Video: Martha’s Future from Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A clip from this longer presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dw feminism 30 martha future anim

 

Watch this entire presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) speaks on “Feminism in the Whoniverse” of Doctor Who, the BBC television program now in its 50th year. She reviews each of the Doctor’s female companions and speaks on how they are represented in the program and how they represented the women of their respective periods.

Transcript:

I happen to think it’s an excellent ending for Martha because she didn’t get the first man she wanted, but she found another one of equal value that she could build a life with and, in fact, they grow up to be rogue alien hunters. So, she’s still doing exactly what she did, so losing the man didn’t force her to lose the job that she had with that man. She re-built it with somebody else. To me, that’s very strong.

Feminism in the Whoniverse was presented at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library where Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

This is the 4th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who that Dr. Welch has presented. You can find these talks using the links below.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

Video: Substantial Women from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

Monkees 15 substantial women anim

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

So, I learned as a child — think, or that’s what I posit — that if I wanted to marry a Monkee, I didn’t want to be popular. I wanted to be substantial. I wanted to be a woman of some meaning and that’s what would attract them. And I think that’s a really important message to give little girls. Not that I need to be gorgeous and have the perfect little outfit, right? So feminism is all through this thing. 

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: Martha and Mickey from Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A clip from this longer presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dw feminism 29 martha mickey anim

 

Watch this entire presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) speaks on “Feminism in the Whoniverse” of Doctor Who, the BBC television program now in its 50th year. She reviews each of the Doctor’s female companions and speaks on how they are represented in the program and how they represented the women of their respective periods.

Transcript:

Now, this all became an interesting question. We see that she has married Mickey, who was once Rose’s boyfriend way back in the day. This happens because — production. When they filmed the episode that said goodbye to David Tennant, they wanted him to see all his previous friends, right, and they wanted them all to have a moment where they saw him before he regenerated. When tehy scheduled these two actors, both of them had other jobs in films. They had only one day in which to film their scene. it was the morning they were both free. So , how was he going to come up with a scene that involves them both. Being a writer he thought, “Wouldn’t it be fun it Smith and Jones got married.” So that’s what he did. He ended up getting some flack for that because there were people who though what he was saying was people of color always have to only marry each other. No, he was saying these two actors couldn’t show up any day but today. Ok? So you have to have a little understanding of those — the process of production.

Feminism in the Whoniverse was presented at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library where Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

This is the 4th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who that Dr. Welch has presented. You can find these talks using the links below.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

Photos: Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dawn Comer Jefferson at Heads Are Turning, Children Are Learning – California African-American Museum Celebrates Children’s Literacy

Dr Rosanne Welch and Dawn Comer Jefferson at Heads Are Turning Children Are Learning  California African American Museum Celebrates Children s Literacy  4

One Saturday March 23rd my co-author Dawn Comer Jefferson and I were invited to the California African American Museum (CAAM) for their annual literacy day, this year titled “Heads are Turning, Children are Learning”.  We presented a workshop on African American on the Oregon Trail, based on the research we did for the story in our children’s book The Promise which involves an enslaved family taken on the Oregon Trail with the promise of freedom if they survive.  Sadly, when they all arrive in Oregon, the owner frees the parents but not the children since he had never mentioned the children in their original deal.  

About 20 children and parents attended the workshop and participated in an exercise where they wrote a letter back to family and friends about their experience on the Oregon Trail.  It was fun to hear what parts of the presentation they remembered enough to include in their letters and to see them enjoy a chance to be creative.  

See a complete slide show of all 72 photos on Flickr

Video: Feminist Characters from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

Monkees 14 feminist characters

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

The very first woman that we met was the Princess of the Duchy of Harmonica. So, we’re being funny, but she was a princess who had the opportunity to marry Davy Jones — every girl’s dream in that period. She turned it down because she had a duty to her country to go home and be its ruler. If that’s not an empowered young woman — what a cool thing, right? And then just very imply Julie Newmar who you know as the Catwoman from Batman she guests on an episode where they all wanted her to fall in love with them and the line was, “The fastest way to a woman’s heart is through her mind.” Through her mind! And so each boy tries to do the things she claims to enjoy. Poetry, classical music, ballet, all these high end things, not some silly nonsense.  

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: Martha and Relationships from Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A clip from this longer presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dw feminism 28 martha relationships anim

 

Watch this entire presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) speaks on “Feminism in the Whoniverse” of Doctor Who, the BBC television program now in its 50th year. She reviews each of the Doctor’s female companions and speaks on how they are represented in the program and how they represented the women of their respective periods.

Transcript:

Martha is cool enough, first of all, to travel with The Doctor. Second of all, she’s going to end up joining UNIT and being just like Liz Shaw, a female assistant through the military connection that he has — and that’s a pretty cool thing. And then, she’s going to end up married To Mickey. Now, this become an interesting question. She, following Rose, is the second person to fall in love with The Doctor. Now, we can’t have everyone do that or the show gets boring, so we know that they can’t end up together and he can’t all in love with her too because then he’s just sort of a wander Romeo and then we lose all respect for him. Ok? If the TARDIS is just like his purple couch, This is a bad thing. It changes the whole point of the show. So, we have to deal with Martha – who recognizes how she feels. Tells the boy how she feels about him — which is a very empowering thing to do. Gets told he can’t feel the same way and doesn’t fall apart. She does the thing that is best for her. She leaves him. She says “Goodbye” of her own choosing, so that she can continue her life. She does not make the mistake that Sarah Jane made 15 years ago. She is smarter and more together than that. So, I think she’s a pretty interesting character.

Feminism in the Whoniverse was presented at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library where Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

This is the 4th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who that Dr. Welch has presented. You can find these talks using the links below.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

Video: Feminism from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers

 


Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

Feminism is what struck me, because we’re all little girls watching this program and because of the way TV today. something that I — I do enjoy The Big Bang Theory, but really it’s a show about who’s going to have sex with which girl this week and that’s kind of what happens to females on TV sometimes these days. Because we had rules back in the day. Four musicians should be about that, too, and yet they weren’t. Every girl that they met on this program in 58 episodes had her own job, took care of herself, was going to school, cared about the culture, and the world, was involved insocial justice issues. Nobody was a cheerleader. Nobody was “Rah, Rah, Look at me! I’ma ditzy blonde and I have no brain.” They were all intelligent, interesting, young women. 

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

Video: Martha Jones from Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A clip from this longer presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

 

Watch this entire presentation – Doctor Who: Feminism in the Whoniverse with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://rosannewelch.com) speaks on “Feminism in the Whoniverse” of Doctor Who, the BBC television program now in its 50th year. She reviews each of the Doctor’s female companions and speaks on how they are represented in the program and how they represented the women of their respective periods.

Transcript:

Rose is an interesting character, so there are those that say, “Yes, she’s a feminist character” and then those that say, “eh. She’s not very smart.” So, what qualifies. She has made choices in her life and the choices, in my opinion, are what qualify. She is followed by Martha Jones. The very first companion of color, which is a very big thing for Doctor Who and also, what’s her job, before she travels? She’s an actual doctor. Which, I think is the loveliest job we have given any of The Doctor’s companions. Somebody who is equally intellectually his match. No question about it. Not only do I do test-tubey things at Cambridge, I fix bodies. And, in later episodes we’ll talk about The Doctor as a healer. So she is the ultimate healer and she’s a female and a female of color. Right? She has bucked the system that doesn’t always assist both women and people of color to attain these types of heights, if you will. 

Feminism in the Whoniverse was presented at the Cal Poly Pomona University Library where Dr. Welch teaches in the IGE (Interdisciplinary General Education) program.

This is the 4th talk on various aspects of Doctor Who that Dr. Welch has presented. You can find these talks using the links below.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

 

Video: Androgynous Clothing from “Why Monkees Matter” with Dr. Rosanne Welch

A Clip from this longer presentation: Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers



Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Why Monkees Matter: How The Writing Staff of The Monkees Brought the 1960s Counter Culture to Mainstream Pre-Teen Viewers at the 2014 Cal Poly Pomona Provost’s Symposium on Faculty Scholarship (http://www.cpp.edu/~research/)

Transcript:

This is my androgynous clothing slide, just to cover that for a moment. The poncho. The colors. I mean how could you do that? This is in their second season. In their first season they appeared like that. Much more 50’s-ish verging on  early 60’s. A little Frankie Valli thing going on. So look at the change that was brought to their viewers in just one season where you could see truly the Hippie Culture in its clothing.

