Adapting “The Clansman” from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (1:05)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Adapting

 

Transcript:

I think one of the most interesting adaptations is a book we really don’t teach in film classes anymore and we shouldn’t because the content is awful. We don’t need this story anymore, but it’s an interesting demonstration in the power of adaptation. Of course, I’m talking about “The Clansman” which was written just the Civil War and has to do with the rise of the Ku Klux Klan and it makes the Ku Klux Klan the heros, which is frightening. I know eyebrow riffle there. How could that possibly be true. Well, obviously, a former Confederate, the children of Confederates would think of them as heros. So, this was a huge book and sadly one of the early, early directors who we all know, D. W. Griffith, was also in love with the Confederacy in the South. His grandfather has been in the Confederate Army, so he undertook to make the film, which was huge. It starts out being called, “The Clansman”, but we know it now more as “The Birth of a Nation.” Again, we used to teach it in film class because there’s a lot of new camera angeles and things that make it valuable, but we’ve come away from that because the content is just so controversial and so valueless that we don’t teach it in classes anymore. 

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 12 in a series

** Pre-Order “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

“Each actor in his own right was an authentic, mostly American teenager from various parts of the country; Nesmith (25) the too-young-married Texan; Tork (25) the Connecticut gentleman turned Greenwich Village folksinger; Dolenz (22) the Valley boy Cruise-Nighting Californian (later glamorized in 1973 in American Graffiti), and Jones (22), whose English childhood offered a throwback to the 19th century teenage life of apprenticeship, first to a racing stable and then to an agent.”

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch — Coming Fall 2016 – Click for more info!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

Amazon Pre-Orders Now Available!

Adapting “An American Tragedy” from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (1:37)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Adapting

 

Transcript:

Now in his career, his book “An American Tragedy” was made into a film twice. In 1931, Sternberg actually directed it and this is the book, but in 1951 it became, this “A Place in the Sun”, which was hugely famous both as an adaptation and as an Elizabeth Taylor movie with Montgomery Clift and Shelley Winters — long before she was a little old woman that everybody laughed at. And this was a marvelous story based in a true life event, then fictionalized for the novel and the novel further adapted into the film, because it dealt with some issues that we couldn’t talk about in film, even in the early 1950’s. Basically, Montgomery Clift’s character is a very poor young man who moves to the big city, gets a job with his distant cousin’s factory and he’s told you can’t date the factory workers. So he actually has a under—shhhhhh—nobody knows relationship with a woman who works with him and that’s Shelley Winters. Meanwhile, he’s getting to know his cousin’s very rich family that includes their neighbor, Elizabeth Taylor. And, of course, he falls in love with here, but no one’s ever going to get married because he’s the poor boy and she’s the rich girl. He starts getting promoted and making more money and they’re like – Aaaaah. Meanwhile, Shelley Winters, the girlfriend – gulp — you know what happens to her? She gets pregnant. And when she tells him it’s “Oh no, it’s going to ruin his life.” So he has to figure out what to do and the really scary sad thing, which comes from the true life story, is that he took her out on a row boat for a date and he killed her and dumped her in the river, because he wants to marry the rich girl, right? This was very, very controversial for back in the day, but they were able to get away it with. So Dreiser shouldn’t have worried about his work, because it transferred pretty well to the screen. 

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

Out of the Research Vault: Previously on CBS Sunday Morning: Davy Jones in 1993

In honor of the segment CBS Sunday Morning aired today with Micky, Peter and Mike, here’s an interview the show did with Davy in 1993.

Out of the Research Vault: Previously on CBS Sunday Morning: Davy Jones in 1993

Charming is the way he discusses each member’s personality, his pride to still be part of The Monkees and his memories of sitting on the beach during filming and eating their boxed sandwiches. Today on television and film shoots the craft services people dish out lobster and shrimp and all manner of luxury foods to actors and PAs alike.

This segment was part of a look back at what they called “TV Goodies” so not connected with any particular tour. Just a focus on the show – as I do in the book – since that is what started it all. it was fun to watch both segments as I spend my Memorial Day weekend copy-editing the proofs of the book which the publisher sent me this week. They want it to go to print by late June so I’d better get back to work!

Previously in Out of Research Vault:

How Star Wars Influenced Movie Themes, Female Characters, and Fandom with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (20:40)

How Star Wars Influenced Movie Themes, Female Characters, and Fandom with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch (http://RosanneWelch.com), Cal Poly Pomona Faculty from the Department of Interdisciplinary General Education discusses “How Star Wars Influenced Movie Themes, Female Characters, and Fandom” for Library Week 2016.

