Celebrate International Day of Women and Girls in Science – 11 February 2019

Celebrate International Day of Women and Girls in Science - 11 February 2019

Celebrate International Day of Women and Girls in Science (un.org) by learning more about these amazing Women Scientists and Inventors and Many More in my books. Check your local library or bookstore today!

Maria Mitchell [pronounced “mə-RYE-ə”] (August 1, 1818 – June 28, 1889) was an American astronomer, who in 1847 by using a telescope, discovered a comet, which as a result became known as “Miss Mitchell’s Comet.”[1] She won a gold medal prize for her discovery, which was presented to her by King Frederick VI of Denmark. On the medal was inscribed “Non Frustra Signorum Obitus Speculamur et Ortus” in Latin (taken from Georgics by Virgil (Book I, line 257)[2] (English: “Not in vain do we watch the setting and rising [of the stars]”).[3] Mitchell was the first American woman to work as a professional astronomer.[4][5] –  Wikipedia

* That’s Maria you see center stage on the cover of Technical Innovation in American History above!

Bette Nesmith Graham (March 23, 1924 – May 12, 1980) was an American typist, commercial artist, and the inventor of Liquid Paper. She was the mother of musician and producer Michael Nesmith of The Monkees.[1] Wikipedia

* I researched Bette for Technical Innovation in American History as well as Why The Monkees Matter, talking about her famous musician sone, Michael

Mae Carol Jemison (born October 17, 1956) is an American engineerphysician and NASA astronaut. She became the first African American woman to travel in space when she went into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on September 12, 1992. After medical school and a brief general practice, Jemison served in the Peace Corps from 1985 until 1987, when she was selected by NASA to join the astronaut corps. She resigned from NASA in 1993 to found a company researching the application of technology to daily life. She has appeared on television several times, including as an actress in an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. She is a dancer and holds nine honorary doctorates in science, engineering, letters, and the humanities. She is the current principal of the 100 Year Starship organization. Wikipeda

* Mae appears in both Women in American History and Technical Innovation in American History

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

New Review of “America’s Forgotten Founding Father: A Novel Based on the Life of Filippo Mazzei” from the Historical Novel Society

It’s so nice to see my book on Filippo Mazzei continuing to receive good reviews from the press.  This one comes from website of the Historical Novel Society and seems to like being introduced to such an interesting man as Filippo.

The novel is more of a factual presentation than fictional storytelling; the chronology is interspersed with anecdotal conversations with Franklin, Jefferson, and others involved in the emerging American state. Readers learn about Mazzei’s involvement with the Virginia militia and his work advocating for independence from the British Crown in the Second Continental Congress, conducting business for the colonies in France, and writing essays supporting the American Revolution in the European press after he returns to his homeland.

Buy the book

They cap it off by telling their readers that…

“But the book has a larger focus than Mazzei’s place in the American Revolution. It covers his early years, travels in Turkey, and relationships with family as well as discussions of religion, the prerogatives of landed gentry versus the rights of ordinary people, even the proper pronunciation of Italian words.” 

So glad they noticed that!

Read the entire review on the Historical Novel Society site

Rosanne appears on Cal Poly Pomona College of Education and Integrative Studies (CEIS) Podcast to discuss Interdisciplinary General Education (IGE) [Video] (30 Minutes)

The Dean of the College of Education and Integrative Studies (CEIS) at Cal Poly Pomona (Jeff Passe) asked me to invite 3 IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) students ( Marie Armayin, Ileana Montes and Trejon Hollins) to a podcast about the courses I teach in the IGE and the particular pedagogy we practice (Don’t you just LOVE alliteration?). 

Rosanne appears on Cal Poly Pomona College of Education and Integrative Studies (CEIS) Podcast to discuss Interdisciplinary General Education (IGE) [Video] (30 Minutes)

Subscribe to the Podcast via iTunes | Soundcloud | Stitcher | TuneIn

That video is now available on YouTube and the Cal Poly Pomona CEIS Podcast Page. It’s a great way to capture the experience of some of my more expressive and interesting students in the middle of their educational journeys – and to demonstrate the idea of being able to articulate your values and ideas in public, a ‘soft skill’ we all can use for the rest of our lives. I often argue that these soft skills make the difference between acing a job interview (and later the career) and not because everyone who comes to an interview has a matching resume of accomplishment so it’s how they handle those soft skills that wins the race.

Our books, Women in American History, named to ALA’s 2018 list of Best Historical Materials

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

My co-editor Peg Lamphier and I are honored to have awoken this morning to this lovely email telling us that our book, Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection, has been named to the American Library Association’s 2018 list of Best Historical Materials.  

“The list recognizes effectiveness in coverage of historical resources in all fields of history and promotes enhanced availability  of historical works and information, and is published in Reference and User Services Quarterly (RUSQ).  These sources are selected by the Historical Materials committee that seeks to improve the usefulness of bibliographies, historical materials, and indexes in the field of history and shared among bibliographers, indexers, publishers, and professional associations.”

Since both of us have our PhDs in American History – and we both have taught Women’s HIstory at one time or another (on top of our other courses) — this is a most wonderful acknowledgment of all the time we took to make sure as many women from as many multicultural backgrounds — and as many new documents (not merely retreads from past books) could be included.  Of course, we also have to thank the many professional editors at ABC-Clio who helped proof and copyedit and cull permissions for all that material. It truly was a team effort.

Women in American History named to ALA's 2018 list of Best Historical Materials

Dear Dr. Welch:

            I am writing as a representative of the Historical Materials Committee of the Reference and User Services Association, a division of the American Library Association.  It is my pleasure to inform you that your book, Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection, has been named to the 2018 list of Best Historical Materials. 

The list recognizes effectiveness in coverage of historical resources in all fields of history and promotes enhanced availability of historical works and information, and is published in Reference and User Services Quarterly (RUSQ).  These sources are selected by the Historical Materials committee that seeks to improve the usefulness of bibliographies, historical materials, and indexes in the field of history and shared among bibliographers, indexers, publishers, and professional associations.

Congratulations on your remarkable contributions to scholarly literature.

 

Sincerely,

Steven A. Knowlton

Women Rock! First Female Doctor Who premiere hist 10 year ratings high!

Women Rock! First Female Doctor Who premiere hist 10 year ratings high!

Folks (mostly male critics) predicted 5 million in the overnights – she it 8 million+

New Essay in Outside In: OUTSIDE IN TAKES A STAB: 139 New Perspectives on 139 Buffy Stories by 139 Writers – Pre-Order – Available Nov 2, 2018

I was given the grand job of writing about HUSH for this collection – so I published my Buffy 4-act structure lecture, which they found unique and which I continue to use as an opening lecture to each of my one-hour drama classes every semester. — Rosanne


Outside In Stab CoverOUTSIDE IN TAKES A STAB: 139 New Perspectives on 139 Buffy Stories by 139 Writers

This item will be released on November 2, 2018.Celebrating over 25 years of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, OUTSIDE IN TAKES A STAB is a collection of 139 reviews, one for every story of the television series, plus the movie and a couple extras. Featuring contributions from Susanne Lambdin, Jill Sherwin, Rosanne Welch, Keith R.A. DeCandido, Robert Greenberger, Rich Handley, David A. McIntee, and over a hundred more!

Pre-order Today!

New Podcast: Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone – Check it out!

Check out comedian (and friend to the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting program) Paula Poundstone’s new podcast Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone. She’ll be holding entertaining and engaging conversations as she interviews experts in various interesting fields.

New Podcast: Nobody Listen to Paula Poundstone - Sponsored by The Stephens College MFA In Screenwriting Program

GUESTS
Mario Soto- Sports Psychologist
@mariosportsdoc

Melissa Brandzel – Grammarian
@MediaChickEdits

John Grab – Trombone
John doesn’t have a large social media footprint, but he often plays with The Orchestre Surreal

During this inaugural episode at 19:45 you’ll hear a great add for our Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting – between funny conversations first with sports psychiatrist Mario Soto followed by grammarian Melissa Brandzel. In Paula’s typical style she’s funny off the cuff, finding different comic ways to interpret the helpful tips offered by her experts.

I also noticed this fun request on their website…

“We need a theme song!  We launched this show without a theme song, and are turning to YOU, dear listener, to find one. If you have a tune in your head that you think should kick off our show each week, please reach out to us via our website.” So if you’re a local musician, check it out – and leave them a comment if you happen to be an expert in some fun field. Maybe they’ll have you on the show!

Visit the Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone Web Site to subcribe via iTunes or your favorite Podcast program

Find out more about the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting

Find out more about the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting

Josh Greenfield: A Writer’s Life

A beautifully written remembrance from one writer to another – a good read to understand the breadth and depth of a writer’s full life – Josh Greenfield wrote ‘Harry and Tonto’ (with Paul Mazursky, who was one of the co-writers of The Monkees pilot -small world indeed!).  Harry and Tonto is a worthwhile character study film to watch over the summer. Art Carney won an Oscar for it and if you don’t know who Art Carney is…….  🙁 But as you’ll learn when you read this, Greenfield also wrote reviews and books about his autistic son — and was friends with other writers we should already know – from Joan Didion to Mario Puzo to Arthur Miller.

Oddly enough, I have a novel based on the movie in my bookshelf – but nowhere does it say it is based on a movie – and nowhere does the movie identify itself as an adaptation. That makes me wonder if, in 1974, it was still thought that a novel based on a movie wouldn’t be worth reading…  I’ll have to do more research on that! The one (sadly bad) review of the book on Amazon says it is written like a bad dictation from the film. The movie was released August 12th 1974; the book came out earlier, in January of that year. Again, an odd way of doing things. Maybe the film was held up in post production???  

Either way, the movie is GREAT!  And Greenfield seems to have lived a fascinating life as a writer – and as a human.

Rosanne Welch


Film critic Kenneth Turan remembers Josh Greenfeld, a screenwriter who taught him about life

Film critic Kenneth Turan remembers Josh Greenfeld, a screenwriter who taught him about life

I always knew I’d write about my friend Josh Greenfeld. I even started to take notes, long lost, about the piercingly acute things he’d say about Hollywood and the movie business, but I never thought it would be this hard.
Best known in the business as the Oscar-nominated screenwriter of “Harry and Tonto,” the film that won a best acting Oscar for Art Carney in 1974, Josh (who died last month at age 90) was an under-the-radar insider and consummate professional, deft, gifted and successful in a wide range of writing disciplines.

Read the entire article – Film critic Kenneth Turan remembers Josh Greenfeld, a screenwriter who taught him about life


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A Star is Born – Yet another new version of an old classic

Dorothy Parker’s story is such a classic it keeps being made and remade across the decades – first adapted by Moss Hart, then by Joan Didion and John Gregory Dunne – this time by Eric Roth (Oscar winner for Forest Gump), Bradley Cooper and Will Fetters. THAT is a successful piece of writing. The trailer already has me teared up- that’s how powerful the story still is.

A Star is Born - Yet another new version of an old classic

Video

Books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Today I Became a Citation: Little Women, Feminism and Me!

I usually use Google Alerts to find mentions of The Monkees but this weekend something interesting happened. Google Alerts found my name in an essay on the JSTOR Daily about the new BBC miniseries version of Little Women, adapted by Heidi Thomas of “Call the Midwife”) from a novel by a female writer (Louisa May Alcott, as if you didn’t know) and directed by a woman (Vanessa Caswill). 

My Summer of Watching Little Women by Benjamin Winterhalter

Little women movie 1050x700

The writer of the essay was a male, JSTOR Daily’s features editor Benjamin Winterhalter and he was reminiscing about a summer in his elementary years when his mother and friends dissected all the filmed adaptations of the novel  in preparation for writing an article —  “A Feminist Romance: Adapting Little Women to the Screen”  for Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature. 

Read the Journal Article


Join the Rosanne Welch Mailing List for future book and event announcements!
 

Winterhalter’s article came up because along his research way he came across an Op-Ed I had written for the Los Angeles Times, “What ‘Little Women’ Is Really About” about the 1995 Robin Schiff adaptation (starring Winona Ryder) which I had framed as both a more deeply feminist interpretation but, more importantly, accessible to all as the story of a writer finding their voice.

Today I Became a Citation: Little Women. Feminism and Me!

How fun to be reminded of that Op-Ed and to see how accessible my earlier work can be with archives going digital.  It’s also good timing as I often recommend to screenwriting students that they write for various local publications in order to get their names out there and to fill out their writing CVs.  Here’s an example of a piece I wrote when I had a passionate idea ( the one about how this is more the story of a writer finding their voice than merely a bunch of sisters surviving the Civil War). Since I did not see that idea represented in the mainstream press, I brought it to their attention and they noticed it and presented it to their readers.