The Monkees and Critical Studies in TV from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing [Video] (1:04)

This book signing at Book Soup was wonderful – good people, good conversation (before and after the signing). Just another example of the kind of quality positive people who have been drawn to The Monkees across generations – I even met a former head of publicity for ScreenGems who had some fun stories to tell. — Rosanne

Watch this entire presentation

The Monkees and Critical Studies in TV from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing

 

Transcript:

…but it’s not just 50 years that makes the show special. That’s not the only reason that people were paying attention to it. I think it’s the ability to analyze the artistic achievements of the writers, the actors, the directors on the program. Many of these people had earned awards later in their career with Emmys, Grammys. Oscars across the whole time and the book wants to critically study who The Monkees were as a television program. Something that challenged the new rules of a new medium and the show itself paved the way for future innovation on television. Now television itself took nearly the same 50 years to climb out of the shadow of film. People have not wanted to respect television for a long time. We didn’t have television studies. We had film studies.  That’s what important people went for, but in this time period, think about the shows that had been winning Emmys — in fact, last night we had the Emmys — so we had all the new stuff. In the last few years we’ve had Breaking Bad and Mad Men and now we have Game of Thrones and happily, Master of None won for best writing last night, so television has grown up. 

Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today!

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

 

 

A Movie Not Really About Steve Jobs from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (0:57)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

A Movie Not Really About Steve Jobs from A History of the Art of Adaptation

 

Transcript:

Hey, guess what’s in the theaters right now that’s an adaptation? We have the Steve Jobs film which comes originally from the book by Walter Isaacson. Being made into the film now which just opened. Aaron Sorkin is the screenwriter here and Aaron Sorkin fully admits in all interviews “I want you to get the feel of his life, not the facts of his life.” So he made up a bunch of stuff and added it to the movie because he thought it made a more interesting scene. It doesn’t even come from the book. It’s things he imagined maybe Jobs might have done when he was visiting with friends or having a private conversation with this daughter. And Sorkin fully admits that he was interested in studying the relationship between the father and the daughter because in his own life he has a dysfunctional relationship with his daughter and so in a couple of interviews I heard recently on NPR he came out and said, “I really just wrote a movie about me and my daughter and I threw Steve Jobs name on it.” That’s how far from the book he has taken that particular story. 

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

Dr. Rosanne Welch at Golden Leaves Presentation 2017, Cal Poly Pomona [Video]

We had a great time on Friday April 14th as the Cal Poly Pomona Library celebrated all the professors who published books this year.

Dr. Rosanne Welch at Golden Leaves Presentation 2017, Cal Poly Pomona [Video]

People laughed at the fact that I had two books to discuss – the encyclopedia I co-edited with my friend and colleague Peg Lamphier – Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia — and, of course, my book about The Monkees – Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture.

Cpp golden leaves 2017

Each author was asked to describe their book. The encyclopedia came first (since Peg’s last name is Lamphier and the practice of alphabetical discrimination lives on). I let her have the honors since I knew I would speak about The Monkees’ book last.  Going last I also had to keep in mind that the rest of the audience had already received their awards and were anxious to get back to the delightful dessert table – so humor came to the rescue as I commented on how odd it was to be speaking about my favorite television show when I was six after other professors had spoken of Immanuel Kant and architectural digs in South America and Mass Spectatorship in Modern France.

Here’s how I closed out the show…

Thanks to Doug for taking all the photos and video – and to Peg for being such a great collaborator – and to all the friends and fans who have read the book and enjoyed learning more about the 1967 Emmy Winner for Best New Comedy Series.

Buy These Books and Share Them With Your Local Librarian

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 


A History of Screenwriting – 17 in a series – Interior New York Subway, 14th St to 42nd St (Billy Bitzer, Mutoscope, 1905)

I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch


Interior New York Subway, 14th St to 42nd St (Billy Bitzer, Mutoscope, 1905)

A History of Screenwriting - 17 in a series - Interior New York Subway, 14th St to 42nd St (Billy Bitzer, Mutoscope, 1905)

“Filming just seven months after the New York subway system opened, cameraman Bitzer captures a unique tracking shot with lights provided by another train running on parallel tracks in tandem with the photographed train. The startling variations within a predetermined form make this work a fascinating predecessor of structural films.” —R. Bruce Elder

Title
Interior N.Y. subway, 14th St. to 42nd St.