View photos from this presentation 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents on "Why Monkees Matter" at Cal Poly Pomona - 21

Description:

Based on a chapter in my upcoming book The Metatextual Menagerie that was The Monkees, which includes a series of interviews conducted with surviving writers and performers of the 1960s television program, The Monkees I will discuss how the writers and actors used the show as a platform for their own emerging counter culture/anti-war messages.

Worth studying for its craft and place in television history (the show won an Emmy as Best Comedy Of 1967) the program’s true importance may come from its impact on the politics and culture of the era. Considered innocuous by the network, thepress and the parents of the era, the storylines and jokes created by the writers and the actor’s ad-libs brought the emerging counter-culture to the attention of young teens whose parents might not have appreciated the message. Cultural icons such as Timothy Leary recognized the subversive nature of the program, seen through the writing and in choices made about costuming, hair length, musical guests (Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, Charlie Smalls) and songs performed by the band brought issues of Vietnam, voting and civil rights to the ‘young generation’ for whom the show clearly had ‘somethin’to say.

Subscribe to Dr. Welch’s YouTube Channel

About the Symposium:

The 2014 Provost’s Symposium is a forum to learn about each other’s scholarly work, make new friends, renew old acquaintances, and enhance our appreciation of the rich and diverse array of professional endeavors pursued by the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona.

My thoughts on attending the recent “Othering and Belonging” Conference sponsored by the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society at UC Berkeley

Othering and Belonging Conference Logo

I wanted to tell you all about the first (hopefully annual) Othering and Belonging Conference sponsored by the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society at UC Berkeley that I attended recently in Oakland, California where I had the great pleasure of listening to a panel discussion between feminist film scholar and all around philosopher, bell hooks (all in small letters like my poetic icon e.e. cummings) and john a. powell (who admitted copying his small lettered name from bell), as well as hearing from author Andrew Solomon and columnist Charles Blow and Judith Smith, Artistic Director and Founding Member of AXIS, a physically integrated dance company of abled and disabled dancers.

From my split persona as a Writer-Producer/Writer-Professor I see the issue of othering in the prism of media and how it can help or hinder the way viewers ‘other’. 

Othering and Belonging Conference Speakers

I can only hope there will be more of these conferences scattered across the country in the coming years as it was insightful and inspirational – even if sometimes I was saddened by the idea that they were preaching to the choir. But the speakers were clear that it was my job as a choir member (read: professor and writer) to go back out into the community and speak to others – about othering, which is a concept I learned of while teaching a thematically based history course.

Othering was a word I had rarely (if ever) heard in the course of my own higher education and one that invariably brings the question “What is Othering?” — even from other academics — when I mention it. I believe my colleague, Dr. Peg Lamphier (who attended the conference with me) put it best when mentoring me into teaching the thematic history course. She said the recipe for othering was to take two groups with a difference and allow one group to feel superior due to that difference (like the way European explorers who believed in a religion based on one God felt superior to the Native Americans and tribal Africans they colonized in the Age of Discovery because those groups believed in a religion based on the worship of many gods) — and so the Europeans thereby used that supposed superiority to oppress the (often darker-skinned) other. That makes some people think othering and racism are one and the same, but in fact racism is only one way in which to other someone. You can other people who look just like you as long as one minor detail about them (maybe their sexual orientation) lets you say they are “not like me” enough.

I also appreciate this description of Othering “any action by which an individual or group becomes mentally classified in somebody’s mind as “not one of us”. Rather than always remembering that every person is a complex bundle of emotions, ideas, motivations, reflexes, priorities, and many other subtle aspects, it’s sometimes easier to dismiss them as being in some way less human, and less worthy of respect and dignity, than we are.” Thanks to the website “There are No Others: A Catalogue Of ‘Othering” which I ran across while writing this piece. It’s a website that mentioned things like the reaction to Rae in Hunger Games being just ‘some black girl’ and some viewers admission that that caused them to cry less when she was gone.

Link: Othering 101: What Is “Othering”? from There Are No Others blog

We can spend hours finding ways in which the human race has othered each other over millennia and we can spend hours defending their need to do that for survival (as in sometimes men who follow women into dark alleys might have nefarious plans so women should assume the worst and NOT walk into dark alleys alone at night). But the question of the conference, which was printed on the reusable bags they gave, was the real question worth spending hours on:

“How can we think about, talk about, and give birth to a society in which everyone belongs?”

So how DID the conference planners think about giving birth to a society in which everyone belongs – they began with a discussion of mothering – or more generically parenting – with the opening night Keynote speaker Andrew Solomon (author of Far From the Tree). Solomon began his extremely well-written, well-performed and deeply honest talk with a medical definition of homosexuality from the 1960s – the decade of his birth. By that definition, Solomon was immediately othered, which brought him an interest in how the other others in society are treated – and because of the way his mother handled things, he wondered how other parents deal with children who are othered – whether from physical or mental disabilities. The stories he told of families embracing children with dwarfism or autism or many other ‘differences’ made us cry – and laugh – and made me order the book immediately. Solomon ended his talk with the news that he himself now had children – something unimaginable in his childhood where homosexuality was marked as a crime.

Solomon used a quote from his mother to bookend the lecture: “The love you have for your children is like no other love in the world and until you have children, you don’t know what it’s like.” It was a phrase he said he took as the greatest compliment when he was young but later came to anger him once he had come out of the closet and believed he would never be legally allowed to have children — But after he had his own children, he realized his mother was right. Solomon studied several families to learn how they managed children with identities that didn’t match the parents’ identity. He wanted to study how parents and children accepted each other and he found that love and acceptance were two different things. The beauty of his – and everyone else’s presentation across the weekend – was the focus on how learning to love and working on the skill of loving – really loving each other – is the only solution to acceptance.

Andrew Solomon TED Talk  – Love No Matter What

What worked about the conference was that it wasn’t a purely academic exchange of professors reading from papers about deeply detailed concepts about obscure old films (not that all academic conferences are like that, but some are…). This one involved community activists like Alana Banks and Alicia Garza of #BlackLivesMatter and organizers and writers and middle school teachers AND professors – and the presenters were polished speakers sharing insights on this much larger issue of life for all of us — How can we give birth to a society in which everyone belongs? As I said earlier, from I see this issue in the prism of media and how it can help/hinder othering. We are what we see. Many sociologists believe the existence of Will and Grace as a top ten tv show helped move America forward on the issue of gay rights/same-sex marriage faster than any other social movement in our history – that includes slavery, which took 200 years to fix and African American civil rights, which took a hundred years to fix. While I know Will and Grace can’t take all the credit, I do believe the weekly exposure to an openly gay character who was the first one to come into their homes helped – much the same way people purchasing Frank Sinatra records opened up their acceptance of Italians into mainstream American life (yep, when my grandfather first came here the signs read “No Dogs of Dagos allowed”) and the same way Cagney and Lacey brought the idea of females in the police force and in the military into our living rooms. Or in the more recent media world, how the paraplegic characters Jason Street on Friday Night Lights and Artie Abrams on Glee brought the experience of a disabled person who was not looking to be cured into our homes. (that’s in opposition to the cult-famous return of the Brady Bunch TV movies where Bobby began in a wheelchair but was then ‘cured’). This form of ‘other’ was discussed by Judith Smith the Artistic Director and Founding Member of AXIS, a physically integrated dance company of abled and disabled dancers, who had become disabled in a car accident when she was 17. She represented one of the ways a person can begin life belonging but then be thrust into the role of ‘other’ and have to adjust quite immediately.

And finally there was the conversation between bell hooks and john a. powell during which their genuine friendship was evident and which imbued their discussion with the love they both advocated as the only solution – taking the time to know others so that we can come to love others.

One thought that kept recurring to me was that this message of love – of motherly and parental love – is often dismissed and considered ‘sappy’ when delivered by women – the mothers of our world whether they be famous leaders or local neighbors – but when men like professor powell organize an entire weekend around the idea, love suddenly becomes masculine and academic and strong – which it always was. So why does it take men to make this concept strong – don’t get me wrong, I want this message to be disseminated to everyone everywhere, and I’m glad they are stepping up to the conversation in order to address this issue of othering – but I’m saddened that the very othering of women kept anyone from listening to us earlier — say when we were all being told these things by our own mothers…

We can and will talk about how the media influences society as the weeks go by – if you have any comments or ideas to share, let me know via the comments, email at rosanne@welchwrite.com or via Twitter at @RosanneWelch and we’ll develop your ideas as we go – in much the same way the conference planners hoped the conversation would continue. As to the conference, I’ll wrap up this wrap up by returning to Andrew Solomon for the theme that came from the entire conference: We must all work toward sending the message that it is our differences and our negotiation of difference that unite us. That is how we can give birth to a society in which everyone belongs.

***