New Journal of Screenwriting Arrives With Lots of Information!

New Journal of Screenwriting Arrives With Lots of Information!

Jos new zealand

It’s always fun when a new issue of the Journal of Screenwriting arrives in my mailbox, but this one’s pleasing on several fronts.

First, in my capacity as Book Reviews Editor, I’m able to publish several of my now-graduated students, often for the first time. 

In this issue I am also the co-author of an article extolling the marvelously successful conference held at Otago University in 2017.  

Also, two of the articles come from that conference – one by  my friend Carmen Sofia Brenes (Chairperson, full professor of poetics and screenwriting at the School of Communication of Universidad de los Andes) is about the 2016 film Jackie, about the life of American icon Jackie Kennedy, written by an American, Noah Oppenheim, and directed by Chilean Pablo Lorrain.

The second article is (not so jokingly) “10 Ways to f#ck up Your Female Characters” by two New Zealand female producers, Fiona Samuel and Kathryn Burnett. I’ve already talked about that one with many an MFA student. 

Ask your local university library to carry a subscription to the Journal of Screenwriting so you can read all the issues when they come out quarterly!

Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting Mini Alumni Meetup

Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting Mini Alumni Meetup

Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting Mini Alumni Meetup

I had such a fun catch up lunch with 2017 Stephens MFA alums and Val yesterday at, of all places, IKEA because alum Amy Banks was in town to attend an all day workshop at the Disney Studios for writers with First Nation backgrounds (in their continued work to provide diversity on their channel).

Amy set it up with me and fellow mentor, Val Woods. Then alums Julie Berkobien and Lauren Smith were also free to drop by. I loved hearing about the various work they were all doing and how their MFAs both helped them get hired and, more importantly, helped them excel in their new positions! It also served as an accidental reunion of several writers of our When Women Wrote Hollywood book of essays, which we will be launching to the Columbia, Missouri community in just a few weeks, during the Citizen Jane Film Festival!

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Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood – 8 in a series – Strong Willed Woman

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood - 8 in a series - Strong Willed Woman

Get your copy today!

“Frederica Sagor Maas moved to Hollywood in 1924 and as was true for many young women, those who were considered good looking were pushed towards being seen on screen. Being the strong willed woman that she was, Mass decided she still wanted to be a writer.”

The Best Revenge Is Outliving Them All: The life and heartbreak of Frederica Sagor Maas
Mikayla Daniels


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 33 in a series – The Little Foxes (1941) – Wr: Lillian Hellman

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 33 in a series – The Little Foxes (1941) – Wr: Lillian Hellman

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 33 in a series -  The Little Foxes (1941) - Wr: Lillian Hellman

The Little Foxes (1941) is an American drama film directed by William Wyler. The screenplay by Lillian Hellman is based on her 1939 play The Little Foxes. Hellman’s ex-husband Arthur Kober, Dorothy Parker and her husband Alan Campbell contributed additional scenes and dialogue.[2]

The title comes from Chapter 2, Verse 15 in the Song of Solomon in the King James version of the Bible, which reads, “Take us the foxes, the little foxes, that spoil the vines: for our vines have tender grapes.”[3] The same passage also inspired the title of an unrelated film, Our Vines Have Tender Grapes.

Southern aristocrat Regina Hubbard Giddens (Bette Davis) struggles for wealth and freedom within the confines of an early 20th-century society where a father considered only sons as legal heirs. As a result, her avaricious brothers, Benjamin (Charles Dingle) and Oscar (Carl Benton Reid), are independently wealthy, while she must rely for financial support upon her sickly husband Horace (Herbert Marshall), who has been away undergoing treatment for a severe heart condition. — Wikipedia 

More about The Little Foxes (1941)

More about Lillian Hellman

More books by and about Lillian Hellman


Buy a signed copy of when Women Wrote Hollywood

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 32 in a series – Lillian Hellman

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 32 in a series – Lillian Hellman

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 32 in a series - Lillian Hellman

Lillian Florence Hellman (June 20, 1905 – June 30, 1984) was an American dramatist and screenwriter known for her success as a playwright on Broadway, as well as her left-wing sympathies and political activism. She was blacklisted after her appearance before the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC) at the height of the anti-communist campaigns of 1947–52. Although she continued to work on Broadway in the 1950s, her blacklisting by the American film industry caused a drop in her income. Many praised Hellman for refusing to answer questions by HUAC, but others believed, despite her denial, that she had belonged to the Communist Party.

As a playwright, Hellman had many successes on Broadway, including Watch on the Rhine, The Autumn Garden, Toys in the Attic, Another Part of the Forest, The Children’s Hour and The Little Foxes. She adapted her semi-autobiographical play The Little Foxes into a screenplay, which starred Bette Davis and received an Academy Award nomination in 1942.

Hellman was romantically involved with fellow writer and political activist Dashiell Hammett, author of the classic detective novels The Maltese Falcon and The Thin Man, who also was blacklisted for 10 years until his death in 1961. The couple never married — Wikipedia 

More about Lillian Hellman

More books by and about Lillian Hellman


Buy a signed copy of when Women Wrote Hollywood

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Event: How Star Wars Changed Films Forever with Dr. Rosanne Welch, Cal State Fullerton, October 25, 2018 at Noon

How Star Wars Changed Films and Fandom Forever with Dr. Rosanne Welch, Cal State Fullerton, October 25, 2018 at Noon

How Star Wars Changed Films Forever with Dr. Rosanne Welch, Cal State Fullerton, October 25, 2018 at Noon

Date: Thursday, October 25, 2018
Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Location: Special Events Room 4829, Cal State Fullerton Pollack Library, 800 N State College Blvd, Fullerton, CA 92831
Campus: Building 15

In her talk screenwriter and professor Rosanne Welch will discuss everything Star Wars from George Lucas to Leigh Brackett to Lawrence Kasdan. From Luke Skywalker to Han Solo to Lando Calrissian (both original and prequel versions) to Poe. From Leia Organa to Rey to Jyn Erso. From Jaws to the whole Star Wars franchise to Raiders of the Lost Ark in a look at how Star Wars changed films and fandom forever.

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood – 7 in a series – “From acting to screenwriting”

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood - 7 in a series -

“In 1911, Meredyth began working as an extra at the Biograph Company, and eventually wound up as a stock player for D.W. Griffith. In addition to acting at Biograph, she also began to write and direct one- and two-reeler films. It had occurred to Meredyth that she could make more money if she both wrote and acted, so she began doing so for several different studios.”

You’d Better Learn to Hold Your Liquor: Bess Meredyth and A Career in Early Hollywood
Sydney Haven


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 31 in a series – “The Diary of Anne Frank”, Wr: Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett

To highlight the wonderful yet largely forgotten work of a collection of female screenwriters from the early years of Hollywood (and as a companion to the book, When Women Wrote Hollywood) we will be posting quick bits about the many films they wrote along with links to further information and clips from their works which are still accessible online. Take a few moments once or twice a week to become familiar with their names and their stories. I think you’ll be surprised at how much bold material these writers tackled at the birth of this new medium. — Rosanne Welch

When Women Wrote Hollywood – 31 in a series – “The Diary of Anne Frank”, Wr: Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett

When Women Wrote Hollywood - 30 in a series -

The Diary of Anne Frank is a 1959 film based on the Pulitzer Prize winning play of the same name, which was based on the diary of Anne Frank. It was directedby George Stevens, with a screenplay by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. It is the first film version of both the play and the original story, and features three members of the original Broadway cast.

The film was based on the personal diary of Anne Frank, a Jewish girl who lived in hiding with her family during World War II. All her writings to her diary were addressed as “Dear Kitty”. It was published after the end of the war by her father, Otto Frank (played in the film by Joseph Schildkraut, also Jewish). All of his family members had been killed by the Nazis. The film was shot on a sound stage duplicate of the factory in Los Angeles, while exteriors were filmed at the actual building in Amsterdam.[3]

The film won three Academy Awards in 1960, including Best Supporting Actress for Shelley Winters. In 2006, it was honored as the eighteenth most inspiring American film on the list AFI’s 100 Years…100 Cheers. — Wikipedia 

More about The Diary of Anne Frank (1959)

More about Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett

Biography of Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett


Buy a signed copy of when Women Wrote Hollywood

 

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Want to go backstage at the Stephens MFA? Apply Now! [Video]

Want to go backstage at the Stephens MFA?

Check out this video to see what our program is like and apply now with no application fees until the end of October!

Stephens behind scenes

More information about the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting

Master of Fine Arts in TV and Screenwriting 

You have stories to tell. We’re here to make it happen. Come to Hollywood to learn from some of the best working writers in the industry. Stephens is an institution on a mission: To increase the voices and impact of women in television and film.

WHY STEPHENS?

Our program — with its bold, daring mission — has drawn the attention and the support of some of the most successful and well-known writers in Hollywood. Our faculty includes some of the best working writers in the profession, and our curriculum includes an in-depth look at the business side of TV and screenwriting.  Explore more: program highlights, student achievements and stories. 

HOW DOES IT WORK?

Stephens is proud to be the first college in the nation to offer a low-residency MFA program specifically for TV and screenwriting. Our students come to Los Angeles twice a year for 10-day workshops at the beautiful Jim Henson Studio. Between workshops, students work one-on-one online with at least four different mentors over two years. Two years + four workshops in Hollywood = your M.F.A.

Learn More

Citizen Jane Film Festival Information and a Mention of “When Women Wrote Hollywood” Book Signing During the Festival

The “When Women Wrote Hollywood” Book Signing gets a quick mention this video from the Columbia Missouri Office of Cultural Affairs. They speak with Citizen Film Festival Director Barbie Banks about the festival and what is expected this year.

As in past years, my Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting students will presenting on important women screenwriters during the festival, too. — Rosanne

Get more Book Signing Event info and RSVP