11 Women Writers You Don’t Know from “When Women Wrote Hollywood” with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (35 seconds)

Part of the California State University, Fullerton Faculty Noon Time Talks at the Pollak Library.

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11 Women Writers You Don't Know from

 

Transcript:

These are some ladies you probably don’t know. Does anybody recognize any of them? She’s the most likely one for anyone to know because she’s also an actress. If you saw Harold and Maude, Rosemary’s Baby? That’s Ruth Gordon. Ruth Gordon was a four-time oscar-nominated screenwriter as well as winning the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for Rosemary’s Baby. So we’re gonna talk about these ladies and who they are.

Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses the women in her new book “When Women Wrote Hollywood” which covers female screenwriters from the Silents through the early 1940s when women wrote over 50% of films and Frances Marion was the highest paid screenwriter (male or female) and the first to win 2 Oscars.  Yet, she fails to appear in film history books, which continue to regurgitate the myth that male directors did it all – even though it’s been proven that the only profitable movies Cecil B. de Mille ever directed were all written by Jeannie Macpherson film ever won for Best Picture was written by Robert E. Sherwood (who people have heard of, mostly due to his connection to Dorothy Parker) and Joan Harrison.


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† Available from the LA Public Library

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood – 34 in a series – The Best Revenge Is Outliving Them All

Do you know about these women screenwriters? Many don’t. Learn more about them today! 

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood - 34 in a series - The Best Revenge Is Outliving Them All

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Frederica Sagor Maas was a screenwriter whose career spanned decades and was full of imagination, hard work and disillusionment. Taking a decade to write her memoir, which she finally published at the ripe age of 99, Maas expressed her feelings for the Hollywood industry and how her husband Ernest and she saw their ideas stolen and turned to trash before eventually being accused of communism and being blacklisted.

The Best Revenge Is Outliving Them All: The life and heartbreak of Frederica Sagor Maas 
by Mikayla Daniels


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood or Buy the Book on Amazon

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

More On The Monkees: Monkeemania in Australia

Look what my friend Derham Groves sent me! Booklets from his exhibition on the Monkees in Australia!

Now I can feel as if I’ve actually been there – and we all still have time since the exhibit runs through the end of the year! What better reason to visit Australia?

More On The Monkees: Monkeesmania in Australia

Want to learn more about The Monkees? Buy Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

 

A hit television show about a fictitious rock band, The Monkees (1966-1968) earned two Emmys–Outstanding Comedy Series and Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy.

Capitalizing on the show’s success, the actual band formed by the actors, at their peak, sold more albums than The Beatles and The Rolling Stones combined, and set the stage for other musical TV characters from The Partridge Family to Hannah Montana. In the late 1980s, the Monkees began a series of reunion tours that continued into their 50th anniversary.

This book tells the story of The Monkees and how the show changed television, introducing a new generation to the fourth-wall-breaking slapstick created by Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers.

Its creators contributed to the innovative film and television of 1970s with projects like Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Laugh-In and Welcome Back, Kotter. Immense profits from the show, its music and its merchandising funded the producers’ move into films such as Head, Easy Riderand Five Easy Pieces.

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

Want to use “Why The Monkees Matter” in your classroom?

Order Examination Copies, Library and Campus Bookstore orders directly from McFarland

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8 Assumptions That A Man Did The Work from The Sisterhood of Science Fiction – Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (31 seconds)

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The Sisterhood of Science Fiction: A Walk Through Some Writers and Characters You (Should) Know And Love

8 Assumptions That A Man Did The Work from The Sisterhood of Science Fiction - Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (31 seconds)

 

This one allowed me to riff on some of my favorite female science fiction writers across time, whether they be novelists or television writers. It also opened up a good conversation on what art we support and include in our lives – and what that art says to us and about us. — Rosanne

Transcript:

So like side tangent story I remember reading that when Barbara Streisand was directing her first movie she asked Steven Spielberg a couple of questions and immediately what the Press reported was Spielberg Co-assists Streisand directing. Of all the dudes who direct Spielberg called up George Lucas and said, “I’m doing this Indiana Jones thing what do you think?” Nobody said George Lucas co-directs Indiana Jones right? No the boys can ask questions. The girls. No no, that means they need help right? So we have a lot of that sort of old-fashioned controversy which hangs around for a while.



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 

Rosanne co-hosts Zilch Podcast #139 with Monkees 101 on the episode “The Spy Who Came in from the Cool”

I’m happy to note that another episode of Monkees 101 that I co-host with Dr. Sarah Clark is up on the Zilch: A Monkees Podcast site. 

This time we discuss a supremely silly episode, iconic for making jokes about Davy’s height and his love of ‘red maracas’. 

It guest stars some fun character actors of the era, including Arlene Martel, who is more famous in fan circles as T’Pring, Spock’s Vulcan bride in the episode, Star Trek: Amok Time, which she filmed the next year. 

Rosanne co-hosts Zilch #139 Monkees 101 on the episode

MONKEES 101 looks at the episode “The Spy Who Came in from the Cool” and the times around it, Micky and his band play a couple of tunes and a good time is had by all. Order the New Davy Jones cd from “7A”!

Listen to this episode


Want to learn more about The Monkees? Buy Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

 

A hit television show about a fictitious rock band, The Monkees (1966-1968) earned two Emmys–Outstanding Comedy Series and Outstanding Directorial Acheivement in Comedy.

Capitalizing on the show’s success, the actual band formed by the actors, at their peak, sold more albums than The Beatles and The Rolling Stones combined, and set the stage for other musical TV characters from The Partridge Family to Hannah Montana. In the late 1980s, the Monkees began a series of reunion tours that continued into their 50th anniversary.

This book tells the story of The Monkees and how the show changed television, introducing a new generation to the fourth-wall-breaking slapstick created by Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers.

Its creators contributed to the innovative film and television of 1970s with projects like Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Laugh-In and Welcome Back, Kotter. Immense profits from the show, its music and its merchandising funded the producers’ move into films such as Head, Easy Riderand Five Easy Pieces.

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

Want to use “Why The Monkees Matter” in your classroom?

Order Examination Copies, Library and Campus Bookstore orders directly from McFarland

McFarland Company logo

10 Shonda Rhimes & Tina Fey from “When Women Wrote Hollywood” with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (44 seconds)

Part of the California State University, Fullerton Faculty Noon Time Talks at the Pollak Library.

Watch this entire presentation

10 Shonda Rhimes & Tina Fey from

 

Transcript:

…and we recognize Shonda Rhimes. We can’t not recognize Shonda Rhimes. She owns television thank to this show getting her started but, of course, Scandal, How To Get Way With Murder, all of these things have made Shonda Rhimes Shondaland, She’s got her whole production company as her “land” and the way she runs things. We recognize her? (Audience: Tina Fey) Tina Fey. Exactly. We sometimes forget she’s a writer. There’s a reason that this show existed. 30 Rock is basically a fictionalized version of working on Saturday Night Live. For which she got several Emmys and then, of course, she did Mean Girls, the movie and the Broadway show which was nominated for several Tonys last year or 2 years ago. So, you know, Tina’s doing pretty well.

Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses the women in her new book “When Women Wrote Hollywood” which covers female screenwriters from the Silents through the early 1940s when women wrote over 50% of films and Frances Marion was the highest paid screenwriter (male or female) and the first to win 2 Oscars.  Yet, she fails to appear in film history books, which continue to regurgitate the myth that male directors did it all – even though it’s been proven that the only profitable movies Cecil B. de Mille ever directed were all written by Jeannie Macpherson film ever won for Best Picture was written by Robert E. Sherwood (who people have heard of, mostly due to his connection to Dorothy Parker) and Joan Harrison.


Buy a signed copy of when Women Wrote Hollywood

…or via Amazon…

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Help! I’m being held hostage by Harpo Marx! 

I took his autobiography off my bookshelf the other night for a little time-filling reading before bed and I can’t put it down (even though I’ve already read it a few times).

It’s one of the best memoirs of people I’ll never get to meet (from Alexander Woollcott to Dorothy Parker to Ruth Gordon) and places I’ll never be (New York 1920) that I’ve ever read.

It’s one of my 3 favorite performer memoirs – with Moss Hart’s “Act One” and Anita Loos’ “A Girl Like I“.

Such fun, fun summer reading!

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood – 34 in a series – Bess Meredyth and The Academy

Do you know about these women screenwriters? Many don’t. Learn more about them today! 

Quotes from When Women Wrote Hollywood - 34 in a series - Bess Meredyth and The Academy

Get “When Women Wrote Hollywood” Today!

Bess Meredyth continued to cultivate an enormously successful screenwriting career. Meredyth was one of the thirty-six artists—including fellow screenwriter Jeanie Macpherson—who founded the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1928 (Sturtevant). Her name can be found in more than a dozen Academy bulletins as a member of the Awards of Merit committee, which was one of the first committees established.

You’d Better Learn to Hold Your Liquor:  Bess Meredyth and A Career in Early Hollywood
by Sydney Haven


Buy a signed copy of when Women Write Hollywood or Buy the Book on Amazon

Paperback Edition | Kindle Edition | Google Play Edition

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

07 More On Frankenstein from The Sisterhood of Science Fiction – Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (1 minute 16 seconds)

Watch this entire presentation

The Sisterhood of Science Fiction: A Walk Through Some Writers and Characters You (Should) Know And Love

07 More On Frankenstein from The Sisterhood of Science Fiction - Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (1 minute 16 seconds)

 

This one allowed me to riff on some of my favorite female science fiction writers across time, whether they be novelists or television writers. It also opened up a good conversation on what art we support and include in our lives – and what that art says to us and about us. — Rosanne

Transcript:

It then became such a huge hit that was kind of like “Oh” and then she’s rich so it’s not gonna hurt her day her reputation too much. Then she was kind of like “You know I want some credit for that. Everyone’s talking about this really wonderful book. I should let people know I did it. So the next version that came out in 1823 they put her name on it and of course from then on we’ve done that. Of course, just like with all things women achieve, I hate to tell you this but there’s always the discussion of “really did she write that I did Percy Shelley do most of the work and he drew his girlfriend’s name on it just as a present to her” and that’s been debated for years how much of it did he actually write. Luckily, in the British Library, they have her original papers. They have her original handwriting and his copy editing. So the different handwriting and you can see that in the next version which of those notes he took she took and which of those notes she ignored cuz honey it’s my book, not yours, right? So we have proof that is largely by and large hers. In any book that’s written, a writer sends it out to many friends, takes many notes, makes changes as they choose. We just always like to pick on when the girls make changes it must be something that the boys contributed much to, right? So I think that’s fascinating.



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 

Great Summer Read – The Library Book by Susan Orlean

Great Summer Read - The Library Book by Susan Orlean

I’m not often a joiner but when I saw the Los Angeles Times had started a book club I checked out their first book choice and it was one I intended to read anyway – so I joined. 

The book is Susan Orlean’s “The Library Book” which is a micro history using the 1986 library fire at the Central Library downtown as the starting off point for a wonderful walk through the creation of a Central Library, the hiring (and firing – and tumult caused by such firing) of the various head librarians who have been in charge, and an interesting look at the architecture involved in both the original building and the addition added post the fire. It was such a fun read I swallowed it over a few days after downloading it from the very library it discussed (because all the hard copies were already being borrowed).

Without reading this I wouldn’t have learned that the Atlanta library remained segregated until 1959.  Or that in the days when silence was important in libraries, head librarians summoned members of the staff to her desk (and she was often a she in those early days as being a librarian was an acceptable job for a woman) with one of those metal clickers they use to train dogs – each librarian had a morse-code like collection of clicks they would hear to tell them to come talk to their boss.  Or that in 1981 investigators found a woman selling used books out of her room at the Beverly Hills Hotel that she had taken from the LA Public Library — and she was making over $40,000 a year on that enterprise.  Who would even think up an idea like that?  Better yet, some studios would send assistants to the library to steal books needed for research so they wouldn’t have to bother remembering to renew them over the course of making the movie.

I could go on. Suffice it to say that if you LOVE books and LOVE or LOVED libraries at any time in your life, this is a fabulously interesting book to peruse this summer.

Her conclusion?  It is necessary to collect these books because “it declares that all these stories matter, and so does every effort to create something that connects us to one another, and to our past and to what is still to come.” 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library