A Female Voice in the Room | Dr. Rosanne Welch | TEDxCPP [Video] (12:56)

I’m happy to announce that the TEDx talk I gave at TEDxCPP was chosen for posting to the main TEDx page on YouTube!

I want to thank the entire TEDxCPP team for all their hard work in preparing the event on our campus.

I hope all the women — and men — who watch it remember how important it is to listen to “the female voice in the room.”

A Female Voice in the Room | Rosanne Welch | TEDxCPP [Video] (12:56)

When people collaborate, there is a greater chance of success. Collaboration works best when there is diversity within the people. Making sure to speak up on behalf on your identities and make sure they are being represented is important.

Dr. Rosanne Welch teaches Humanities courses in the IGE Department at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; screenwriting in the California State University, Fullerton RTVF Department; and film history and screenwriting courses for the MFA in Screenwriting program of Stephens College.

Welch began her professional life as a television writer/producer on Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences and Touched by an Angel. In 1998 she researched, wrote and co-produced Bill Clinton and the Boys Nation Class of 1963 for ABC NEWS/Nightline. Welch has done presentations based on previously published works including a chapter in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television; an essay in Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology; and her forthcoming book Why The Monkees Matter (2016 McFarland Publishing).

In April she will publish the 4-volume Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection (ABC-CLIO) a project she co-edited with fellow Cal Poly Pomona Professor, Dr. Peg Lamphier.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Letter to the Editor, Los Angeles Times: On the Dylan Farrow story published May 12, 2016

NEW YORK CITY - DECEMBER 16: Rhodes Scholar and current Special Adviser to the Secretary of State for Global Youth, Ronan Farrow, poses on the steps of the New York City Public Library on December 16, 2011 in New York Cityy. (Photo by Ann Hermes / The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images)
NEW YORK CITY – DECEMBER 16: Rhodes Scholar and current Special Adviser to the Secretary of State for Global Youth, Ronan Farrow, poses on the steps of the New York City Public Library on December 16, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Ann Hermes / The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images)

After reading Ronan Farrow’s article about how the media sidelined his sister’s allegations about their famous father in order to maintain their connection to that director and his long list of associates, I engaged in several Facebook threads about the issue.  Since Facebook is world opened only to those we choose (preaching to the choir anyone?) it seemed useful to also send something to the Los Angeles Times to let them know I appreciated their publishing Ronan’s piece.

Thank you for putting Dylan Farrow’s story (by way of her brother’s public statements) on the front page of Calendar [“No Longer Hiding Behind Comedy: Ronan Farrow Fires at Media, Woody Allen,” May 12]. My only caveat is that I had to see yet another photo of the man not worthy of being called a “father”  above the fold. I wish you would have flipped the stories. — Rosanne Welch, Van Nuys

Note that I never mentioned the director by name – the parenthesized title of the original article is the only place it shows up – in order to keep the story focused on the female involved.  Of note also is that I once read how the Letters to the Editor section chooses which letters to submit based on a statistical coverage of the issue – so it 70% of letters are pro something, they’ll publish 7 letters pro and 3 letters representing the con.  So it was interesting to see 4 letters on this subject – 2 in favor of publishing Dylan’s story and 2 against.  It just shows how hard it is for women to come out about this subject to a world conditioned not to believe them.  In the first letter refuting my point the writer says none of the allegations were ever turned into charges – without noting that a judge insisted that the director be accompanied any time he visited his children post the break up with Mia Farrow and that Farrow herself chose not to follow through in court to avoid making her child repeat the devastating story over and over.

On the Los Angeles Times web site, my letter is the 7th letter down the this page

 

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 10 in a series

** Pre-Order “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Monkees quote 10

“Peter Tork often reminds interviewers that television was only sixteen years old when the show debuted, the age of the average audience members. All of this adds layers to the critical study of the program.”

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch — Coming Fall 2016 – Click for more info!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

Amazon Pre-Orders Now Available!

Adapting The Sound of Music Part 2 from A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! [Video] (1:07)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Adapting The Sound of Music Part 2 from A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

 

Transcript:

Right, I’m watching this movie and I’m thinking, “What happened to him? Did the Nazi’s kill him? I want to know.”, but the movie didn’t tell me. So, I went to the encyclopedia, because that is where I figured all the information of the world existed and I was like, what, nine or ten. So, I look in the encyclopedia and hi name doesn’t show up and I’m thinking, “Well, clearly he was a really important man. I should find out more about him.” So, then I had to turn back to read the book, because I hadn’t read it in a while. Only to discover that he didn’t even exist. This man wasn’t ever a human being. Their priest was the one who booked them at all the churches where they sang and became successful, but the movie writers and the playwrights didn’t think that audiences would understand that a priest could also function in that fashion. Right? They would not be able to split the character like that. So, they invented this crazy Max guy — very funny — who stuck with me. How interesting. He doesn’t even exist. So that’s when I realized, “Oh, when they take a book or a play and make a movie out of it, they don’t actually just copy what was already done. Oh.” That’s kind of annoying , but now it means I really have to focus on the actual piece of literature first.

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

Out of the Research Vault: What is it? It’s the Monkeemobile! – August Chronicle, November 7, 2014

Monkeemobile

For another fun find for the “Out of the Research Vault” series here’s an article from the November 2014 issue of the Augusta Chronicle.  The column is called “What is it?”  Staff writer Glynn Moore posted a portion of a photo and a hint and let readers send in answers.

This one was too easy for fans of the Monkees!  And served as a reminder of how many ways the show connected to fans long before the explosion of fandom that created today’s convention and cosplay event lifestyle.   As always, The Monkees lead the way!

What us it? – August Chronicle – November 7, 2014

Many of you knew right away that last week’s photo showed the Monkeemobile, the highly customized 1966 Pontiac GTO that many of us saw on television in the 1960s. The Monkees were put together to push the show, but the car was the real McCoy.

The Monkeemobile was a customized Pontiac GTO (actually, two versions were used in the 1966-68 series about the pop group), and was designed by Dean Jeffries. Despite heavy modifications, it was easy to tell the car as based on the 1966 Pontiac GTO.

Our clue last week was that the car “hey, hey, might have been comin’ to your town,” a reference to the theme song for the TV show.

Chosen randomly from the correct entries was the name Jeff Keevil, of Martinez, who wrote:
“One glance is all it took for me to recognize the Monkeemobile designed and built by Dean Jeffries for The Monkees television show. Yes, I used to watch that silly show. The car is some kind of very weird cross between a stretched-out 1966 Pontiac GTO convertible and I’m guessing something like a 1927 LaSalle Dual Cowl Phaeton.

“Although they never really appealed to me, these over-the-top severe customs seemed to be the ‘in’ thing in the mid-to late ’60s, many of them done by George Barris – think about the Munstermobile (Munster Koach), Grandpa Munster’s Drag-u-la, and the Batmobile. I guess since the Monkeemobile seems to be in the George Barris design style, he is often mistakenly given credit for this car.”

Thanks to Jeff Keevil for his entry. Other readers identifying the car were:

AUGUSTA: Tom Turner said: “The car in the photo is a 1967 Pontiac GTO, or was before being customized for The Monkees. Thanks for the hint or I never would’ve recognized the schnozzle.”
Lowell Fritsche said: “You have me thinking on this one. I have seen it but can’t place it. I think it is a car that Pontiac was looking at for one of its offering. Probably the early ’60s.”
Daryl Riley said the Monkeemobile was made from a 1966 Pontiac GTO: “Two GTOs, actually.”
Victor Loftiss wrote: “That’s the car of the TV pop group the Monkees, aka the Monkeemobile, which started out life as a GTO.

“I didn’t recognize it immediately until I read your clue. I remember The Monkees TV show, which often showed the car with them in it. I see that eBay has numerous models and small replicas of the Monkeemobile for sale; this was a really famous custom car. George Barris often got credit for the build, but Dean Jeffries was the guy who came up with it. Thanks.”

CANTON, GA.: David Anderson wrote: “As any 1960s music fan can tell you, this is the Monkeemobile, transportation of choice to one of rock ’n’ roll’s first manufactured groups, The Monkees. Through an agreement with the TV studio and Pontiac itself, two 1966 Pontiac GTOs were supplied to customizer Dean Jeffries, who, in less than month, transformed the cars into the Monkeemobile.

“The front sheet metal was lengthened to exaggerate the Pontiac nose, and the rear sheet metal was lengthened, too. The hood was reshaped to accommodate the supercharger and blower that were added to the engine, and the engine exhaust pipes exited through the front fender wells.

“The interior was modified with a second set of bucket seats where the rear seat once sat, and the trunk lid was removed so the trunk became part of the interior with a third-row bench seat. The only exterior glass on the car is a tall split windshield with window wings attached to the pillars. There is no back window and no side glass to roll up in case of rain. The top looks like something stolen from a 1920s or 1930s classic convertible phaeton.

“All in all, this is one unmistakable piece of automotive history, rock ’n’ roll history and Americana all rolled up into one vehicle. I love this car! I assembled the MPC model kit of this car as a child, and I now have another unassembled kit safely tucked away to assemble one day. This Christmas, I will probably also get the Hot Wheels 1:18-scale die-cast replica.

