Anderson Cooper pays tribute to his mom, Gloria Vanderbilt via CNN

Who doesn’t love men who love their Moms – and have this extraordinary opportunity to celebrate their lives through the use of their own art – and position – in life?  — Rosanne

Anderson Cooper pays tribute to his mom, Gloria Vanderbilt via CNN

Anderson Cooper pays tribute to his mom, Gloria Vanderbilt via CNN


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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Remember to Credit The Screenwriter!

Remember to Credit The Screenwriter!

While we at Screenwriting Research Network strive to force a focus on screenwriters, we need allies in the non-academic world to properly credit them.

In that vein, I recently wrote to the Guardian’s film critic about a moment in his review of ‘Gangs of New York’ where he credited the director for a visual moment that occurred, clearly and firstly, in the original script — something that happens far too frequently. Often, such letters yield nothing outside of getting the issue off my chest, but today I received this response:

“Dear Dr Welch: many thanks for your email, which has been passed on to me. Your comment is entirely fair: I should have credited this moment to the screenwriters: Jay Cocks, Steven Zaillian and Kenneth Lonergan. With all good wishes,”

I received this response after sending this email to The Guardian’s film desk:

“As a professor of Screenwriting History for an MFA program in the U.S. I greatly enjoy sharing your reviews of American films with my students, so I hope you don’t mind my noting a small mistake I found while researching your review of Gangs of New York – but again, being a professor of Screenwriting History (not film history because film history is the history of directors) I found you fell victim to one of the age-old issues of the old auteur theory. You credited a visual moment to the director when, in fact, it had existed in the original script, therefore the credit ought to have gone to the writer(s) and their imaginations and use of quality research.” 

“The streets erupt in a saturnalia of lawlessness, to which the director adds an inspired touch: an escaped elephant from Barnum’s circus trumpeting down the rubble-strewn streets.”

Yet that elephant was in the script (which I researched at the WGA Library in Los Angeles) all along, as you can see:

“116 EXT. CANAL STREET DAWN

The first thing we see is an ELEPHANT, who trumpets fearfully at the sudden sound of the shattered door. The gang stops, wary of this huge refugee from Barnum’s Museum, but the animal is more frightened of them. It hurries on down the street…”

I only make this point because those kinds of errors lead to the continued idea that directors are the only authors of a film – an idea most film programs are debunking by the day. I hope critics (since they are also writers) will remember screenwriters more prominently in their work in the future. I have taken to reminding people that, when you speak of your favorite films you rarely recount memorable camera angles, but in fact you recount your favorite dialogue and that is the realm of the writer. Often, as in this instance, many of the visuals credited to directors were first imagined by writers as well.

Dr. Rosanne Welch

“When Women Wrote Hollywood” In The News! – Righting history: Book by Stephens students elevates women screenwriters via Columbia Daily Tribune

When I learned that our humble little book about female screenwriters from Hollywood’s golden era, When Women Wrote Hollywood,  had been named runner-up for the Susan Koppelman Award (an honor bestowed upon the “best anthology, multi-authored, or edited book in feminist studies in popular and American culture” by the Popular Culture Association of America) I immediately “Alerted the Media!” 

Happily, Aarik Danielsen, Arts and Music Editor for the Columbia Tribune responded, interviewed a couple of our contributors and produced a great article that you can now read. Then, as they say, you can “Buy That Book!” by clicking here and learn more about the many female screenwriters of Hollywood’s golden era!

Thanks Aarik – and thanks to all the contributors scattered across America.

Righting history: Book by Stephens students elevates women screenwriters

On a smash hit from 2011, pop luminary Beyonce engages in a subversive act of call-and-response.

“Who run the world?” she asks. The chant comes back, time and again: “Girls!”

Who wrote the films that entrenched Hollywood as a cultural force? A book written by Stephens College students creates its own antiphony, calling back with a confident answer: women.

W3h columbia

“When Women Wrote Hollywood: Essays on Female Screenwriters in the Early Film Industry” elevates an important moment in cinema history. Despite the complicated, often exasperating, treatment of women in Hollywood, the collection reminds us that prior to World War II, women were a prominent creative force, penning some of the era’s most memorable films.

Released last summer, “When Women Wrote Hollywood” recently was named runner-up for the Susan Koppelman Award, an honor bestowed upon the “best anthology, multi-authored, or edited book in feminist studies in popular and American culture.”

