Kate Fuglei and Dr. Rosanne Welch – The Mentoris Project Book Launch Party And Reading

Kate Fuglei and Dr. Rosanne Welch - The Mentoris Project Book Launch Party And Reading

Kate Fuglei and Dr. Rosanne Welch

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The Mentoris Project Book Launch Party And Reading With Dr. Rosanne Welch

I was deeply honored to be asked to read a section of my novel America’s Forgotten Founding Father (on the life of Filippo Mazzei) at the launch party for the entire Mentoris Book Project, which includes over 30 books about famous Italians and Italian Americans. At the Italian Cultural Institute in Westwood over a hundred family and friends gathered to celebrate this new publishing venture created by Robert Barbera under the umbrella of his Barbera Foundation. The evening also offered the chance to meet the director of the Italian Cultural Institute, Valeria Rumori and her cultural attache, Leonilde Callocchia.

A selection of Mentoris Project Books Now Available

See a complete collection of Mentoris Project Books

 

The Mentoris Project Book Launch Party and Reading with Dr. Rosanne Welch

The Mentoris Project Book Launch Party and Reading with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch reads from America’s Forgotten Founding Father

I was deeply honored to be asked to read a section of my novel America’s Forgotten Founding Father (on the life of Filippo Mazzei) at the launch party for the entire Mentoris Book Project, which includes over 30 books about famous Italians and Italian Americans. At the Italian Cultural Institute in Westwood over a hundred family and friends gathered to celebrate this new publishing venture created by Robert Barbera under the umbrella of his Barbera Foundation. The evening also offered the chance to meet the director of the Italian Cultural Institute, Valeria Rumori and her cultural attache, Leonilde Callocchia.

The Mentoris Project Book Launch Party and Reading with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch and Robert Barbera, Founder of The Barbera Foundation and The Mentoris Project

The Mentoris Project Book Launch Party and Reading with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Books for sale


Print Edition | Kindle Edition | Apple iBooks Edition | Nook Edition


It was especially nice that my mother Mary was on hand as she is the youngest child of the immigrants who brought our family to America, and my son Joseph, who is their great grandchild — and of course my wonderful husband Douglas, who recorded the event and took all the photos, which means, of course, that he does not appear in any of them. 

Mary Danko and Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch and Mary Danko

The Mentoris Project Book Launch Party and Reading with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Mary Danko, Joseph “Guiseppe” Welch and Dr. Rosanne Welch

Many thanks to Robert and to Ken LaZebnik, editor of the series who invited me along for the ride and to all the local Stephens MFA students who came out to support their professors in this new venture.

The Mentoris Project Book Launch Party and Reading with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Fellow Mentoris Author, Pamela Winfrey, signs her book, “Marconi and His Muses”

The Mentoris Project Book Launch Party and Reading with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Fellow Mentoris Author (Soldier, Diplomat, Archaeologist: A Novel Based On The Bold Life Of Louis Palma Di Cesnola), Dr. Peg Lamphier and Dr. Rosanne Welch

Encyclopedia of Women in American History named to the 2018 Outstanding References Sources List by Reference and User Services Association (RUSA), a division of the American Library Association

More great news for our ABC-CLIO Encyclopedia on Women in American History — Rosanne

Encyclopedia of Women in American History named to the 2018 Outstanding References Sources List by Reference and User Services Association (RUSA), a division of the American Library Association

Encyclopedia of Women in American History, edited by Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Peg Lamphier, has been named to the 2018 Outstanding References Sources List, an annual list selected by experts of the Collection Development and Evaluation Section (CODES) of the Reference and User Services Association (RUSA), a division of the American Library Association.

The Outstanding Reference Sources Committee was established in 1958 to recommend the most outstanding reference publications published the previous year for small and medium-sized public and academic libraries. The selected titles are valuable reference resources and are highly recommended for inclusion in any library’s reference collections.

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Find it on Amazon.com

Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Peg Lamphier

Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Peg Lamphier highlighted in Special Collections Library Display at Cal Poly Pomona

I was visiting — along with my IGE class — the fine folks at the Special Collections Room at the Cal Poly Pomona Library today.

They were happy to show me —in preparation for a Women in Leadership conference coming to the university this quarter — that they’ve filled their display cases with samples of the work of female professors across the history of CPP.

Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dr. Peg Lamphier highlighted in Special Collections Library Display at Cal Poly Pomona

Click for larger image

This means, of course, that my and Peg Lamphier’s encyclopedia (Women in American History) is on display along with photos of us from a campus newspaper interview about that project.

There is also a photo taken when Peg was voted a Top 5 Koofer Professor

Nice to see them recognizing women and their part of the school’s history.

My 3rd Year Performing in The Vagina Monologues at Cal Poly Pomona, Friday, February 2, 2018, 7pm

For the 3rd year running I’ll be performing in the Cal Poly Pomona Women’s Resource Center’s Production of The Vagina Monologues

This performance is open to the public and takes place at:

Cal Poly Pomona Theater
Cal Poly Pomona
3801 W Temple Ave, Pomona, CA 91768

February 2, 2018
7pm

You can buy your tickets via Venmo (@sammiechaffino) or at the door.

SAS VaginaMonologues

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The Vagina Monologues, 2016

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Opening Remarks at The Industry in Our Backyard: Television Production in Los Angeles 1940s-1980s [Photo]

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Opening Remarks at The Industry in Our Backyard: Television Production in Los Angeles 1940s-1980s [Photo]

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Dr. Rosanne Welch presents her opening remarks for the photo exhibition…

The Industry in Our Backyard: Television Production in Los Angeles 1940s-1980s

Runs Thursday, January 18, 2018 to Sunday, July 15, 2018 Central Library, History and Genealogy Department, LL4

From Lucy to ALF, from game shows to talk shows, from local news to the made-for-TV movie, The Industry In Our Backyard: Television Production In Los Angeles 1940s-1980s showcases four decades in the life of the medium that dominated American culture, yet for Angelenos, was just another part of daily life. The images displayed in the exhibit were largely taken by photographers from the Herald Examiner and the Valley Times newspapers, who were granted exclusive access to back lots, sound stages and location shoots around town for their TV sections. These photos, which have not been seen in as many as sixty-five years when they first ran in the papers, provide rare glimpses of the earliest L.A. stations, the crews at work and the stars in action.

The exhibit runs from January 18 through July 15, 2018, along with a series of presentations given by television industry professionals and archivists.

 

Exhibit sponsored by Photo Friends, a nonprofit organization that supports the Los Angeles Public Library’s Photo Collection/History & Genealogy Department at Central Library.

Most Viewed Pages on Rosanne Welch for 2017

Most Viewed Pages on Rosanne Welch for 2017

Here are the Most Viewed Pages for 2017 on RosanneWelch.com

Did you miss any of them? Check them out now!

Rosanne Welch, Ph.D – A Writer’s Life
Women and Adapting The Godfather from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (1:01) – Rosanne Welch, Ph.D
From The Research Vault: Davy Jones of The Monkees: A towering multimedia star By Marco R. della Cava, USA TODAY | Rosanne Welch, Ph.D
A History of Screenwriting – 41 in a series – The Wind – Frances Marion – Rosanne Welch, Ph.D
From The Research Vault: Davy Jones of The Monkees: A towering multimedia star By Marco R. della Cava, USA TODAY – Rosanne Welch, Ph.D
Dr. Rosanne Welch’s Latest Essay Appears in “OUTSIDE IN MAKES IT SO: 174 New Perspectives on 174 Star Trek TNG Stories by 174 Writers” – Rosanne Welch, Ph.D
From The Research Vault: The Monkees’ FBI File via FBI Vault – Rosanne Welch, Ph.D
First (of hopefully many) royalty checks for “Why The Monkees Matter” | Rosanne Welch, Ph.D
Rosanne Welch – YouTube
First Look at our next book – Technical Innovation in American History: An Encyclopedia of Science and Technology – Rosanne Welch, Ph.D
Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 61 in a series – Laugh Tracks | Rosanne Welch, Ph.D

Now Available/Launch Party: America’s Forgotten Founding Father: A Novel Based on the Life of Filippo Mazzei by Rosanne Welch

Now available in print and Kindle Pre-Order from Amazon.com.

* See below for Launch Party Information

I’m deeply pleased to announce the publication of my novel America’s Forgotten Founding Father: A Novel Based on the Life of Filippo Mazzei as part of the Mentoris Series of books celebrating the Italian-American experience and foster an appreciation of history and culture. 

