From The Research Vault Extra: Tom Petty and The Monkees

In honor of the loss of Tom Petty, I was reminded of his love for Monkees music in this quote I used in Why The Monkees Matter. He will be missed by many. — Rosanne

Tom petty

“In 2013 Tom Petty of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers liked to open concerts with a double dose of Monkee-themed material by playing the Byrds’ 1967 classic “So You Want to Be a Rock ‘n’ Roll Star” back to back with “(I’m Not Your) Stepping Stone.” — Roberts, Randall.  “Review: Deep cuts from Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers at the Fonda.


Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

 

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From The Research Vault: Have yourself a merry atheist Christmas! By Penn Jillette, CNN, 2012

From The Research Vault: Have yourself a merry atheist Christmas! By Penn Jillette, CNN, 2012

 

 From The Research Vault: Have yourself a merry atheist Christmas! By Penn Jillette, CNN, 2012

 

[…]

The Monkees were on TV. They appealed to the broadest audience possible. The Monkees were sanitized. My mom and dad would watch the Monkees with me, and other than their stupid haircuts, Mom and Dad weren’t bothered much by the Pre-fab Four.

Mom and Dad bought me Monkees records. I read Monkees interviews and through them, learned about a guy named Jimi Hendrix who was their opening act in cities I couldn’t get to. I saw Frank Zappa of the Mothers of Invention on the Monkees TV show and in their movie, “Head,” and soon I’d moved from the innocuous to full blown dangerous rock ‘n’ roll. Things that are for everyone sometimes suck us into things that aren’t for everyone.

[…]

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A History of Screenwriting – 40 in a series – The Son of the Sheik – Frances Marion

A History of Screenwriting – 40 in a series – The Son of the Sheik – Frances Marion

A History of Screenwriting - 40 in a series - The Son of the Sheik - Frances Marion

The Son of the Sheik is a 1926 American silent adventure/drama film directed by George Fitzmaurice and starring Rudolph Valentino and Vilma Bánky. The film is based on the 1925 romance novel of the same name by Edith Maude Hull, and is a sequel to the 1921 hit film The Sheik, which also stars Rudolph Valentino.[2] The Son of the Sheik is Valentino’s final film and was released nearly two weeks after his death from peritonitis at the age of 31.

In 2003, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.[3]

At the time of the film’s release, Rudolph Valentino was attempting to make a comeback in films.[4] He rose to international stardom after the release of The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse and The Sheik in 1921, both of which were box office hits and solidified his image as “the Great Lover”.[5] By 1924, however, Valentino’s popularity had begun to wane after he appeared in two box office failures, Monsieur Beaucaire and A Sainted Devil, both of which featured him in roles that were a departure from his “Great Lover” image. He also squabbled over money with Famous Players-Lasky, the studio he was signed to, which eventually led to him walking out on his contract. Famous Players-Lasky eventually released Valentino from his contract and he signed with United Artists in 1925.[4] In an effort to capitalize on the success that Valentino had achieved with The Sheik, United Artists’ president Joseph M. Schenck bought the rights to Edith Maude Hull‘s novel Son of the Sheik and cast Valentino in the dual role of father and son.[2][6]

The novel was adapted for the screen by Frances Marion and Fred de Gresac.[2] The film was shot on location in California and in the Yuma Desert in Arizona.[7] Wikipedia



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I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 75 in a series – Actor vs. Character

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 Quotes from

 

During their 2013 reunion tour blogger Russ Kazmierczak Jr., commented that “the line between the Monkees as actors and their zany onscreen personas was so blurred because they opted to use their real names throughout — a logical choice when establishing a franchised band, but rather short-sighted in retrospect if the guys had any hopes of shedding their Monkee skin later in life. 

 

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

 

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From The Research Vault: The Changing Portrayal of Adolescents in the Media Since 1950 by Patrick Jamieson and Daniel Romer.

From The Research Vault: The Changing Portrayal of Adolescents in the Media Since 1950 by Patrick Jamieson and Daniel Romer.

 

 

Adolescents are eager consumers of mass media entertainment and are particularly susceptible to various forms of media influence, such as modeling, desensitization, and contagion. These once controversial phenomena are now widely accepted along with the recognition that th media are a major socializer of youth

During the economic boom of the post-World War II era, marketers and advertisers identified adolescents as a major audience, which led to the emergence of a pervasive youth culture. Enormous changes ensued in the media’s portrayal of adolescents and the behaviors they emulate. These changes were spurred by increased availability and consumption of television, which joined radio, film, and magazines as major influence on youth. Later, the rapid growth of the video game industry and the internet contributed to the encompassing presence of the media. Today, opportunities for youthful expression about to the point where adolescents can easily create and disseminate content with little control by traditional media gatekeepers.

In The Changing Portrayals of Adolescents in the Media since 1950, leading scholars analyze the emergence of youth culture in music and powerful trends in gender and ethnic-racial representation, sexuality, substance use, violence, and suicide portrayed in the media. This book illuminates the evolution of teen portrayal, the potential consequences of these changes, and the ways policy-makers and parents can respond. — Amazon

 
 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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A History of Screenwriting – 39 in a series – The Poor Little Rich Girl – Frances Marion

A History of Screenwriting – 39 in a series – The Poor Little Rich Girl – Frances Marion

A History of Screenwriting - 39 in a series - The Poor Little Rich Girl - Frances Marion

 

The Poor Little Rich Girl is a 1917 American comedy-drama film directed by Maurice Tourneur. Adapted by Frances Marion from the 1913 play by Eleanor Gates.[1] The Broadway play actually starred future screen actress Viola Dana.[2] The film stars Mary Pickford, Madlaine Traverse, Charles Wellesley, Gladys Fairbanks (returning from the play) and Frank McGlynn, Sr.

The film was shot in Fort Lee, New Jersey when early film studios in America’s first motion picture industry were based there at the beginning of the 20th century.[3][4][5] In 1991, The Poor Little Rich Girl was deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. Wikipedia



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I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 74 in a series – Identity Confusion

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Quotes from  

In the case of The Monkees, identity confusion came from the start since they were not immediately recognized entities coming into the production and the choice was made to use their real names rather than fictional ones. Of the group of them, Dolenz had the greatest chance of being recognized by the television audience due to the two seasons he spent playing Corky on Circus Boy in the late 1950s.

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

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From The Research Vault: Charles M. Schulz: Conversations (Conversations with Comic Artists Series) by M. Thomas Inge

From The Research Vault: Charles M. Schulz: Conversations (Conversations with Comic Artists Series) by M. Thomas Inge

 

Through his comic strip Peanuts, Charles M. Schulz (1922-2000) has left his signatures on American culture–Lucy’s fake hold for the kickoff, Linus’s security blanket, Charlie Brown’s baseball team that never wins a game, and his everyman cry of “Good Grief!”

When Schulz died February 13, 2000, the eve of publication for the last Sunday strip he would draw, the world mourned the passing of a gentle humorist and minimalist innovator, a comic strip artist who had become one of America’s major pop philosophers, theologians, and psychologists in the last half of the twentieth century.

Charles M. Schulz: Conversations reveals that man, open and warm once a conversation began. During his career, his little kid characters and Snoopy and Woodstock appeared for 355 million readers in 2,600 papers in 75 countries, in 30 television specials and four feature films, and in an off-Broadway musical. Selected from over 300 interviews published between 1957 and the present, this collection serves as a celebration of the popular strip’s 50th anniversary on October 2, 2000, and as a lasting tribute to the man friends called “Sparky.”

Schulz talks at length about life, theology, sports, the art of the comic strip, and the human condition in general. He ruminates as well on the origins and the importance of Charlie Brown, Lucy, Snoopy, and friends as icons of the American imagination. America’s most universally admired and respected comic artist talks about how his own life and insecurities have inspired some of his finest moments in comic strip history.

Until Schulz’s retirement, he never missed a deadline and was totally responsible for writing, drawing, and lettering the feature every day, a record matched by no other cartoonist in newspaper history.

Including dozens of classic Peanuts strips, this volume suggests that if we had only one artifact for deposit in a time capsule, something to tell future historians what life in the late twentieth century was all about, we could do no better than to enclose a complete run of Peanuts. — Amazon

 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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A History of Screenwriting – 38 in a series – Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm – Frances Marion

A History of Screenwriting – 38 in a series – Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm – Frances Marion

A History of Screenwriting - 38 in a series - Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm - Frances Marion

Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm is a 1917 American silent comedy-drama film directed by Marshall Neilan based upon the novel of the same name by Kate Douglas Wiggin. This version is notable for having been adapted by famed female screenwriter Frances Marion. The film was made by the “Mary Pickford Company” and was an acclaimed box office hit. When the play premiered on Broadway in the 1910 theater season the part of Rebecca was played by Edith Taliaferro.[1][2][3]

As described in a film magazine,[4] Rebecca Randall (Pickford) is taken into the home of her aunt Hannah (Eddy), a strict New England woman. Rebecca meets Adam Ladd (O’Brien), a young man of the village, and they become great friends. One day Rebecca promises to marry Adam when she becomes of age. Unable to withstand her pranks any longer, her aunt sends her away to a boarding school. She graduates a beautiful young lady. Shortly thereafter, Adam demands a fulfillment of her promise. — Wikipedia



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs *

* Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 


I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 73 in a series – Chaotic Narrative Structure

 

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

 Quotes from

The Monkees might never have planned to have no format but by doing so their chaotic narrative structure mirrored the freewheeling style shared by all the other creative artists contributing to the program. It kept the audience on their toes and kept them feeling fresh. It seems the actors did not recognize the narrative variety the program offered as well as their audience did.

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition