From The Research Vault: Transformations: Identity Construction in Contemporary Culture by Grant David McCracken

Self reinvention has become a preoccupation of contemporary culture. In the last decade, Hollywood made a 500-million-dollar bet on this idea with movies such as Multiplicity, Fight Club, eXistenZ, and Catch Me If You Can. Self reinvention marks the careers of Madonna, Ani DiFranco, Martha Stewart, and Robin Williams. The Nike ads of LeBron James, the experiments of New Age spirituality, the mores of contemporary teen culture, and the obsession with “extreme makeovers” are all examples of our culture’s fixation with change. In a time marked by plenitude, transformation is one of the few things these parties have in common.

Although transformation is widely acknowledged as a defining characteristic of our culture, we have almost no studies on what it is or how it works. Transformations offers the first comprehensive and systematic view. It is an ethnography of the contemporary world. — Amazon


 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

    

 

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Silent Films and Diversity from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

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Silent Films and Diversity from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Silent Films and Diversity from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

 

A recording of my presentation at this year’s University Film and Video Association (UFVA) 2017 conference.

Transcript:

Teaching Silent Films allows you to teach diversity again because there were filmmakers of all colors and ethnic backgrounds. Much of that work has been lost. Some of it is findable. Oscar Micheaux was one of the people I found for my students. He was a hugely successful African-American writer/director and he also wrote novels and he translated his novels into films. One of them is called Within Our Gates and it’s free on YouTube as well and he looked at middle class African-Americans talking in the 1910’s and presented them to the audience in ways that other movies were not and I thin kit’s important for them to know his work in line with Cecil B. DeMille and D. W. Griffith and all those other guys because they’re not the only men – they’re not the only people who are around but if you look at film history classes that’s all they’ve learned and that really bothers me.

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Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 83 in a series – Greatest Teen Idol?

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Monkees quote 83

Why is Jones, and not Sherman or Jackson or Cassidy, considered the greatest Teen Idol? It could be the existence of that The Brady Bunch episode, which enshrined him to the television audience as the ultimate teen idol. While other programs starring teen idols fell out of rerun favor, The Brady Bunch continued, which meant Jones kept showing up as Marcia’s dream date over and over again. 

from Why The Monkees Matter by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

    

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From The Research Vault: The Monkees still have plenty to say. by Jeff Marcus, Goldmine:  The Music Collector’s Magazine.

 
The Monkees still have plenty to say. by Jeff Marcus, Goldmine:  The Music Collector’s Magazine.
 

There’s a great scene from the sitcom “Married … With Children” that illustrates the prejudice against The Monkees perfectly.

Bud and Kelly Bundy have won a performance by the speed-metal band Anthrax in a radio contest. Square-peg neighbor Marcy Rhoades digs a tunnel to check on the kids (they are trapped in a snow storm while Al and Peg are vacationing in Sweatbucket, Fla., with Edd “Kookie” Byrnes) and eyes a group of “killers.” In learning that they are musicians, Marcy bursts with nerdy glee, “I don’t want you to think I’m un-hip. I chased The Monkees like everyone else.”

Since debuting in 1966, The Monkees, a rock group made-to-order for TV, have been fighting the “un-hip” stigma.

Forty-five years later, it looks as if The Monkees now are winning that fight. My Facebook page lit up like a Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center when I posted that I would be interviewing the four members of the group. The posts generated more responses and “likes” than anything I’ve submitted to date. A recent plea in Goldmine to induct The Monkees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame was embraced with a unanimous YES!

Read the complete article – The Monkees still have plenty to say. by Jeff Marcus


 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

   

 

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Silent Films Are Important from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

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Silent Films Are Important from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Silent Films Are Important from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

 

A recording of my presentation at this year’s University Film and Video Association (UFVA) 2017 conference.

Transcript:

So, I think it’s really important to teach silent films because we’re teaching the screenwriters that the visual is important. Much as I love the words more, you do have to think about how they’re shown and, of course, these are visuals that show is the emotion of the moment and I think that they are really beautiful. So, it’s fun for the students — I totally agree with Warren — to have this heritage in their life, to understand that this all came before them. That’s very, very important.