With all the hoopla surrounding Alexander Hamilton (thanks to Lin Manuel Miranda’s seminal musical), I was just as surprised to learn about this Italian-American patriot who owned the plantation next door to Thomas Jefferson – but chose not to own slaves.  Rather he worked at establishing a vineyard with the help of other Italian immigrants (whose children and grandchildren helped populate Virginia according to records kept at Monticello).  

Alongside Jefferson, Mazzei wrote articles in support of the Revolution and is now credited with coining the phrase “All Men are Created Equal”, which Jefferson found so inspiring he added it to his Declaration. As the Revolutionary War waged on, Jefferson and other Founding Fathers asked Mazzei to return to Europe and solicit funds, weapons and other support from the leading countries of Europe, which he gladly did, though it separated him from the beloved country he had adopted.  

Mazzei cover

Launch Party

If you’re in Los Angeles I invite you to join us as we toast the launch of this wonderful series of books. We’ll hear from publisher Robert Barbera, editor Ken Lazebnik and then I and Kate Fuglei (Fermi’s Gifts) will read short passages from our work.  

Thursday February 15th at 6pm
Italian Cultural Institute in Westwood
1023 Hilgard Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90024. (Map)

Parking on the street or in local lots.

This event is by Invite Only. Please RSVP by February 10, 2018 to rosanne@welchwrite.com

Print Edition | Kindle Edition
* Also available in Nook and Apple iBooks formats

His loyalty lasted a lifetime…

Surgeon, merchant, vintner, and writer Filippo Mazzei influenced American business, politics, and philosophy. Befriending Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, Mazzei was a strong liaison for others in Europe. Mazzei was Jefferson’s inspiration for the most famous line in the Declaration of Independence: “All men are created equal.”

Clearly, Mazzei had a gift of language and often used his words to share his ideas about religious freedom. Mazzei encouraged other Italians still living overseas to join him in a country rich with opportunity and promise. Often, when returning from Italy, he booked passages on ships for people who desired to travel to America and employed them on his estate—just to ensure a better, more fruitful life for everyone. During those travels, Mazzei found himself at the center of many fights for freedom.

He was truly a friend to freedom around the world.

The Journal of American Culture reviews “Why The Monkees Matter”

It was lovely to read another supportive review of Why The Monkees Matter – this one by Derham Groves writing for The Journal of American Culture. Happily, I had the pleasure of meeting with Derham when he was in Los Angeles for a conference. We shared a lovely dinner at the Hollywood/Highland complex while he told me the plans for a Monkees 50th anniversary of their concert tour of Australia at his home base, the Melbourne University library. If you live in Melbourne, check it out. — Rosanne

Jac americanjournalsmall 

The publication of Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television, and American Pop Culture by Rosanne Welch happily coincided with the fiftieth anniversary of The Monkees—both the TV show and the pop group. In response to casting calls in The Hol­lywood Reporter and Daily Variety in 1965, American performers Mike Nesmith (b. 1942), Peter Tork (b. 1942), and Micky Dolenz (b. 1945) and English per­former Davy Jones (1945-2012) were plucked from the 400 hopefuls who answered the ads to play the four members of a fictitious, struggling, garage band in a new teen comedy TV series, both to be called The Monkees. While Nesmith and Tork were unknown to the general public, Dolenz (as Mickey Braddock) had starred as “Corky” in the TV series Circus Boy (1956­1958), and Jones had played “The Artful Dodger” in the original Broadway production (1963) of the musi­cal Oliver! The Monkees TV series ran from 1966 to 1968, while The Monkees pop group broke up in 1971, then reformed again in 1989.

Many critics and historians who have discussed The Monkees in the past have focused mostly on the group’s music, whereas Welch focuses mostly on the TV series. However, it is almost impossible to separate one from the other. The way in which The Monkees was formed standard for the cast of a TV show but seen by many as “inauthentic” for the members of a band—casts doubts about the musicianship of Nesmith, Tork, Dolenz, and Jones (unfairly, both Welch and I agree). When The Monkees toured Aus­tralia in 1968 (I was twelve years old and remember it very well), a TV reporter in Brisbane impertinently asked Jones: “When do you think you might break up and try something like music?” Jones responded by throwing a glass of water in the reporter’s face, to which he retaliated by doing likewise to Jones. (The Canberra Times, 23 September 1968).

Welch was right not to get bogged down too much by the controversy over the merit of The Monkees’ music, which is surely “old hat” anyway. Firstly, at least three of the group’s hits  “I’m a Believer” (1966), “Last Train to Clarksville” (1966), and “Day­dream Believer” (1967)—are widely recognized nowa­days as “standards” of the era. Secondly, the two manifestations of The Monkees have both stood the test of time: the TV show has endured thanks initially to reruns, then to DVD, and now to YouTube; while the pop group’s three surviving members continue to perform into their seventies, most recently in 2016 to celebrate their fiftieth anniversary.

The four actor—musicians were hired to essentially play caricatures of themselves on The Monkees. This was underpinned by the decision to use their own given names on the show, that is, “Mike,” “Peter,” “Micky,” and “Davy.” As such, The Monkees were following a tradition established by some of America’s greatest comedians, including Jack Benny, Burns and Allen, Laurel and Hardy, Lucille Ball, and The Three Stooges. But The Beatles had the greatest effect on The Monkees. The English pop group influenced The Monkees’ zoomorphic name and the cute misspelling of “monkeys”; the group’s gender and size and partic­ular mix of personalities; and the group’s zany antics on the TV show, which were modeled on those of The Beatles in their hit films, A Hard Day’s Night (1964) and Help! (1965). Coincidentally, Davy Jones and the Broadway cast of Oliver! performed on The Ed Sulli­van Show on the same night in 1964 as The Beatles did. “I watched The Beatles from the side of the stage,” Jones recalled. “I saw the girls going crazy, and I said to myself, ‘This is it, I want a piece of that'” (Los Ange­les Times, 1 March 2012).

Each chapter of Why The Monkees Matter looks at a different aspect of the TV series, such as its contribu­tion to American counterculture in the 1960s; how feminism, gender, and sexuality were played out on the show; the role the scriptwriters played in making The Monkees a success; how the personalities of “Mike,” “Peter,” “Micky,” and “Davy” evolved over the course of the TV series’ two seasons and fifty-eight episodes and so on. But a constant theme throughout Welch’s book is metatextuality on The Monkees, that is, the two levels of dialogue that were going on one between the actor—musicians on the set and the other between the actor—musicians and the TV audience. While this was nothing new on television (Jack Benny and George Burns, mentioned above, both often inter­rupted the action to directly speak to or look at the TV audience), The Monkees introduced metatextuality to a new generation and, what is more, did it in fresh new ways, such as including outtakes at the end of the shows. While this is regularly done nowadays, it was rather “shocking” in 1966—and certainly very “hip.”

—Derham Groves, University of Melbourne


 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

    

 

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

America’s Never-ending Conversation About Race: Telecasting The Civil Rights Movement by Rosanne Welch, Written By, January 2018

America’s Never-ending Conversation About Race: Telecasting The Civil Rights Movement by Rosanne Welch
Written By Magazine, January 2018

I have an article about how the Civil Rights Movement was reflected on the TV shows of the 1960s and 70s – “America’s Neverending Conversation” in the current issue (January 2018) of Written By which is out today with revolving covers (like TV Guide does with special issues) featuring Lena Waite and/or Jordan Peele. 

I had the wonderful experience of interviewing Jim Brooks about Room 222, a show I watched incessantly in my childhood before I knew what an ‘ideology’ was and that I was being offered one – and I spoke at length with Nancy Miller at length about Any Day Now – a show that relished highlighting the brave men and women who worked in the Civil Rights Movement – and still do.

You can read the whole issue digitally at this link.

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By 1968, the Civil Rights Movement had celebrated many accomplishments, among them the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas ruling in 1954, the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955-1956, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Those milestones were discussed often on the evening news then and are common topics in history classrooms today.

Less common was mention of the movement or evidence of its existence on fictional television shows. While big movies such as Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? (1967, written by William Rose) appeared at the height of the movement, in many cases they were preaching to the choir since audiences had to choose to pay to see the films.

That left the small screen to bring the conversation about civil rights into American living rooms—in places where the message might not be wanted…often without warning. This made the exposure to the message that much more potent. Viewers could be confronted with issues they’d otherwise avoided in their daily lives. Unlike today, with social media’s virulent “fake news” and insular websites bolstering extremist interpretations, there was no sane way to deny documented reality other than turning off the set—then, as now, a difficult choice for most people.

 

Read the entire article — America’s Never-ending Conversation About Race: Telecasting The Civil Rights Movement by Rosanne Welch