From The Research Vault: Charles M. Schulz: Conversations (Conversations with Comic Artists Series) by M. Thomas Inge

From The Research Vault: Charles M. Schulz: Conversations (Conversations with Comic Artists Series) by M. Thomas Inge

 

Through his comic strip Peanuts, Charles M. Schulz (1922-2000) has left his signatures on American culture–Lucy’s fake hold for the kickoff, Linus’s security blanket, Charlie Brown’s baseball team that never wins a game, and his everyman cry of “Good Grief!”

When Schulz died February 13, 2000, the eve of publication for the last Sunday strip he would draw, the world mourned the passing of a gentle humorist and minimalist innovator, a comic strip artist who had become one of America’s major pop philosophers, theologians, and psychologists in the last half of the twentieth century.

Charles M. Schulz: Conversations reveals that man, open and warm once a conversation began. During his career, his little kid characters and Snoopy and Woodstock appeared for 355 million readers in 2,600 papers in 75 countries, in 30 television specials and four feature films, and in an off-Broadway musical. Selected from over 300 interviews published between 1957 and the present, this collection serves as a celebration of the popular strip’s 50th anniversary on October 2, 2000, and as a lasting tribute to the man friends called “Sparky.”

Schulz talks at length about life, theology, sports, the art of the comic strip, and the human condition in general. He ruminates as well on the origins and the importance of Charlie Brown, Lucy, Snoopy, and friends as icons of the American imagination. America’s most universally admired and respected comic artist talks about how his own life and insecurities have inspired some of his finest moments in comic strip history.

Until Schulz’s retirement, he never missed a deadline and was totally responsible for writing, drawing, and lettering the feature every day, a record matched by no other cartoonist in newspaper history.

Including dozens of classic Peanuts strips, this volume suggests that if we had only one artifact for deposit in a time capsule, something to tell future historians what life in the late twentieth century was all about, we could do no better than to enclose a complete run of Peanuts. — Amazon

 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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A History of Screenwriting – 38 in a series – Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm – Frances Marion

A History of Screenwriting – 38 in a series – Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm – Frances Marion

A History of Screenwriting - 38 in a series - Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm - Frances Marion

Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm is a 1917 American silent comedy-drama film directed by Marshall Neilan based upon the novel of the same name by Kate Douglas Wiggin. This version is notable for having been adapted by famed female screenwriter Frances Marion. The film was made by the “Mary Pickford Company” and was an acclaimed box office hit. When the play premiered on Broadway in the 1910 theater season the part of Rebecca was played by Edith Taliaferro.[1][2][3]

As described in a film magazine,[4] Rebecca Randall (Pickford) is taken into the home of her aunt Hannah (Eddy), a strict New England woman. Rebecca meets Adam Ladd (O’Brien), a young man of the village, and they become great friends. One day Rebecca promises to marry Adam when she becomes of age. Unable to withstand her pranks any longer, her aunt sends her away to a boarding school. She graduates a beautiful young lady. Shortly thereafter, Adam demands a fulfillment of her promise. — Wikipedia



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I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 73 in a series – Chaotic Narrative Structure

 

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 Quotes from

The Monkees might never have planned to have no format but by doing so their chaotic narrative structure mirrored the freewheeling style shared by all the other creative artists contributing to the program. It kept the audience on their toes and kept them feeling fresh. It seems the actors did not recognize the narrative variety the program offered as well as their audience did.

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

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The Latest Journal of Screenwriting is HERE!

Journal screenwriting v8i2 cover

Journal screenwriting v8i2 mastheadJournal screenwriting v8i2 toc

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It was quite satisfying to receive my copy of The Journal of Screenwriting yesterday (Issue 8.2) with my first efforts as the Book Reviews Editor.

The issue also contains the conference report I co-wrote on the 9th Annual Conference, held in Leeds last year. I really enjoyed participating in the writing of that report because it gave me a chance to mention the many wonderful paper presentations that I saw. It also happens to include a wonderful article by my friend Rose Ferrell from Australia (who just completed her Phd thesis which you can access here) about the concept of National voice and how much of our national voice filters into our writers voice

Of course my mind is already rolling with ideas about how to write about this most recent conference at a Otago University. Right now I will enjoy this copy of the Journal looking at the book reviews and the articles with a new kind of focus. The new goal is to find reasons to bring students to read these types of academic journals and discuss them in class — and to find more college libraries that will subscribe so they can have the Journal on hand for their screenwriting students!

If you work for a university – give The Journal of Screenwriting a read!

From The Research Vault: The Rise and Fall of the American Teenager by Thomas Hine

From The Research Vault: The Rise and Fall of the American Teenager by Thomas Hine

 

In the groundbreaking work, Thomas Hine examines the American teenager as a social invention shaped by the needs of the twentieth century. With intelligence, insight, imagination, and humorm he traces the culture of youth in America-from the spiritual trials of young Puritans and the vision quests of Native Americans to the media-blitzed consumerism of contempory thirteen-to-nineteen -year-olds. The resulting study is a glorious appreciation of youth that challenges us to confront our sterotypesm, rethink our expectations, and consider anew the lives of those individuals who are blessing, our bane, and our future. — Amazon

 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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A History of Screenwriting – 37 in a series – Writers in Hollywood 1915-1951, Ian Hamilton

A History of Screenwriting – 37 in a series – Writers in Hollywood 1915-1951, Ian Hamilton

The story of Hollywood has often been told from the point of view of the stars, the directors, the tycoons, but not until now from the point of view of the gallery of writers who helped shape it, including Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Chandler, and many others. – Amazon

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs *

* Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 


I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch Moderates “Freaks, Geeks, And Queen Bees: Crafting The Teenage Voice For TV” – WGAw Los Angeles – Oct 23 at 730pm

On Mon, October 23, 2017 (7:30 PM – 9:00 PM) I’ll be moderating another panel for the WGA Foundation. This one is near and dear to my heart as it’s on writing with the teenage voice: Freaks, Geeks, And Queen Bees: Crafting The Teenage Voice For TV.

Chuck Rosin of Beverly Hills, 90210 has agreed to join the panel and invites are out to folks on other iconic teen shows – I’ll update you as I know. General Admission is $25 / WGA or SAG members and Student tickets are $20.

Get tickets here

FREAKS, GEEKS, AND QUEEN BEES: CRAFTING THE TEENAGE VOICE FOR TV

Mon, October 23, 2017
7:30 PM – 9:00 PM

Beverly Hills 90210 Season 2 250x250

From BEVERLY HILLS, 90210 and DAWSON’S CREEK to GOSSIP GIRL and RIVERDALE, television shows set in the world of teenagers have evolved through the years but still tackle the myriad issues young people face in this period of awkwardness and angst. 

On this special evening, our panel discusses the craft behind writing with the teenage voice in mind, how they develop characters and refresh tried-and-true plots, and how writers are reinventing and reimagining the genre. 

Panelists

Charles Rosin (SOUTH OF NOWHERE, DAWSON’S CREEK, BEVERLY HILLS, 90210)
Stay tuned for more panelist announcements!

Moderated by Dr. Rosanne Welch (TOUCHED BY AN ANGEL, BEVERLY HILLS, 90210)

Doors open at 7:00pm. Event starts at 7:30pm.

All events advertised on our “Events” page are open to anyone who wants to buy a ticket – not just WGA members!

In the case the event is sold out, we will have a first come, first serve stand-by line at the event. The stand-by line does not guarantee entry into the event.

Proceeds benefit the Foundation’s library and archive and other outreach programs.

Get tickets here

Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (17:44)

Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

 

A recording of my presentation at this year’s University Film and Video Association (UFVA) 2017 conference.

I was pleased to be asked to participate in a panel designed by former student (and current kick-ass professor) Warren Lewis. The panel included two other former students from the MFA in Screenwriting program at CSUF: David Morgassen and Lucas Cuny. For the panel’s theme — “What Else Do We Teach When We Teach Screenwriting: Context And Controversy: Strategies For Teaching Film And Television History And Current Events To Screenwriters” — I chose to present on: “Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them”.

It involves the fact that when teaching screenwriting history, I begin chronologically. In essence I force students to watch the classic films of the silent era (happily accessible for free on YouTube) first because that is when women ran the town as evidenced in Cari Beachamp’s Without Lying Down: Frances Marion and the Powerful Women of Early Hollywood”.) Beauchamp’s book is on my reading list so that they can encounter the careers of Frances Marion, Anita Loos, Lois Weber, Adela Rogers St. Johns, Eve Unsell and a host of other women who ran their own production companies for many years.

Secondly, knowing women once ran Hollywood makes it harder for today’s executives to wonder if today’s women can do the same.
Third, I have learned that teaching silent films reminds modern students that in screenwriting the visual is as important as the verbal.

Fourth, recognizing the birth of major iconic archetypes helps them recognize those archetypes in modern films and develop their own characters more three-dimensionally.
Fifth, I had to embarrassingly realize that in my zest to focus on forgotten females, I forgot to cover the careers of forgotten men and women of color and so expanded my viewing list to include the work of Oscar Mischeaux and other artists of color from the era.

Finally, I stretch back to the silents as a reminder that all artists stand of the shoulders of those who came before them – be they women or men.

Books Mentioned In This Presentation

Follow Dr. Rosanne Welch

Twitter: https://twitter.com/rosannewelch
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drrosannewelch/

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Rosanne Welch, PhD has written for television (Touched by an Angel, Picket Fences) and print (Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space). In the documentary world she has written and produced Bill Clinton and the Boys Nation Class of 1963 for ABC NEWS/Nightline and consulted on PBS’s A Prince Among Slaves, the story of a prince from West Africa who was enslaved in the 1780s, freed by order of President John Quincy Adams in the 1820s and returned to his homeland.

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 72 in a series – MTV and The Monkees

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

It has often been said that The Monkees gave birth to MTV, which may or may not ever be provable. Certainly, the fact that each episode involved at least two musical montages showed that audiences enjoyed watching their favorite songs visualized and two episodes could be considered long videos ala Michael Jackson’s Thriller, though those were more in the style of documentary.

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

From The Research Vault: Davy We Hardly Knew Ye: Why The Monkees Matter by Janice Harper

From The Research Vault: Davy We Hardly Knew Ye: Why The Monkees Matter by Janice Harper

From The Research Vault: Davy We Hardly Knew Ye: Why The Monkees Matter by Janice Harper

Davy We Hardly Knew Ye: Why The Monkees Matter By Janice Harper

One time when I was a little girl, I decided to run away. I stormed out of the house and began marching across the football field behind our home, hell-bent on never seeing my parents again, probably for no better reason than they’d told me to clean up my room. I had no idea where I’d go or how I’d survive, but I knew one thing for sure: I was never going back home, no matter what. And I marched on.

But as I reached the end of the field, I looked down at my watch to see how long it had taken me to make the long trek, only to discover to my horror that it was almost time for The Monkees. I had completely forgotten it was Monkees night, and I had about ten minutes to turn around and run all the way back if I wasn’t going to miss the opening theme song. I still remember standing there, torn between my desire for liberation and my desire for half an hour with Davy Jones. Runaway or not, I wasn’t about to run away from Davy, nor miss an episode of The Monkees.

Read the entire article

 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

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