Read the entire article


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Pioneer Screenwriter Lois Weber’s Birthplace Honored With Pennsylvania Historical Marker

It has taken too long but finally many of the female screenwriters that appear in our collection are being recognized – and often honored. Such is the case with Lois Weber who birthplace has now been given a historical marker. She deserves it.

Read more about her in Chase Thompson’s chapter on Weber in When Women Wrote Hollywood. — Rosanne


Senator Costa Announces New Historical Marker in Pittsburgh

220px LoisWeberPittsburgh, Pa. − March 29, 2018 − Senate Democratic Leader Jay Costa, Jr. today announced the addition of an official Pennsylvania Historical Marker in Pittsburgh: film director Lois Weber.

Lois Weber was the first American woman film director and a pioneer in early film making.

In the era of silent films, she mastered superimposition, double exposures, and split screens to convey thoughts and ideas rather than words on title cards. She also used the nude female figure in the 1915 film Hypocrites and took on progressive and provocative topics, inciting both censorship and artistic praise.

“Lois Weber was a trailblazer for women and all filmmakers in the early 20th century,” said Senator Costa. “She is a worthy addition to this exclusive list.”

Her historical marker will be placed at 1230 Federal Street in Pittsburgh, in front of the new Carnegie Free Library Allegheny. She was born three blocks south of the spot and her childhood home was one block east.

The new markers, selected from 51 applications, will be added to the nearly 2,300 familiar blue-with-gold-lettering signs along roads and streets throughout Pennsylvania.

Read Senator Costa Announces New Historical Marker in Pittsburgh


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood or Buy the Book on Amazon

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs

** Many of these books may be available from your local library.
Check it out! † Available from the LA Public Library

“When Women Wrote Hollywood” selected as runner-up for the Popular Culture Association’s Susan Koppelman Award

The Popular Culture Association has named When Women Wrote Hollywood: Essays on Female Screenwriters in the Early Film Industry runner-up for the Susan Koppelman Award, given to the best anthology, multi-authored, or edited book in feminist studies in popular and American culture.  

Congratulations to all the writers who contributed chapters and many thanks to Cari Beauchamp for her wonderful Forward!  It was a pleasure putting this collection together and continues to be a pleasure sharing the stories of these trailblazing women with the world.  Thanks to McFarland for believing in this project from the start.

 

Females, fiction and uprising in the Poly Post, Cal Poly Pomona

Cal Poly Student journalist Daniela Avila did a great job summing up the points I made in my recent library lecture on my favorite female science fiction writers.  — Rosanne


Females, fiction and uprising in the Poly Post, Cal Poly Pomona

Females, fiction and uprising in the Poly Post, Cal Poly Pomona

Education on the role of women in science fiction — which has been gravely overlooked — was brought by Rosanne Welch at Cal Poly Pomona’s University Library last Thursday, April 25.

Welch discussed several different women in this genre.

Not only in books and written works, but also in television and movies.

She was very passionate about the subject and the significance of women in the genre which many fail to acknowledge.

“It’s a place where audiences and writers go to discuss the issues of the world in a safe place,” Welch said, in regards to science fiction.

Welch began the lecture with the woman that started it all — Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. Shelley is responsible for writing the famous novel “Frankenstein.”

This was written in 1818; however, she asked that the book remained anonymous due to the reactions of a woman writing such a dark and challenging work. Her intentions were to sit back and wait for the book to be judged based off of merit not the author.

It wasn’t until 1823 that her name was placed on the cover.

Read Females, fiction and uprising by Daniela Avila in Poly Post


Watch the entire presentation here!

The Sisterhood of Science Fiction: A Walk Through Some Writers and Characters You (Should) Know And Love

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MuJ-Wxpjng

 

The Sisterhood of Science Fiction: A Walk Through Some Writers and Characters You (Should) Know And Love



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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Join me at the Paperback L.A. #3 Anthology Launch Party, May 5, 2019 [Event]

If you’ll be in Los Angeles on Sunday May 5th and want to see the architecture of the Helms Bakery – come to the Launch party for the 3rd book in the Paperback LA anthology – the editor, Susan LaTempa, reprinted my article about the writers of The Monkees TV show since that is so iconic LA. — Rosanne

Join me at the Paperback L.A. #3 Anthology Launch Party, May 5, 2019 [Event]

Join us for a reception and brief readings to celebrate the launch of Paperback L.A. Book 3 A Casual Anthology: Secrets. SigAlerts. Ravines. Records.

This is the third volume of the acclaimed new-school trilogy the creates a freewheeling mosaic of the city in words and photographs.

Join contributors including Lisa See, Alexandra Hedison, River Garza, Ann Elliott Cutting, Lou Mathews, Rosanne Welch, RJ Smith and Warren Hill for brief readings and views of photos. Culver City Councilmembers Meghan Sahli-Wells and Daniel Lee will welcome attendees.

Free and open to the public.

The book launch is at the Helms Design Center event space, 8745 Washington Blvd., Culver City CA. 90232.

Parking is available at complimentary parking lots located at the Helms Bakery entrance on the south side of Venice Boulevard at Helms Avenue (in front of Rejuvenation and across from Father’s Office) for your visit.

Additional lots are located on the northeast and northwest corners of Helms Avenue and Venice Boulevard.

Rosanne and “When Women Wrote Hollywood” Highlighted on Cal State Fullerton Web Site

How exciting – the folks who man the main website at Cal State Fullerton choseto highlight an article recently written about the book I edited – When Women Wrote Hollywood – on the very, very front of the university website – so when you log on, I’m the one of the first things you see.  Pretty cool. — Rosanne

Rosanne and


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood

or Buy the Book on Amazon

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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Dr. Rosanne Welch’s Essay, “Hey, Hey, They Wrote The Monkees”, Included In Paperback L.A. Book 3!

The lovely thing about putting writing out into the world is that sometimes you receive calls or emails from editors who stumbled upon your work and want to reprint it in their own anthologies.

Such a lovely experience happened to me recently when Susan La Tempa, editor of Paperback LA – a series of 3 anthology collections of writings about Los Angeles across the decades, contacted me. She had read my article on the wild and crazy careers of the former writers of The Monkees and wanted to add it to her 3rd collection. 

Happily, I received my contributor copy in the mail today and it looks great.  The fact that my name appears in a Table of Contents along with great California writers like Casey Williams, Lisa See, Harry Shearer and Jonathon Gold (the only Pulitzer Prize-winning food writer) is… amazing to me.

Can’t wait for the publication launch party, signing and reception Sunday May 5, 2019 (4-6 p.m) at the Helms Design Center.  Free and open to the public!

Hope to see you there!

Secrets. Sigalerts. Ravines. Records.

In Paperback L.A., A Casual Anthology Book 3, our contributors deftly command fiction, nonfiction, playwriting, magazine writing, memoir and other forms to conjure up visions of a Beverly Hills Wonderbread factory, the founding of the first sustained gay rights organization in the country, early 20th-century wagon-train settlers in Dodger Stadium area, a late 20th-century DTLA traffic tie-up that becomes a kind of symphony, a humorous 1940s novelty song whose refrain buoyed civil rights activists, the 1990s outrigger-team apprenticeship of a Tongva youth―and more. Plus, photo essays on “Motion and Stasis,” “Hometown Gold,” “The Right Notes,” and “Nowhere.”

 

 

Faculty Screenwriter and Author Gives Voice to Forgotten Women via California State University Fullerton News Center

Faculty Screenwriter and Author Gives Voice to Forgotten Women via CSUF News Center

Thanks to Karen Lindell for attending my library lecture on When Women Wrote Hollywood at the Pollak Library on the campus of California State University, Fullerton. Her article tries to make sense of the many subjects that have populated my books, and she rightly deduces that it is highlighting the work of women writers that is my main mission.  Even in my book on The Monkees I made sure to fully cover the career of Treva Silverman, who by writing on that show became one of the first women to write for television without a male partner.

Video of “When Women Wrote Hollywood” Coming Soon!

Faculty Screenwriter and Author Gives Voice to Forgotten Women via CSUF News Center

As a young girl in Ohio, Rosanne Welch was a regular at her local library, pouring over autobiographies and memoirs of screenwriters from Hollywood’s early years. By the age of 10, she knew that she wanted to have a career in television or film.

Welch, lecturer in screenwriting at Cal State Fullerton, did make it to Hollywood, where she wrote for television shows “Beverly Hills 90210,” “Picket Fences,” ABC’s “Nightline” and “Touched by an Angel.”

But a funny thing happened on the way to the studio … as Welch prepared for her career, she was surprised to find that the female screenwriters she had read about as a child weren’t mentioned in her screenwriting courses.

This piqued her curiosity. Upon researching the matter, she found several reasons why these women had been sidelined in history.

Faculty Screenwriter and Author Gives Voice to Forgotten Women via CSUF News Center

Read Faculty Screenwriter and Author Gives Voice to Forgotten Women via CSUF News Center

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library