Women’s History Month – 7 in a series – Ellen Craft

Women's History Month - 7 in a series - Ellen Craft

Ellen Craft was a fugitive slave made famous by the daring escape she and her husband William Craft (1824–1900) made in December 1848. Ellen, disguised as an infirm and sickly slaveholding gentleman, and her husband William, posing as a slave servant, traveled from the slaveholding state of Georgia to freedom in Philadelphia. So widely publicized was their escape that the Crafts became world- renowned spokespersons for abolitionism.

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Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

A History of Screenwriting – 11 in a series – Caicedo (with Pole) (1894)

I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch


Caicedo (with Pole) (1894)

Caicedo (with Pole)

According to Edison film historian C. Musser, Venezuelan rope and slack wire walker Juan Caicedo performed in the U.S. during 1894 and again at the end of the century. From May 14 to Sept. 8, 1894, he appeared at Koster & Bial’s Music Hall in New York City. 

From Raff & Gammon price list: The “King of the Wire” in his marvelous slack wire performance. $10.00.

OTHER TITLES
Title in Raff & Gammon price list: Caicedo 

Caicedo. No. 1 

CREATED/PUBLISHED
United States : Edison Manufacturing Co., [1894]

NOTES
Copyright: no reg. 

Performer: Juan A. Caicedo. 

Camera, William Heise. 

Filmed July 25, 1894, at the Edison Laboratory in West Orange, N.J. 

Received: 5-13-1994; viewing print; preservation; Hendricks (Gordon) Collection. 

SUBJECTS
Aerialists–United States.
Vaudeville–United States.
Wire rope–United States.
Venezuelans–United States.
Variety

RELATED NAMES
Dickson, W. K.-L. (William Kennedy-Laurie), 1860-1935, production.
Heise, William, camera.
Caicedo, Juan A., performer.
Thomas A. Edison, Inc. 
Hendricks (Gordon) Collection (Library of Congress) 

DIGITAL ID
edmp.4021 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mbrsmi/edmp.4021

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Women’s History Month – 6 in a series – Martha Ballard

Women's History Month - 6 in a series - Martha Ballard

Martha Moore Ballard played a pivotal role in her community as a midwife and healer. Through her diary she has become a historically important female voice documenting social, economic, and religious change in rural postcolonial America. Few women could write in the 18th century, and fewer still participated in public life, resulting in poor documentation of women’s daily lives. Because women could not own property and seldom participated in legal matters, few details regarding individual women’s lives appear in historical documents. 

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 5 in a series – Bridget Bishop

Women's History Month - 5 in a series - Bridget Bishop

The religious passion and antiwoman sentiment of 17th-century colonial North America reached its apogee in Salem, Massachusetts, during the infamous Salem Witch Trials. One victim of the trials, Bridget Playfer Waselby Oliver Bishop, was accused three times of being a witch and was hanged in 1692, the first victim of the Salem hysteria. The vast majority of people executed for witchcraft were women. Eighteen others followed Bishop to the hangman’s noose before the governor put a stop to it a few months later.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Introduction from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing, Book Soup. Hollywood [Video] (1:03)

This book signing at Book Soup was wonderful – good people, good conversation (before and after the signing). Just another example of the kind of quality positive people who have been drawn to The Monkees across generations – I even met a former head of publicity for ScreenGems who had some fun stories to tell. — Rosanne

Introduction from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing, Book Soup. Hollywood [Video] (1:03)

 

 

Transcript:

Thank you. Thank you. Thank everybody for coming out tonight. It’s really coo to talk about The Monkees whenever you get a chance so I appreciate the chance. What I was just going to do was I was going to read a little bit from the Preface and the Introduction — kind of a setup for the purpose of the book and what it’s all about and then just talk about The Monkees for a little bit and see if anybody’s interested in telling stories and what they first remember about the show. So, if that’s good with everybody….I’ll start. The Preface of the book is called “I’m (Still) A Believer” and one of the things I did in writing it was I made all the chapters were the titles of songs — famous Monkee songs and it was really interesting to sit there and try to think of, what was the right song to put on this particular (chapter) and I ended up finding song titles I didn’t even remember because they put out so much music and everyone has their favorites and you just didn’t realize that there were these other titles. So, part of the them, they might have been perfect for that chapter, but they didn’t hit your brain immediately as obvious Monkee songs so then I would pick something else. The first one is obviously “I’m (Still) A Believer” because that’s what brought me to writing about them.

Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today!

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition


About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

Women’s History Month – 4 in a series – Malinche

Women's History Month - 4 in a series - Malinche

Malinche does not fit easily into Mexican, Spanish, or American history. She, like innumerable other Mexican women who came after her, was a translator who made possible the communication between Spaniards and Mexican Amerindians. Few of these women have been as prominent as Malinche, chiefly because she was Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés’s (1485–1547) mouthpiece but also because she was the first of her kind. Also, not unlike Pocahontas, Malinche’s story has been used as myth, though in Malinche’s case her story has devolved into a cautionary tale of the dangers of Euro-American and Native American contact.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 3 in a series – Phillis Wheatley

Women's History Month - 3 in a series - Phillis Wheatley

Poet Phillis Wheatley was born in West Africa, sold into slavery, and eventually freed. She wrote poems at a time when many people argued that people of African descent were so inferior to Euro-Americans as to be fit only for slavery. She is remembered as a preeminent poet of the American Revolutionary period. Unlike most slaves, Wheatley had an opportunity to demonstrate an intellectual talent that her masters were willing to develop. As a result, she received a rather extensive education for the time— something rather rare for any woman, let alone a slave.

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

Women’s History Month – 2 in a series – Anne Marbury Hutchinson

Women's History Month - 2 in a series - Anne Marbury Hutchinson

Puritan nonconformist Anne Hutchinson was a wife, mother, and midwife who lived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and gained fame by challenging the colony’s leadership with her own interpretation of Puritan theology. She also threatened the social hierarchy by demonstrating her willingness and ability to operate outside traditional female cultural boundaries. Hutchinson’s actions not only gained her notoriety in her own lifetime but also helped to transform the “Puritan Way” in the American colonies. – Volume 1

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian

More on Adapting The Hobbit from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (0:44)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

More on Adapting The Hobbit from A History of the Art of Adaptation

 

Transcript:

Lots of true Tolkien fans – deeply angry that such a thing should happen and there should be focus on a character when other stuff was being thrown out. This is a choice for screenwriters and directors as they try to decide to bring something to film. The Hobbit had been made in animation several years earlier — 1977 — and it’s only 77 minutes long. So, would you rather have that version or the new version with an extra elf that doesn’t really exist. Now make up your mind. What I love about this is that made by Rankin-Bass the same company that gave us Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. Who himself was an adaptation of a song. A song turned into a beloved Christmas story. So, you can adapt from anything.

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

Women’s History Month – 1 in a series – Pocahontas

Womens history 01

Disney has honored Pocahontas in film, and she is a staple of the public school curriculum and is a symbol of a good Native American. We think we know her, but the events of her life have grown beyond the bounds of history. She has become a myth, one useful in telling a particular version of the American past. Even historians cannot always be sure what is true and what is not when it comes to Pocahontas. In many ways, she is the American version of Eve, the progenitor of a new race of humans and a new destiny for her people and for Euro-Americans. – Volume 1

Read more in…

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection Volume One: Precolonial North America To The Early Republic – Dr. Peg A. Lamphier And Dr. Rosanne Welch, Editors

Recommend this set to your local and university librarian