Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 40 in a series – Gender Bending

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The overall feminist discourse nurtured by the creative team on the show continued in the second season. “Wild Monkees” offers a look at both feminism and masculinity with a side order of gender-bending when a pack of female bikers arrives at a broken down old hotel where the band is playing, while also working as bell hops and waiters to earn the right to play. Upon their arrival, swathed in sunglasses, helmets and scarves, the female bikers are assumed to be men until one of them kisses Davy, revealing herself to be a female to the audience and to Davy. 

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

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The overall feminist discourse nurtured by the creative team on the show continued in the second season. “Wild Monkees” offers a look at both feminism and masculinity with a side order of gender-bending when a pack of female bikers arrives at a broken down old hotel where the band is playing, while also working as bell hops and waiters to earn the right to play. Upon their arrival, swathed in sunglasses, helmets and scarves, the female bikers are assumed to be men until one of them kisses Davy, revealing herself to be a female to the audience and to Davy.

From the Index… The S’s – “Why The Monkees Matter”

Wonder what and who I mentioned in “Why The Monkees Matter”? Check out these index entries!

Sager, Carole Bayer  53

“Salesman”  30

Sandoval, Andrew  7, 40

Sammy Davis Jr. Show, The  68

Sanford and Son  53, 117

Sanford, Lee  115

Sargent, Herbert  113

Saturday Night Live  113

“Saturday’s Child”  79

Sawyer, Diane  130-131

Schlitt, Robert (Bob)  20, 29, 50, 58, 63, 65, 86-87, 89, 126

Schisgal, Murray  112

Schneider, Bert  24, 44-47, 84, 94, 97, 104, 115, 127, 146

Schultz, Charles  69

Scooby Doo  49

Secret Life of the American Teenager, The  22

Seeger, Pete  34, 40

Seinfeld, Jerry  121, 145

Selleck, Tom  119

Seneca Falls Convention  56

Sergeant Bilko  72

Seventh Heaven  155

77 Sunset Strip  15-16, 105

Sex and the City  65

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band  7, 19, 24, 135

Shaw, Reta  77-78

“She Hangs Out”  148

Shepherd, Gerald  97-98

Sherman, Bobby  130-132, 151

Shindell, Richard  149

Shindig  19, 122, 132

Silverman, Treva  40, 50-52, 56, 70, 78-80, 91, 101-102, 113, 126, 135, 137

Simpsons, The  154

Sinatra, Frank  8, 49

Singer, Alex  98

16Magazine  136

Smalls, Charlie  69

Smith, Will  8

Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, The  6, 20, 34

“So You Want To Be A Rock ‘n’ Roll Star”  148, 151

Solid Gold Cadillac  105

Some Like It Hot  87, 111

“Some Like It Lukewarm”  63, 65, 66, 69, 110-112,

“Sometime in the Morning”  21, 39, 63

“The Son of a Gypsy”  78, 132, 136

Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour, The  20

Soprano’s The  72

Sotomayor, Sonya  6

Spencer, Alfred E.  105

Spitting Image  154

Splendor in the Grass  17

Spongebob Squarepants  155

“The Spy Who Came In From The Cool”  38, 78, 86, 90, 114, 126

Smith, Roger  15

Star Trek  68, 79, 114, 131, 139, 152-153

Star Trek: The Next Generation  107

Starr, Ringo  125, 154

Steinbeck, John  115

Steinem, Gloria  113

Stevens, Connie  15

Stills, Stephen  36, 123, 148

Stipe, Michael  149

Stone Poneys  89

Stonewall Riots  26

Streets of San Francisco, The  105

“Success Story”  20, 35, 54, 98, 109, 117, 137

Summer Stock  105

Sunset Boulevard Riots  13, 36, 39, 69

Swan Lake  91

Switch  119

Sylvester, Ward  47, 51, 91, 118, 124, 135, 139

 
 

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

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Timeless Themes and The Monkees from An Interview with Dr. Rosanne Welch, Author of “Why The Monkees Matter” on the Zilch Podcast [Audio]

A clip of an interview with Dr. Rosanne Welch, author of “Why The Monkees Matter” from Zilch: A Monkee’s Podcast: Episode 48.

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 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

 

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Timothy Leary & The Monkees from 1960’s TV Censorship and The Monkees with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (1:04)

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Timothy Leary & The Monkees from 1960's TV Censorship and The Monkees with Dr. Rosanne Welch

 

“1960s TV Censorship and The Monkees” gives a brief overview of where censorship standards were in the era – and how The Monkees pushed the envelope with its mentions of the Vietnam War – and Sunset Strip riots – and even with the outrageous storytelling behind “Frodis Caper”, the episode that celebrated the saving of an alien plant that very closely resembled a marijuana plant…  

Writer Treva Silverman said the staff got away with such jokes because the network executives were just old enough not to understand any of the references.
Presented at Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting classes on Friday, August 5, 2016

Transcript:

Timothy Leary back in the day actually wrote about them in one of his books and he wrote — I think this is very funny — “An early Christian electronic satire” or “a jolly Buddha laugh at hypocrisy.” so he saw right through what they were doing while other people were missing it. it’s in “The Politics of Ecstasy” and I like the particular phrase down here, they “use the new energies to sing the new songs and pass on a new message” and the message is really important because this show was being aired and was being watched by 13, 14 and 15 year olds. Their older brothers and sisters were already into The Beatles, right, but these younger kids move into the 70’s — these are the kids that are protesting the Vietnam War. So they got this message early on in their life. Micky Dolenz, this is line he gave in one of the episodes after he ranted about something and then he looked at the screen and said that. One of the things I love about the show is its metatextuality and that is something that I wrote about in the book, which not all shows do, but when you break the 4th wall and you address the audience, they did that all the time. Which is a very older style thing. Of course, it’s a Shakespearean thing. George Burns and Gracie Allen did it all the time. They did it all the time which I think is very funny. 


Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

 

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About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

To Sir, with Love – A great teacher memoir to revisit

Okay – so I’m odd. I read the obituaries – because I figure if you make it in the obituaries you had to have done something interesting in your life and I ought to know about you. But it also tends to serve as a sad reminder of writers we have lost and books I need to have read. So when I read the obituary for E.R. Braithwaite, author or “To Sir, With Love” (which most people only recognize as a Sidney Poitier movie) I thought – hey, I just graded a bunch of student work. I need a good book to read for a day and I’ve always liked the “teacher” genre of books, so why not? 

So I just finished the book (borrowed from my local library as an ebook to my Kindle) and very much enjoyed it. The story of the Guyanese gentleman leaving World War II military service and becoming a teacher to low income children in London’s East End — teaching them to respect him in order to learn to respect themselves — was quite beautiful. He also discusses his mixed race romance (which later becomes a marriage) with another teacher in a frank and honest manner. But mostly he talks about the students and what they lack, what they need, how to reach them — and teach them — and eventually befriend them – always by keeping respect at the front of every encounter.

The book reminded me of all the teacher genre books I’ve enjoyed over the years – from the later Anne of Green Gables books (by Lucy Maude Montgomery) to Up the Down Staircase by Bel Kaufman (which I both performed in in high school theatre and directed when I taught high school drama) to My Posse Don’t Do Homework (by LouAnne Johnson) to ‘Tis: A Memoir by Frank McCourt. What I find funny reading them nowadays is how obvious successful teaching is and yet how few can actually do it well. 

Sadly, I remember the film never mentioned his romance as mixed race relationships were taboo by the Hays Code  — yet Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, also from 1967 (and also starring Sidney Poitier) made it the focal point of their film. Perhaps if they had waited to make To Sir a few years later, it could have been included.  That, of course, proves the point I tried to instill in my son years ago – always read the book that goes to a film because that is the only way to get the full story.

From Amazon.com…

With opportunities for black men limited in post–World War II London, Rick Braithwaite, a former Royal Air Force pilot and Cambridge-educated engineer, accepts a teaching position that puts him in charge of a class of angry, unmotivated, bigoted white teenagers whom the system has mostly abandoned. When his efforts to reach these troubled students are met with threats, suspicion, and derision, Braithwaite takes a radical new approach. He will treat his students as people poised to enter the adult world. He will teach them to respect themselves and to call him “Sir.” He will open up vistas before them that they never knew existed. And over the course of a remarkable year, he will touch the lives of his students in extraordinary ways, even as they in turn, unexpectedly and profoundly, touch his.