Other Title
Interior New York subway, Fourteenth Street to Forty-second Street

Summary
The camera platform was on the front of a New York subway train following another train on the same track. Lighting is provided by a specially constructed work car on a parallel track. At the time of filming, the subway was only seven months old, having opened on October 27, 1904. The ride begins at 14th Street (Union Square) following the route of today’s east side IRT, and ends at the old Grand Central Station, built by Cornelius Vanderbuilt in 1869. The Grand Central Station in use today was not completed until 1913.

Contributor Names
Bitzer, G. W., 1872-1944, camera.
American Mutoscope and Biograph Company.
Paper Print Collection (Library of Congress)

Created / Published
United States : American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, 1905.

Subject Headings
– Subways–New York (State)–New York
– Transportation–New York (State)–New York
– Local transit–New York (State)–New York
– Subway stations–New York (State)–New York
– Grand Central Terminal (New York, N.Y.)

Genre
Short films
Nonfiction films
Actualities (Motion pictures)

Notes
– H61570 U.S. Copyright Office
– Copyright: American Mutoscope & Biograph Co.; 5June1905; H61570.
– Duration: 3:37 (part 1) and 2:41 (part 2) at 15 fps.
– Camera, G.W. “Billy” Bitzer.
– Photographed May 21, 1905. Location: Interborough Subway, 14 St. to 42nd St., New York, N.Y.
– Available also through the Library of Congress Web site as digital files.
– Mavis 1810601; Interior N.Y. subway, 14th St. to 42nd St.
– viewing print and dupe neg; Received: 1991 from LC lab; preservation; Paper Print Collection.
– neg pic; Received: ca. 1989 from UCLA; preservation Paper Print Collection.
– paper pos; Received: 1905-06-05; copyright deposit; Paper Print Collection.

Medium
viewing print. 1 film reel of 1 (133 ft.) : si., b&w ; 35 mm.
dupe neg. 1 film reel of 1 (133 ft.) : si., b&w ; 35 mm.
neg pic. 1 film reel of 1 (133 ft.) : si., b&w ; 35 mm.
paper pos. 1 roll (133 ft.) : si., b&w ; 35 mm.

Call Number/Physical Location
FEB 9845 (viewing print)
FPE 5550 (dupe neg)
FPE 5629 (neg pic)
LC 2057 (paper pos)

Repository
Library of Congress Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA dcu

Digital Id
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mbrsmi/lcmp002.20761

Library of Congress Control Number
00694394

Online Format
image
video

Description
The camera platform was on the front of a New York subway train following another train on the same track. Lighting is provided by a specially constructed work car on a parallel track. At the time of filming, the subway was only seven months old, having opened on October 27, 1904. The ride begins at 14th Street (Union Square) following the route of today’s east side IRT, and ends at the old Grand Central Station, built by Cornelius Vanderbuilt in 1869. The Grand Central Station in use today was not completed until 1913.

LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/00694394

More Percy Jackson from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (0:25)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

More Percy Jackson from A History of the Art of Adaptation

 

Transcript:

So, because of simply changing his age by a few years they totally tweaked how the book turned into a film and it failed, miserably. They were going to make all 5 films, but they only ended up making two. Which is really kind of amazing when you think about it because it came after Harry Potter. They had a lesson in how to do it properly and they ignored every single moment, which shocks me.

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

Nice Library Journal review of Women in American History, Edited by Rosanne Welch and Peg Lamphier

Lj review wah encyc

Today we received a nice review from the Library Journal that calls our 4-volume encyclopedia set  — Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia —  “thorough,” “enlightening,” and “recommended.”

We share these compliments with all of who contributed to the project and hope you find copies in your local library to enjoy!

Wamh cover 1 Wamh cover 2 Wah encyc cover 3 Wah encyc 4

Please share this set with your local librarian!

A History of Screenwriting – 16 in a series – Imperial Japanese Dance (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1894)

I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch


Imperial Japanese Dance (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1894)

A History of Screenwriting - 16 in a series - Imperial Japanese Dance (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1894)

From Raff & Gammon price list: Three Japanese ladies in the costumes of their country.

From Edison films catalog: A charming representation of The Mikado dance by three beautiful Japanese ladies in full costume. Very effective when colored. 45 feet. $6.75.

OTHER TITLES
Title in Maguire & Gammon catalogue: Japanese dance 

CREATED/PUBLISHED
United States : Edison Manufacturing Co., [1894]

NOTES
Copyright: no reg. 

Performers: Sarashe Sisters. 

Camera, William Heise. 

Filmed ca. October-November 1894, in Edison’s Black Maria studio. 

SUBJECTS
Dance–United States.
Dancers–United States.
Japanese–United States.
Dance
Musical

RELATED NAMES
Dickson, W. K.-L. (William Kennedy-Laurie), 1860-1935, production.
Heise, William, camera.
Sarashe Sisters, performers.
Thomas A. Edison, Inc. 
AFI/Holt (H.L.) Collection (Library of Congress) 

DIGITAL ID 
edmp.4031 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mbrsmi/edmp.4031 


Learn more about Thomas Edison and Early Movies with these books and videos

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 

A History of Screenwriting – 15 in a series – Athlete with Wand (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1894)

I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch


Athlete with Wand (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1894)

A History of Screenwriting - 15 in a series - Athlete with Wand (W. K. L. Dickson, USA, 1894)


Learn more about Thomas Edison and Early Movies with these books and videos

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 

The Monkees and the 50 Year Charm from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing, Book Soup, Hollywood [Video] (0:57)

This book signing at Book Soup was wonderful – good people, good conversation (before and after the signing). Just another example of the kind of quality positive people who have been drawn to The Monkees across generations – I even met a former head of publicity for ScreenGems who had some fun stories to tell. — Rosanne

Watch this entire presentation

The Monkees and the 50 Year Charm from Why The Monkees Matter Book Signing, Book Soup, Hollywood

 

 

Transcript:

Now, a deep study into anything can teach us much about everything. it’s why we teach critical studies in television in the first place and that’s why I wrote the book for my students, but I also wrote it in honor of — and to honor — all the fans who have loved the show hoping to see these people in concert again when they grow up and that dream was actually realized in the last so many generations and so that is pretty amazing. What’s interesting about The Monkees to me is anything that reaches the 50-year mark tends to get a little bit more respect finally. The Hula Hoop went from a kids craze to a staple in physical education classes. Today, it’s considered a very important thing. War surplus spam has become hip because people in  Hawaii started to eat it and then it was cool because that’s where it came from. Now Spam. you can go eat at restaurants. I don’t know why you would, but people do. This book, it tends to show how the 50-year charm has proven true for The Monkees.

Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today!

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

 

 

Adapting Percy Jackson from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (0:54)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Adapting Percy Jackson from A History of the Art of Adaptation

 

Transcript:

Now, the excellent work adapting Harry Potter was tossed away when they adapted the Rick Riordan series that my son loved — Percy Jackson. Loved these books and in many ways, they are ripoffs of Harry Potter. They just really are. I’m sorry. Kid finds out he’s a Greek god instead of the wizard. What’s the difference? All right, I going to be powerful and save the world. The problem is when they went to make these into movies they didn’t trust the source material. In the film version, this boy is 17. In the book, he’s 12. The thing that a child can say to his parents at 12 sound ridiculous and whiny if a 17-year-old says them. So they destroyed the support for that character by making him older and they only did that so that his best friend — his Hermoine — in the books can actually be the hot chick he wants to have a relationship with in the older books. So we don’t care about 12-year-olds having it we want the 16-year-old to have a girlfriend.

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube