A History of Screenwriting – 6 in a series – Baby’s Meal – Repas de Bebe (1895) – LOUIS LUMIERE

I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch


Baby’s Meal (1895) – LOUIS LUMIERE – Repas de Bebe

Baby's Meal (1895) - LOUIS LUMIERE - Repas de Bebe

Repas de Bébé (also known as Baby’s Meal and Feeding the Baby) is directed and produced by Louis Lumière and stars Andrée Lumière. The film consists of one shot of Auguste Lumière, his wife and baby daughter having breakfast in the countryside.

Learn more about the Lumiere Brothers with these books

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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 45 in a series – Native American Portrayals

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

Perhaps due to the attention drawn by the Red Power Movement during the run of The Monkees, Native Americans tended to fare better than Americans of Asian descent.  Perhaps the fact that Dolenz self-identified as part Native American on his mother’s side had an effect. Perhaps the writers were looking to move beyond the Tonto/Lone Ranger dynamic. Or perhaps the writers and actors found a connection between Native Americans and the emerging ideology of the hippie movement. 

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

Adapting Argo from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (1:06)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Adapting Argo from A History of the Art of Adaptation

 

Transcript:

Argo which, of course, won the Oscar just a couple of years ago is an example of some changes that were made that are regrettable and yet the movie holds up and it’s not Ben Affleck’s fault. When Ben Affleck went to make the movie, which won an Oscar for him, he knew that in the story, which is a true story, the actual CIA gentleman is named Tony Mendez. Tony Mendez and Affleck doesn’t look like a Tony Mendez. He wanted a Latino actor to be the lead in the film. he looked for someone that the studio would approve. The only Latino actor one considers to open a movie is Antonio Banderas and he’s booked, booked, booked. Because he’s the only Latino actor who can open a movie. So, the studio said to Affleck, “Look, why don’t you play the part?”

“But I’m not Latino. It’s going to erase the ethnic feeling of this movie.”

And they said, Ok, then we just won’t make the movie.”

He said, “Ok, as long as we keep the guy’s name. Maybe people will realize” and of course, if they look at the book they will understand that we’re talking about a Hispanic actor.

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

From The Research Vault: THE MONKEES – Clive James Talks Back interview (ITV), 4th March 1997

Yet another research resource for Why The Monkees Matter

THE MONKEES – Clive James Talks Back interview (ITV), 4th March 1997

From The Research Vault: THE MONKEES - Clive James Talks Back interview (ITV), 4th March 1997

This 1997 interview clip involves all four actor/musicians on the Clive James program out of the UK.  They discuss the Justus tour, their history, and the 30th anniversary special that aired that year.  James (or his editors) are  good at giving each their individual moment during the interview.  James defines the show as “their old but always new” series – which is a compliment and shows how James understood the show and its importance.  It’s always interesting to compare the questions asked by American interviewers and those from other countries. — Rosanne


Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

Order Your Copy Now!

Previously in Out of Research Vault:

A History of Screenwriting – 5 in a series – The Sprinkler Sprinkled (1895) – 1st Comedy Movie – LOUIS LUMIERE – L’Arroseur Arrose

I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch


The Sprinkler Sprinkled (1895) – 1st Comedy Movie – LOUIS LUMIERE – L’Arroseur Arrose

Lumiere sprinkler

The world’s 1st comedy, The Sprinkler Sprinkled (also known as L’Arroseur Arrosé and The Waterer Watered) was shot in Lyon in the spring of 1895. The film portrays a simple practical joke in which a gardener is tormented by a boy who steps on the hose that the gardener is using to water his plants, cutting off the water flow. When the gardener tilts the nozzle up to inspect it, the boy releases the hose, causing the water to spray him. The gardener is stunned and his hat is knocked off, but he soon catches on. A chase ensues, both on and off-screen (the camera never moves from its original position) until the gardener catches the boy and administers a spanking. Louis Lumière used his own gardener, François Clerc, to portray the gardener.

The first public screening of films at which admission was charged was held on December 28, 1895, at Salon Indien du Grand Café in Paris. This presentation by the Lumière brothers featured ten short movies, including L’arroseur arrosé, which played sixth. — Change Before Going Produtions

Learn more about the Lumiere Brothers with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 

Zor and Zam and The Monkees from 1960’s TV Censorship and The Monkees [Video] (1:00)

Watch this entire presentation

Zor and Zam and The Monkees from 1960's TV Censorship and The Monkees

 

“1960s TV Censorship and The Monkees” gives a brief overview of where censorship standards were in the era – and how The Monkees pushed the envelope with its mentions of the Vietnam War – and Sunset Strip riots – and even with the outrageous storytelling behind “Frodis Caper”, the episode that celebrated the saving of an alien plant that very closely resembled a marijuana plant…  

Writer Treva Silverman said the staff got away with such jokes because the network executives were just old enough not to understand any of the references.
Presented at Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting classes on Friday, August 5, 2016

Transcript:

In the course of this episode they do this song, which is hugely anti-war, if you look at it. Zoor and Zam.

“The king of Zor, he called for war
And the king of Zam, he answered.

Two little kings playing a game.
They gave a war and nobody came.”