Adapting The Outsiders from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (1:14)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

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Adapting The Outsiders from A History of the Art of Adaptation

 

Transcript:

The Godfather leads us to The Outsiders which was also done by Francis Ford Coppola and that’s because — this is probably, along with In Cold Blood, one of the most faithful adaptions of a novel ever into a film and that’s because — I love this too, because it’s the power of the audience — a group of fourth graders who loved The Godfather — I don’t know how they quite saw it – but they understood that Francis Ford Coppola was a very important director — they sent him a copy of The Outsiders with a not asking him to direct the movie version and he was like, “Well, I’ve never heard of this book. I suppose I’ll read it.” He read it. HR thought, “Wow this is pretty good. I can do that” and he made sure, because of what the children had written him– he made sure to be as faithful to that book as he could. If you watch that movie with the novel in your hand, nothing happens that doesn’t happen in the novel and he uses almost everything in the novel. There’s nothing that gets left behind. Now it’s a small — it’s a slim little novel, but it’s an amazing piece of adaptation. It is a perfect copy of that novel and it’s funny because people dismiss it because it’s a teen book — a pre-teen book at this stage — but it’s really, really and excellent example of how to do an adaptation properly. So audiences for this are hugely popular.    

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 39 in a series – No Love For Mike

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Quotes from

It is interesting to note that the writers never created an episode around a love interest for Mike’s character, possibly because the audience knew from reading popular magazines that Nesmith was the only married actor in The Monkees. It was standard practice in this era not to make married actors into ladies men when possible. Producers felt the audience did not want to feel guilty when watching their favorite stars.

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

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From the Index… The T’s – “Why The Monkees Matter”

Wonder what and who I mentioned in “Why The Monkees Matter”? Check out these index entries!

Tayback, Vic  21, 70, 73

Taylor, Rip  92

Teen Wolf  114

Television Parts  155

Temple, Shirley  13

Ten Little Indians  113

That Girl  13, 55

That Was The Week That Was  46, 113

30 Rock  109

Thriller  117

Tick, The  155

Tiger Beat  124

Tinker, Grant  96

Tolkien, J.R.R.  31

“Too Many Girls”  77, 88, 98, 116, 132

Tootsie  111

Top of the Pops  66

Tork, Peter  2, 3, 6-7, 10, 14, 21-22, 24-27, 29-37, 39-41, 45, 47, 50, 52, 55, 59-63, 65, 69-70, 72-76, 78, 80-81, 87-93, 95-100, 103-104, 107-109, 111-112, 115, 118, 120-121, 123-129, 132, 134-138, 140, 142-145, 148-149, 151-152, 154-156

Transcendental Meditation  32

Treasure of the Sierra Madre, The  91

Trillin, Calvin  113

Truffaut, Francois  43

Tubor, Morton  96

Tucker, Larry  27, 44, 46, 57, 84

Tuesdays with Morrie  133

Turteltaub, Saul  113

Turtles, The  152

TV Guide  17, 83, 89, 144

Twain, Mark  112

26th Amendment  156

Twilight Zone, The  84

Two and a Half Men  53

 
 

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

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Why are we still talking about The Monkees? from An Interview with Dr. Rosanne Welch, Author of “Why The Monkees Matter” on the Zilch Podcast [Audio]

A clip of an interview with Dr. Rosanne Welch, author of “Why The Monkees Matter” from Zilch: A Monkee’s Podcast: Episode 48.

Listen to this clip

Zilch48

Listen to the complete Zilch Podcast: Episode 48


Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

 

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Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 38 in a series – Beauty AND Brains

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

Feminist ideology could not be any more prominent than the opening line of “I Was a 99 lb. Weakling” when Micky tells his current girlfriend Brenda,

“You know, physical beauty isn’t enough.  I guess that’s why I fell in love with you, Brenda. I wanted a girl with some intelligence.”   

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition