From The Research Vault: How to help horses helped by a Monkee, Statesman Journal

How to help horses helped by a Monkee

Carol McAlice Currie and Michael Davis, Statesman Journal

How to help horses helped by a Monkee

With apologies to the songwriting duo of Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart:

“Here she comes. Walkin’ down the street. She could get the funniest looks from. Ev’ryone she meets.”

But she doesn’t. In fact, rather than monkeying around, Salem author Jerri Keele has been busy writing a book to benefit the Davy Jones Equine Memorial Foundation. (Yes, that Davy Jones, the lead-singing, television heartthrob of ’60s boy band The Monkees).

Read How to help horses helped by a Monkee


Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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A History of Screenwriting – 20 in a series – The Kiss (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1896)

A History of Screenwriting – 20 in a series – The Kiss (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1896)

A History of Screenwriting - 20 in a series - The Kiss (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1896)

From Wikipedia…

The Kiss (also known as The May Irwin KissThe Rice-Irwin Kiss and The Widow Jones) is an 1896 film, and was one of the first films ever shown commercially to the public. Around 18 seconds long, it depicts a re-enactment of the kiss between May Irwin and John Rice from the final scene of the stage musical The Widow Jones. The film was directed by William Heise for Thomas Edison. At the time, Edison was working at the Black Maria studios in West Orange, New Jersey.

In 1999, the short was deemed “culturally significant” by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry.

The film contained the very first kiss on film, with a close-up of a nuzzling couple followed by a short peck on the lips (“the mysteries of the kiss revealed”). The kissing scene was denounced as shocking and obscene to early moviegoers and caused the Roman Catholic Church to call for censorship and moral reform – because kissing in public at the time could lead to prosecution.[1]

The film caused a scandalized uproar and occasioned disapproving newspaper editorials and calls for police action in many places where it was shown. One contemporary critic wrote, “The spectacle of the prolonged pasturing on each other’s lips was beastly enough in life size on the stage but magnified to gargantuan proportions and repeated three times over it is absolutely disgusting.”[2]

The Edison catalogue advertised it this way: “They get ready to kiss, begin to kiss, and kiss and kiss and kiss in a way that brings down the house every time.”

Perhaps in defiance and “to spice up a film”, this was followed by many kiss imitators, including The Kiss in the Tunnel (1899) and The Kiss (1900).


Learn more about Thomas Edison and Early Movies with these books and videos

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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 


I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch

Television is Intimate from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing [Video] (0:47)

This book signing at Book Soup was wonderful – good people, good conversation (before and after the signing). Just another example of the kind of quality positive people who have been drawn to The Monkees across generations – I even met a former head of publicity for ScreenGems who had some fun stories to tell. — Rosanne

Watch this entire presentation

Television is Intimate from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing

 

Transcript:

The thing that I think is special about TV is that if you go to a film, you’ve chosen to pay your money for that message. So, you’re not likely to learn anything new. You’re not likely to believe you’re going to pay for something you don’t wan to be told, but television is intimate. It sneaks into your house when you’re not thinking. When you kid switches the channel and suddenly new messages come to them that you might never have wanted them to hear and that’s what The Monkees were doing. They were embedding some new political ideas into the 13 and 14-year-olds who were watching the show at that time and if you think about it, we’re in 1966, give those kids 5 or 6 years and they’re the ones protesting the Vietnam War in the 70’s. That’s when the big protests hit. So, this is a period that The Monkees falls into.

Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today!

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

 

 

01 – Introduction: “Why The Monkees Matter” Interview with Jean Hopkins Power [Video] (1:02)

Rosanne Welch talks about “Why The Monkees Matter” with Jean Hopkins Power

Watch this entire presentation (45 mins)

Jean Powergirl takes the host reigns and welcomes her guest Rosanne Welch, PhD to the show! They’ll be discussing Roseanne’s book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture.”

01 - Introduction: “Why The Monkees Matter” Interview with Jean Hopkins Power [Video] (1:02)

 

Transcript:

Hello again, I’m here with Dr. Rosanne Welch. She’s a professor She’s a screenwriter. She’s a producer. She’s this Hollywood lady and she has lots of interesting things to tell us about and I am fascinated. Here’s her book we’re going to talk about today — “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture.” You can go to Amazon.com to get this book and yea, we have lift off now. Let me go ahead and tell you er credentials again because I’m going to have this memorized. I know all about my friend, Rosanne. Alright, she’s a professor at Cal State Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College, and Cal Poly Pomona. She has a Ph.D. in 20th Century United States Film History from Claremont Graduate University and she has a Master of Arts in 20th Century US History from California State University Northridge in 2004. She’s a writer. She’s a producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210, CBS’ Emmy-winning Picket Fences and Touched by and Angel.

Get your copy today!

A hit television show about a fictitious rock band, The Monkees (1966-1968) earned two Emmys–Outstanding Comedy Series and Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy. Capitalizing on the show’s success, the actual band formed by the actors, at their peak, sold more albums than The Beatles and The Rolling Stones combined and set the stage for other musical TV characters from The Partridge Family to Hannah Montana. In the late 1980s, the Monkees began a series of reunion tours that continued into their 50th anniversary.

This book tells the story of The Monkees and how the show changed television, introducing a new generation to the fourth-wall-breaking slapstick created by Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers. Its creators contributed to the innovative film and television of 1970s with projects like Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Laugh-In and Welcome Back, Kotter. Immense profits from the show, its music and its merchandising funded the producers’ move into films such as Head, Easy Rider and Five Easy Pieces.

Rosanne Welch, PhD has written for television (Touched by an Angel, Picket Fences) and print (Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space). In the documentary world she has written and produced Bill Clinton and the Boys Nation Class of 1963 for ABC NEWS/Nightline and consulted on PBS’s A Prince Among Slaves, the story of a prince from West Africa who was enslaved in the 1780s, freed by order of President John Quincy Adams in the 1820s and returned to his homeland.

From The Research Vault: The Invention of Teenagers: LIFE and the Triumph of Youth Culture

The Invention of Teenagers: LIFE and the Triumph of Youth Culture

Ben Cosgrove, Time, September 28. 2013

From The Research Vault: The Invention of Teenagers: LIFE and the Triumph of Youth Culture

Historians and social critics differ on the specifics of the timeline, but most cultural observers agree that the strange and fascinating creature known as the American teenager — as we now understand the species — came into being sometime in the early 1940s. This is not to say that for millennia human beings had somehow passed from childhood to adulthood without enduring the squalls of adolescence. But the modern notion of the teen years as a recognized, quantifiable life stage, complete with its own fashions, behavior, vernacular and arcane rituals, simply did not exist until the post-Depression era.

Here, in the first of a series of galleries on the evolution of LIFE magazine’s — and, by extension, America’s — view of teenagers through the middle part of the 20th century, LIFE.com presents photos that the inimitable Nina Leen shot for a December 1944 article, “Teen-Age Girls: They Live in a Wonderful World of Their Own.”

Read The Invention of Teenagers: LIFE and the Triumph of Youth Culture on Time


Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

Order Your Copy Now!

A History of Screenwriting – 19 in a series – The boxing cats (Prof. Welton’s)

 A History of Screenwriting – 19 in a series – The boxing cats (Prof. Welton’s)

A History of Screenwriting - 19 in a series - The boxing cats (Prof. Welton's)

Title
The boxing cats (Prof. Welton’s)

Other Title
Boxing cats

Summary
From Raff & Gammon price list: A very interesting and amusing subject. $10.00.

Contributor Names
Dickson, W. K.-L. (William Kennedy-Laurie), 1860-1935, production.
Heise, William, camera.
Welton, Henry, cast.
Thomas A. Edison, Inc.
Hendricks (Gordon) Collection (Library of Congress)
Created / Published
United States : Edison Manufacturing Co., [1894]

Subject Headings
– Cats–Training–United States
– Boxing–United States
– Animal fighting
– Animal trainers–United States

Genre
Novelty films
Peep shows (Motion pictures)
Silent films
Nonfiction films

Notes
– Copyright: no reg.
– Featuring: Henry Welton.
– Camera, William Heise.
– Duration: 0:20 at 27 fps.
– MAVIS 179897; The boxing cats (Prof. Welton’s).
– Filmed ca. July 1894, in Edison’s Black Maria studio.
– Sources used: Copyright catalog, motion pictures, 1894-1912; Musser, C. Edison motion pictures 1890-1900, 1997, p. 104-5; Raff & Gammon. Price list of films, ca. June 1895, p. 1 [MI].
– Available also through the Library of Congress Web site as digital files.
– Received: 1994-05-13; viewing print; preservation; Hendricks (Gordon) Collection.
Medium
viewing print 1 film reel of 1 (ca. 33 ft.) : si., b&w ; 35 mm.

Call Number/Physical Location
FEC 8057 (viewing print)

Repository
Library of Congress Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division Washington, D. C. 20540 USA dcu

Digital Id
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mbrsmi/edmp.4020

Library of Congress Control Number
00694112

Online Format
image
video

Description
From Raff & Gammon price list: A very interesting and amusing subject. $10.00.

LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/00694112

Additional Metadata Formats
MARCXML Record
MODS Record
Dublin Core Record 


Learn more about Thomas Edison and Early Movies with these books and videos

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 


I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch

The 60’s Culture and The Monkees from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing [Video] (0:43)

This book signing at Book Soup was wonderful – good people, good conversation (before and after the signing). Just another example of the kind of quality positive people who have been drawn to The Monkees across generations – I even met a former head of publicity for ScreenGems who had some fun stories to tell. — Rosanne

Watch this entire presentation

The 60's Culture and The Monkees from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing

 

Transcript:

…and The Monkees were part of the childish period where they were playing around with what they could do. I think that makes them very special. We think about where we were in 1966. it was only two decades after World War II. People were still holding on to memories of rationing– whether you’re in England or here in the United States — you remembered that period and the United States was  still trying to figure out where it fit in the world. we were becoming a super power, but we didn’t know what that meant and so here come these four kids with the long hair breaking all the rules showing up on television and when you’re supposed to be the nice kids on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet or Leave it to Beaver and that made people sit up and take notice. 

Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today!

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

 

 

Adapting The Martian and Conclusion from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (2:06)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Adapting The Martian and Conclusion from A History of the Art of Adaptation

 

Transcript:

The latest latest is the Martian which is a really interesting book on several levels. You guys know it was self-published and he would put chapters online one chapter at a time and he would take input from people and then he would add that to the stuff he was writing as he went further and he had so much of a following online he was able to take it to publishing companies. They said “well so many people care about what’s happening we’ll try publishing it.” It became a best-seller now of course it’s become a movie with Matt Damon hugely successful the last two three weeks at the box office. It’s been the number one movie. What have they changed? Well happily not too much. In the book they jump right into him being there you know in the movie they have to show you how stuff exploded so it’s big and exciting. That’s why we know he’s stuck at Mars. That’s a small change no one’s too upset. What bothers me is we have another Argo situation. There’s a character in the book named Mindy Park and she is his connection down at NASA right. If I say the last name Park to you does any ethnicity come to mind? Korean-American that’s who she is in the book. In the movie can’t get much blonder than that. Absolutely every bit of ethnicity has been washed out of that character which is amazing because clearly it’s a very successful and popular character inside the novel. Why they didn’t think that they could allow a Korean-American actress to portray here kind of fascinating but also kind of sad because if you don’t read the book you don’t really get the story. and so frankly the moral of the story which I thought was hilarious is actually a book called the moral of the story. The Morel of the Story, you got to read the books. You can’t just see the movies.You have to read the book so you’re not really having the experience that the person wanted you to have and I think that’s the coolest thing because it lets a movie continue to live with you. If you liked it that much you’re going to love the extra details you get inside the book. That’s it. Thank you very much.

Yea!

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

From The Research Vault: The Hollywood Screenwriters: A Film Comment Book. Richard Corliss

The Hollywood Screenwriters: A Film Comment Book. Richard Corliss, Editor.New York:  The Hearst Corporation/Avon Books, 1970.

From The Research Vault: The Hollywood Screenwriters: A Film Comment Book. Richard Corliss

An essential collection of essays, interviews and filmographies, this was a seminal work (and a precursor to Corliss’s 1974 manifesto, Talking Pictures) in terms of bringing the screenwriter out from under the director’s shadow, following a decade of auteurist criticism run rampant. There are essays on Anita Loos, Jules Furthman, Ben Hecht, Preston Sturges and Dudley Nichols; a memoir by Howard Koch about working with Max Ophuls on LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN; interviews with Ring Lardner Jr., Borden Chase, Dalton Trumbo, James Poe, Eleanor Perry and Penelope Gilliatt; a ” Screenwriters Symposium,” featuring twelve noted screenwriters’ answers to a questionnaire (included are Philip Dunne, Norman Krasna, Ernest Lehman and Michael Wilson); and filmographies of fifty prominent screenwriters. The Foreword is by Carl Foreman.


Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

Order Your Copy Now!

A History of Screenwriting – 18 in a series – Fire Rescue Scene (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1894)

I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch


Fire Rescue Scene (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1894) 

Fire Rescue Scene (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1894)

“Firemen in working uniform, rubber coats, helmets, and boots. Thrilling rescue from burning building. Smoke effects are fine.” – from the Edison Catalog

 


Learn more about Thomas Edison and Early Movies with these books and videos

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!