Women in Early Filmmaking from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

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Women in Early Filmmaking from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Women in Early Filmmaking from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

 

A recording of my presentation at this year’s University Film and Video Association (UFVA) 2017 conference.

Transcript:

So I teach history and I start in the silent film world, so I disagree with Warren. I go chronologically. This is a period they have never heard of and all the movies are free on YouTube. Nothing like telling them they can watch whatever they have to watch for free. That works, right? And so here they meet Anita Loos, Gene Gauntier — the first women — the first person to do filming on location. She went to Jerusalem to film the story of Jesus Christ — the first time it was put on film and it’s a really beautiful film you can see, for free, on YouTube. Then Jeanie MacPherson who wrote all of Cecil B. DeMille’s early movies that were successes. When she stopped working for him all his stuff failed. Nobody knows her name and she’s quite brilliant. So I thinks it’s important for women students today to know that women once ran Hollywood so all this discussion about “I don’t know if women should direct a movie” is not worth having, because they did and they were. They were the highest paid people in this town, so I think that’s important an important think for them to remember. 

Books Mentioned In This Presentation

Follow Dr. Rosanne Welch

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First Look at our next book – Technical Innovation in American History: An Encyclopedia of Science and Technology

A3788C Wayne v1 REV

A3788C Wayne v2 REV

A3788C Wayne v3 REV

My co-editor Peg Lamphier and I were happy to see the newly designed covers for our next 3 Volume encyclopedia – Technical Innovation in American History. Thanks to all the wonderful contributors who came over from our encylcopedia on Women in American History

Look for it in 2019!

From ABC-CLIO…

Technical Innovation in American History: An Encyclopedia of Science and Technology surveys the history of technology, documenting the chronological and thematic connections between specific inventions, technological systems, individuals, and events that have contributed to the history of science and technology in the United States. Covering eras from colonial times to the present day in three chronological volumes, the entries include innovations in fields such as architecture, civil engineering, transportation, energy, mining and oil industries, chemical industries, electronics, computer and information technology, communications (television, radio, and print), agriculture and food technology, and military technology.

The A–Z entries address key individuals, events, organizations, and legislation related to themes such as industry, consumer and medical technology, military technology, computer technology, and space science, among others, enabling readers to understand how specific inventions, technological systems, individuals, and events influenced the history, cultural development, and even self-identity of the United States and its people. The information also spotlights how American culture, the U.S. government, and American society have specifically influenced technological development.

 

Without Lying Down by Cari Beauchamp | Gifts for the Screenwriter #1

Without Lying Down by Cari Beauchamp | Gifts for the Screenwriter #1

Without Lying Down by Cari Beauchamp | Gifts for Screenwriters #1

One of the best biographies of a writer – and a female writer at that – Without Lying Down tells the story of Frances Marion, the highest paid screenwriter and a double Oscar winner whose career spanned the Silent Era and transformed into Talkies quite well (judging by the Oscars). Since she surrounded herself with a cadre of other female screenwriters at the time, the book is a marvelous introduction to a time when women ran Hollywood. — Rosanne

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Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 81 in a series – Davy the Teen idol

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

Forced into the teen idol role by Hollywood Jones was the one teen idol that resonated across the years. Jones pondered what it meant to have posters of his face plastered across so many teenagers walls when he co-wrote the song “Ceiling in my Room” (with Dominick DeMieri and Robert Dick) for the group’s fifth album The Birds, The Bees and The Monkees.  

from Why The Monkees Matter by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

   

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

A History of Screenwriting – 46 in a series – The Gold Rush – Charlie Chaplin (1925)

A History of Screenwriting – 46 in a series – The Gold Rush – Charlie Chaplin (1925)

Gold rush chaplin

Gold rush poster.jpg
By UnknownHere, Public Domain, Link

The Gold Rush is a 1925 American comedy film written, produced, and directed by Charlie Chaplin. The film also stars Chaplin in his Little Tramp persona, Georgia Hale, Mack Swain, Tom Murray, Henry Bergman, and Malcolm Waite.