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A History of Screenwriting 48 – The Engagement Ring – Mabel Normand – 1912

A History of Screenwriting 48 – The Engagement Ring – Mabel Normand – 1912

Alice has two persistent suitors, one rich, one poor. Each buys her an engagement ring; the rich man pays cash, but the poor man must pay on installments. He has trouble making the payments, but then he’s injured in an auto accident and the settlement allows him to pay off the ring and propose to Alice.


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From The Research Vault: Blacks and White TV: African Americans in Television Since 1948 by Fred J. MacDonald

 
 

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The second edition of this powerful analysis of African-Americans in the television insudtry since 1948 is completely updated. The increased visibility of blacks in television, the success of the Cosby Show and other sitcoms featuring black actors, and the impact of cable TV on programming are described in detail. Professor MacDonald traces the stereotyping, tokenism, and unfair treatment of blacks from the early days of the indsutry, but expresses his hope and belief that a new video order is materializing that will finally fulfill the bright promise of television. — Amazon

 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

   

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More On Women in Early Filmmaking from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

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Women in Early Filmmaking from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

More On Women in Early Filmmaking from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

 

A recording of my presentation at this year’s University Film and Video Association (UFVA) 2017 conference.

Transcript:

 In Beauchamp’s book, you’ll see all these famous women. My great joy is that one of my students, who teaches directing, found Lois Weber in my class who wrote and directed her films back in the day and now incorporates her into the set of directors that he teaches as examples because she had that kind of career back in the day. Eve Unsell ran her own production company for Universal for 10 years. Made a ton of movies that are very very successful in the day. She also allows us to go into the place where we discuss the problems with films whether it is back them or today because she was involved in what, back then, were yellow race films which were anti-Asian-American films and so that’s something students should understand about. So, again that goes back to to the title of what we are talking about and I talk fast because I’m Sicilian. I also don’t want to eat up all the time.

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Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 82 in a series – Davy Remembered

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Quotes from

A measure of Jones’ standing also comes from considering the massive amount of international news outlets, from Australia to Japan that covered his death in 2012. The evening news on all three American broadcast channels covered the story, with Diane Sawyer announcing that a “startling bulletin came across in the newsroom”.  She then proclaimed “He is still that forever young and sunny singer from The Monkees who made more than one generation want to sing along.”  

from Why The Monkees Matter by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

   

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A History of Screenwriting – 47 in a series – City Lights – Charlie Chaplin (1931)

A History of Screenwriting – 47 in a series – City Lights – Charlie Chaplin (1931)

A History of Screenwriting - 47 in a series - City Lights - Charlie Chaplin (1931)

City Lights film.jpg
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City Lights is a 1931 American pre-Code silent romantic comedy film written, produced, directed by and starring Charlie Chaplin. The story follows the misadventures of Chaplin’s Tramp as he falls in love with a blind girl (Virginia Cherrill) and develops a turbulent friendship with an alcoholic millionaire (Harry Myers).

Although sound films were on the rise when Chaplin started developing the script in 1928, he decided to continue working with silent productions. Filming started in December 1928 and ended in September 1930. City Lights marked the first time Chaplin composed the film score to one of his productions and it was written in six weeks with Arthur Johnston. The main theme, used as a leitmotif for the blind flower girl, is the song “La Violetera” (“Who’ll Buy my Violets”) from Spanish composer José Padilla. Chaplin lost a lawsuit to Padilla for not crediting him.

City Lights was immediately successful upon release on January 30, 1931 with positive reviews and box office receipts of $5 million. Today, many critics consider it not only the highest accomplishment of Chaplin’s career, but one of the greatest films of all time. In 1991, the Library of Congress selected City Lights for preservation in the United States National Film Registry as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”. In 2007, the American Film Institute ranked it 11th on its list of the best American films ever made. In 1949, the critic James Agee called the film’s final scene “the greatest single piece of acting ever committed to celluloid”.[2] — Wikipedia


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