“My first car that I bought and paid for was a 1967 Pontiac LeMans, which only a keen eye can tell from a 1966 model. I then later had a 1971 Pontiac GTO, so I am kind of partial to this car for some very personal reasons. Oh, I also deviled my older sister back in the day because she was crazy about the Monkees, especially Davy Jones!

“The Monkees did not last as a group, but they were quite popular, outselling both The Beatles and the Rolling Stones. My sister’s beloved Davy Jones now calls rock ’n’ roll heaven his home, and the remaining members are probably all but unknown to today’s iTunes subscriber.

“The Monkeemobile and now several replica or tribute cars to that quartet live on proudly and can be seen on display at various locations across the country and several of the large car meets.

“By the way, George Barris did not have anything to do with the designing or building of the original cars. He did eventually acquire one of them, restore it and add some of his own personal design choices to it before selling it at auction for nearly $400,000! I am disappointed that he has never made any attempt to correct anyone that has credited him with the original design of these cars.”

EVANS: Paul Perdue wrote: “This week’s vehicle is a modified 1966 Pontiac GTO called the Monkee­mobile. Two of these cars were built for the Monkees, a musical group popular in the ’60s. One was the TV car used on The Monkees TV show, and the other was the show car that went out on tour with the group.”

Larry Heath wrote: “Hey, hey – it is the Monkeemobile! This was a customized auto designed to be used in conjunction with the TV show The Monkees. The show began in the fall of 1966 and was about four members of a band named the Monkees. The band was put together for the TV show but actually became popular and had numerous hit songs during this era.

“The vehicle was based on a 1966 GTO convertible. There were two of these vehicles built in 1966, and both were used on the show and for various promotional purposes. Both of the original vehicles are still around in the hands of private owners.”

David Kriegel said: “The car is a 1963-64 Pontiac GTO that was designed and built by Dean Jeffries for the TV show The Monkees – the Monkeemobile.”

HARLEM: Robert Powell said: “Hey hey, this week’s car is the Monkeemobile. It was designed by Dean Jeffries, starting with a 1966 Pontiac GTO.”

LOUISVILLE, GA.: Bob Holbert wrote: “The car is the Monkeemobile used by the musical group Monkees in the 1960s. Fire-engine red with a huge, supercharged engine, it was designed by George Barris, who was known for his outrageous auto designs. It is based on a 1965 Pontiac GTO, a car that was cool on its own merits.

“I owned the original 1964 model, which was nothing but raw power and gas-drinking speed. Great cars and the Monkeemobile did the GTO proud. Incidentally, great clue: ‘Coming to your town,’ part of the Monkees’ theme song.”

MARTINEZ: Cheryl Cook wrote: “Well, hey, hey, it’s the Monkeemobile! Aka a vintage 1966 Pontiac GTO. Originally designed by Dean Jeffries, it was given a little redesign by George Barris, of Barris Customs. He then sold it at a Scottsdale, Ariz., auction in 2008 to a true ‘Daydream Believer’ for $396,000. Barris autographed the dashboard for the sale.

“I’m a huge Monkees fan. My daddy loved to pick at me back then, telling me they didn’t play their instruments, couldn’t sing, not a real band, But he bought me my first Monkees album. You know, if it wasn’t Elvis or the Rat Pack, it was no good!”

NORTH AUGUSTA: Robby Crawford wrote: “Hey, that iconic nose is the Monkeemobile! Based on the 1966 Pontiac GTO and designed by Dean Jeffries. My dad had a 1967 and ’69 Goat (the affectionate name given to this car by its owners and fans). Quick story: My uncle and boss Cooper Cliatt had borrowed my dad’s ’67 to impress his date on Christmas Eve. To my understanding, that car served as Santa’s sleigh, because my Christmas gifts were in the trunk and Cooper’s date was running late that night. He showed up finally, to my mother’s relief, and Christmas was saved.

“This car is special to me for memories because I own a 1972 GTO now. Special thanks to my Uncle ‘Coop’ for taking the time to showing me your article every Friday morning; we both enjoy seeing these old cars.”
Robert Blake wrote: “You have had some difficult (for me) pictures the last few weeks, but I have got this one. It is the Monkeemobile.”

Paul Brewer wrote: “Though I recognized the car immediately, your hint certainly drove it home! It is the ’66 GTO Monkeemobile. Many people think George Barris built this car, but he didn’t. Dean Jeffries built the originals (there were two). I was a fan of the Monkees even though they were a band built specifically for the show. Michael Nesmith was a true innovator in many ways. I really liked his post-Monkees material.”