That’s a hugely anti-war song to be in the middle of the still, fussing around kind of program. They got away with it. They got away with it. I’m not — I just find that fascinating. At the very end of the episode, they get to the bad plant. They’re going to kill it unti the plant says, “No, no, it’s not my fault. The other guy used me. I want to help the world. If I reenergize my Frodis power, more people will be happier. It will be a lovely thing.” This is the bad Wizard Glick and once he gets near the plant this is how he starts to feel. It’s an entire episode dedicated the love of marijuana. In 1967 in American television. I just love that.

 


Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

 

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition


About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 44 in a series – Asian Portrayals

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

The only positive representation of Asian culture came unexpectedly in the final episode, “Frodis Caper”, co-written by Dolenz and Dave Evans. As discussed in the chapter on counter-culture, a Buddhist chant known as the Lotus Sutra aided the band in escaping the evil Wizard Glick and saving the world. Therefore these all-American boys save the world with the help of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, a teaching from the first historical Budda, Siddhartha Gautama.

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

Adapting Sense and Sensibility from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (1:10)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Adapting Sense and Sensibility from A History of the Art of Adaptation

 

Transcript:

We all know that recently there’s been a whole run of Jane Austen. Suddenly the whole world loves Jane Austen again, which is fun. Recently — well not that recently — Sense and Sensibility ws turned into a movies. Hugely Successful. The best of this particular story ever. It was written by Emma Thompson, who some people forget is also a writer, not just an actress. She was hired because they wanted a writer who would retain the humor on Jane Austen. Many people don’t think she has humor. And in fact she does. So, Emma Thompson was a famous comedian at the time. It was long before she did any work in America with Kenneth Branaugh, so she was just know as a comedian in England. She took on the job — it took them about 5-6 years to get it made. What’s really interesting is that she kept a diary of the process of adapting it and the process of filming the adaptation, wherein continued changes were made on a daily basis on the set. So she documents changes — why they were made — who asked for them — whether she agreed of not — how that discussion took place. It’s a really excellent look at the full process of adapting something and it became quite a financial success. So, it was a pretty big adaption to note.    

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

From The Research Vault: Making Sense of Cultural Studies: Central Problems and Critical Debates by Chris Barker

Yet another research resource for Why The Monkees Matter

Making Sense of Cultural Studies: Central Problems and Critical Debates by Chris Barker

Find this book on Amazon.com

‘The book is an important read for persons who practice or study within the field. Anyone with experience or interest in the topic will come away with a deepened understanding of debates within cultural studies and with an array of nfew questions and ideas to pursue. The book would make a fine text for graduate level classes dealing with culture and media; the question/debate-orientated structure especially could provide the launching pad for a whole range of discussions, profjects, and papter topics’ — The Southern Communication Journal

In this sequel to the best-selling text Cultural Studies: Theory and Practice, Chris Barker turns his attention to the significance and future of the field. He analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of cultural studies, providing students and practitioners with an authoritative diagnosis of the subject and a balanced prognosis, and investigates the boundaries of cultural studies elucidating the main underlying themes of study.

Written with panache, and an understanding of classroom needs, Making Sense of Cultural Studies is the perfect teaching complement to Chris Barker’s earlier textbook. It is a rich resource for seminar work and undergraduate and postgraduate thesis topics, yet it can also be read as a free-standing analysis of the condition of cultural studies today.

 


Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

Order Your Copy Now!

Previously in Out of Research Vault:

A History of Screenwriting – 4 in a series – Exiting the Factory (La Sortie des Usines a Lyon) 1895 – Louis Lumiere

I teach several classes for the Stephens College Low-Residency MFA in Screenwriting, including History of Screenwriting. In fact, I created the curriculum for that course from scratch and customized it to this particular MFA in that it covers ‘Screenwriting’ (not directors) and even more specifically, the class has a female-centric focus.  As part History of Screenwriting I, the first course in the four-class series, we focus on the early women screenwriters of the silent film era  who male historians have, for the most part, quietly forgotten in their books. In this series, I share with you some of the screenwriters and films that should be part of any screenwriters education. I believe that in order  to become a great screenwriter, you need to understand the deep history of screenwriting and the amazing people who created the career. — Dr. Rosanne Welch


 Exiting the Factory (1895) – 1st Projected Film – LOUIS LUMIERE – La Sortie des Usines a Lyon

A History of Screenwriting  - 4 in a series - Exiting the Factory (La Sortie des Usines a Lyon) 1895 - Louis Lumiere

The 1st projected film, Workers Leaving The Lumière Factory in Lyon (also known as La Sortie des Usines Lumière à Lyon, Employees Leaving the Lumière Factory, and Exiting the Factory), was filmed by Louis Lumière using his Cinématographe, an all-in-one camera, which also serves as a film projector and developer. This film was shown in 1895 at the Grand Café on the Boulevard des Capucines in Paris, along with nine other short movies.

The film consists of a single scene in which workers leave the Lumiere factory. The workers are mostly female who exit the large building 25 rue St. Victor, Montplaisir on the outskirts of Lyon, France, as if they had just finished a day’s work.

Three separate versions of this film exist. There are a number of differences between these, for example the clothing style changes demonstrating the different seasons in which they were filmed. They are often referred to as the “one horse,” “two horses,” and “no horse” versions, in reference to a horse-drawn carriage that appears in the first two versions (pulled by one horse in the original and two horses in the first remake). — Change Before Going Produtions

Learn more about the Lumiere Brothers with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!