The Gold Rush received Academy Award nominations for Best Music and Best Sound Recording upon its re-release in 1942. It is today one of Chaplin’s most celebrated works, and he himself declared several times that it was the film for which he most wanted to be remembered.[3]

The idea for this film came from Chaplin looking at the pictures of the Gold Rush in Klondike in 1896. At the same time, he accidentally read a book about immigrants who trapped the snow in Sierra Nevada, had to eat their own boots or the corpses of their friends. Chaplin, who believed tragedies and comics were not far from each other, decided to combine these stories of deprivation and horror in comedy. He decided that his famous rogue figure should become a gold-digger who joins a brave optimist determined to face all the pitfalls associated with the search for gold, such as sickness, hunger, loneliness, or the possibility that he may at any time be attacked by a grizzly. In the movie, we see scenes like Chaplin cooking and dreaming of his shoe, or how his starving friend Big Jim sees him as a chicken. — Wikipedia


Learn More About Charlie Chaplin with these books

 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available at the LA Public Library

From The Research Vault: The Politics of Ecstasy by Timothy Leary

 

Writings that sparkle with the psychedelic revolution. The Politics of Ecstasy is Timothy Leary’s most provocative and influential exploration of human consciousness, written during the period from his Harvard days to the Summer of Love. Includes his early pronouncements on the psychedelic movement and his views on social and political ramifications of psychedelic and mystical experience.
Here is the outspoken Playboy interview revealing the sexual power of LSD-a statement that many believe played a key role in provoking Leary’s incarceration by the authorities; an early outline of the neurological theory that became Leary’s classic eight-circuit model of the human nervous system; an insightful exploration of the life and work of novelist Hermann Hesse; an effervescent dialogue with humorist Paul Krassner; and an impassioned defense of what Leary called “The Fifth Freedom”-the right to get high. — Amazon

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

Order Your Copy Now!

Let’s Kill Off The Auteur Theory from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

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Let’s Kill Off The Auteur Theory from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Let's Kill Off The Auteur Theory  from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch

 

A recording of my presentation at this year’s University Film and Video Association (UFVA) 2017 conference.

Transcript:

You got to the next question which is my first exercise in class — Name the writer. Lucky if they can. If it’s a writer/director, they can. Otherwise, they can’t and they suddenly are embarrassed because they adore the words of a person whose name they can’t tell you. If they have a favorite book they can tell you who wrote it, but they don’t know who wrote their favorite film. So it’s my goal to make them know that. I can’t stand the Auteur Theory because I think it’s bullshit. Directors aren’t the authors of their film. I don’t want to insult any directors in the class but you can’t direct something that doesn’t exist on the page first. It’s a collaborative thing and directors have lovely, but they’ve been given all the credit for far too long because, as we know, it goes back to all the book reviews in Cahiers and they came up with that theory. It’s nonsense.

Books Mentioned In This Presentation

Follow Dr. Rosanne Welch

Twitter: https://twitter.com/rosannewelch
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drrosannewelch/

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 80 in a series – Micky The Monkee

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

 In terms of creating the fictional identity of “Micky the Monkee”, Dolenz felt the writers created the character more so than he did: “They were looking for that guy who just jumped off the screen at them. And to say how much of it was me — I don’t know if I can quantify it. They developed that character of the wacky drummer. They gave me the funny voice. I don’t do funny voices all the time and I don’t run backward at a high rate of speed. But it was partly my personality.”  

from Why The Monkees Matter by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

   

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

A History of Screenwriting – 45 in a series – The Kid – Charlie Chaplin (1921)

A History of Screenwriting – 45 in a series – The Kid – Charlie Chaplin (1921)

A History of Screenwriting - 45 in a series - The Kid - Charlie Chaplin (1921)

The Kid is a 1921 American silent comedy-drama film written by, produced by, directed by, and starring Charlie Chaplin, and features Jackie Coogan[4] as his adopted son and sidekick. This was Chaplin’s first full-length film as a director (he had been a co-star in 1914’s Tillie’s Punctured Romance). It was a huge success, and was the second-highest-grossing film in 1921, behind The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. In 2011, The Kid was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.” Innovative in its combination of comedic and dramatic elements,[5] The Kid is widely considered one of the greatest films of the silent era.[6] — Wikipedia


Learn More About Charlie Chaplin with these books

 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available at the LA Public Library

From The Research Vault: La Merica: Images Of Italian Greenhorn Experience by Michael La Sorte

 

 Uses diaries, letters, selections from autobiographies, and statistical documents to describe the experiences of Italian immigrants in the United States prior to World War I, and explains how they adapted to their new lives — Amazon

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

Order Your Copy Now!