PERRY, FLA.: Larry Anderson wrote: “Here we come, walking down the street/We get the funniest looks from everyone we meet./Hey, hey, we’re the Monkees/And people say we monkey around/But we’re too busy singing/To put anybody down.
“Looks Like we have got a customized 1966 Pontiac GTO, better known as the Monkeemobile.”

SANDERSVILLE, GA.: Craig Hollings­worth wrote: “The clue made this one too easy. It is the Monkeemobile, which, according to Wikipedia, started as a 389 four-barrel 1966 GTO convertible. I had thought that it was a Barris creation, but it was not. Rather, it was made by MPC. There were actually two made, one for TV and the other for a traveling show car.

“I really look forward to your feature each Friday, although I usually am stumped.”

NO CITY LISTED: Gordon Adams wrote: “It’s the Monkeemobile. ‘Hey hey’ is all you had to say.”

Previously in Out of Research Vault:

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 9 in a series

** Pre-Order “Why The Monkees Matter” Today via Amazon.com **

Quotes from

“With The Monkees in particular what the writers intended is not always what the audience continues to read into each show. Amid all the slapstick and recycled vaudevillian bits there are deeper themes that spoke to teenagers then and speak now such as the idea that fame is not a desired goal, rather making a living as an artist is the desired goal.”

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch — Coming Fall 2016 – Click for more info!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

Amazon Pre-Orders Now Available!

Adapting The Sound of Music from A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! [Video] (1:13)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Adapting The Sound of Music from A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! [Video] (1:13)

 

Transcript:

So, how did I get interested in this? Well, look at that, when I was a kid this was a big book in the little kid’s library. The Trapp Family Singers, right, and everybody knows this book got turned into what?

Student: …the movie?

Welch: First, the play The Sound of Music. So, adaptations can come from books. They can come from theater. We’ll even see a cute little thing later on that’s like, ‘How did they do that?” So, first they took this true-life story. Often, obviously, an adaptation comes from a true-life story and they turned it into a theatrical event, a musical starring Mary Martin. Never got the chance to see that. I wasn’t born yet, but of course it turned into the movie that everybody in the world has seen a million times and you’ve gone to the Hollywood Bowl and you’ve done the sing-a-long and it’s become this popular culture thing. However, when I saw this movie as a kid, what struck me was — and everyone generally knows the story of The Sound of Music, right, I don’t have to go over it, but it’s the family that escapes when the Nazis take over Austria. At the end of the movie, their going to perform at a big cultural festival and it’s the night they escape instead and they’ve left their manager to say, “Here they are!” and they don’t show up and you know the Nazis are going to be very angry at this guy. So, I was very worried about they’re manager, Max Detweiler.

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

Why The Monkees Matter: Chapter 12: I’ll Be True To You: Fandom and The Monkees

Why The Monkees Matter: Chapter 12: I’ll Be True To You: Fandom and The Monkees

Why The Monkees Matter: Chapter 12: I’ll Be True To You: Fandom and The Monkees

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch — Coming Fall 2016 – Click for more info!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

Amazon Pre-Orders Now Available!

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 8 in a series

** Pre-Order “Why The Monkees Matter” Today via Amazon.com **

Monkees quote 08

“Studying The Monkees illustrates the history and evolution of the medium of television and provides a time capsule of American society at the burgeoning of the focus on youth culture that continued into the millennium generation”

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch — Coming Fall 2016 – Click for more info!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

Amazon Pre-Orders Now Available!

Introduction from A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! [Video] (1:05)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Introduction from A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!  

 

Transcript:

Thank you very much. It’s very cool to have this exhibit. It’s very exciting to think about the work of screenwriters as something that’s culturally of value to us. That obviously interests me, because that’s what I work on here at the university. So, I’m really excited to be talking about this and when you think about adaptations as I talked to Patricia I said “Well, we’re going to talk about a slew of different film adaptations across time. Why changes that were made were made. Of course, we’re going to talk about several, so we’re going to hit on them all a little bit. Then I have some stuff up front, if you want to look at them later. Obviously some books that have been turned into films as well as, recently, at the very end, we’ll talk about “The Martian” and a small, one of the small changes they made to that, which has a big, big, ripple effect and I think that’s a problem when people don’t look at the books first or, at least, afterwards. When I was a kid, you saw the movie and then you went to the library and got the book and that was how you got the rest of the story and I think that was really the plan and I hope that people today use movies in that way — to expand the information and the introduction to the book.

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube