the Pit Of Voles, this is probably the largest single repository of fanfiction on the web, and also probably its least discriminating. 
  • TV Tropes: A wiki collecting fandom tropes from a variety of media. Valuable, but also a dangerous time sink.

Music: “Brittle Rille” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License.

Video: Zor and Zam from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers



Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

Here is a lovely little bit of dialog. “They want to put the blame on teenagers. Take the war, for example. Whose fault is it? Not ours. We’re not fighting. It must be those crazy kids. They’re the ones doing all the fighting.” I mean, this is not just vaudeville happening. This is serious political commentary in the course of a teenage comedy show. You didn’t get that on Full House when that was the big program in American television. Now, my favorite funny part is in the very last episode of the show, so they got away with a lot. It starred this alien plant. If you look at it a little more closely, it resembles a plant that one wasn’t supposed to know much about. In fact, only in certain state now are we supposed to know about it. This plant has come and its power is being taken over by a bad human who’s using it to rule the world. Right? I think that’s funny. In the midst of this particular episode, they even have this anti-war song that they chant during a montage in the show and if you just take a peek at that for a minute, it’s kind of beautiful. I particularly like the last line, “Two little kinds playing a game. They gave a war and nobody came, ” which is the — it starts with a game and no one shows up, so the 2 kings are all alone. So, here we have this marvelous anti-war song in the midst of this.

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.