“The CalPoly University Library invited me to do a presentation for National Libraries Week on Star Wars so I packed up my paraphernalia box full of Stormtrooper helmets and light sabers and Lego creations to share with the community at CalPoly.  It gave me a chance to remind the audience that while George Lucas invented the universe, writers like Lawrence Kadan created the dialogue we still echo today – once again showing the importance of writers in the medium.”

How Star Wars Influenced Movie Themes, Female Characters, and Fandom with Dr. Rosanne Welch

 

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004. 

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel .  She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in  Fall 2016 
For more information, visit http://rosannewelch.com/monkees

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

Amazon Pre-Orders Now Available!

Dr. Welch’s other books and articles include, Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space and pieces for Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting.

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Subscribe to Dr. Welch on YouTube

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 11 in a series

** Pre-Order “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

“Depending on their family backgrounds, parents and teenage viewers of the late 1960s saw The Monkees existing on a plane anywhere between squeaky clean and troubled. Their squeaky-clean reputation came from their tame adventures, which were dictated by television standards and practices at the time.”

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch — Coming Fall 2016 – Click for more info!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

Amazon Pre-Orders Now Available!

Can Visuals Overwhelm The Words? from A History of the Art of Adaptation [Video] (0:59)

You Can Please Some of the People Some of the Time… None of the People All of the Time: A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More!

Dr. Rosanne Welch speaks on A History of the Art of Adaptation in Movies like Dune, The Godfather, Harry Potter and More! at the California State University, Fullerton Library

Part of the program series for Dune by Frank Herbert: A 50th Anniversary Celebration.

Watch this entire presentation

Can Visuals Overwhelm The Words? from A History of the Art of Adaptation

 

Transcript:

When I started to think about what to do here, I thought, “Well, what do writers have to say about adaptations.” And one of my favorite early American writers is Theodore Dreiser, who wrote a book called “An American Tragedy” and when they were discussing the idea — early days of film, obviously because we’re black and white, aren’t we — this is Josef von Sternberg and he was talking with Dreiser and this was his particular quote, “Literature cannot be transferred to the screen without loss of it’s values; the visual elements completely revalue the written words.” I don’t know that I believe that, but in the early days film, they weren’t sure. Was the visual going to overwhelm the words and actually, my joke is — I don’t have a slide for this, but, my joke is that one of my favorite adaptations of “A Christmas Carol” is the one The Muppets did, because in The Muppets version they let one of The Muppets read all the narration, which would normally never show up, because it’s not dialogue and so you hear Dickens’ words and you’re like “That’s so cool!” 

About this talk

Dr. Rosanne Welch (RTVF) speaks on the craft of history of film adaptations from the controversy of the silent film Birth of a Nation (protested by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1915) to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (to which author Truman Capote famously said, “The only thing left from the book is the title”) to The Godfather . Naturally, the behemoth in adaptation – Harry Potter (which depended on the relationship created by adapter Steve Kloves and author J.K. Rowling) will be discussed, as will the subject of this month’s celebration: Dune.

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

About Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch is a professor in the Low Residency MFA in Screenwriting Program from Stephens College, California State University, Fullerton, Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona.  In 2007, she graduated with her Ph.D. in 20th Century U.S./Film History from Claremont Graduate University.  She graduated with her M.A. in 20th Century United States History from California State University, Northridge in 2004.

Welch is also a television writer/producer with credits for Beverly Hills 90210 , CBS’s Emmy winning Picket Fences and Touched By An Angel . She also writes and hosts her own podcasts on 3rdPass.media, her first one titled “Mindful(I) Media with Dr. Rosanne Welch.”

Her upcoming book, “Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture” will be published in Fall 2016

Three Ring Circus: How Real Couples Balance Marriage, Work and Kids and The Encyclopedia of Women in Aviation and Space are two books she has written. Los Angeles Times and the Journal of Screenwriting hold some of her published articles.

Dr. Rosanne Welch Web Site and Blog

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter

Dr. Rosanne Welch on YouTube

A Female Voice in the Room | Dr. Rosanne Welch | TEDxCPP [Video] (12:56)

I’m happy to announce that the TEDx talk I gave at TEDxCPP was chosen for posting to the main TEDx page on YouTube!

I want to thank the entire TEDxCPP team for all their hard work in preparing the event on our campus.

I hope all the women — and men — who watch it remember how important it is to listen to “the female voice in the room.”

A Female Voice in the Room | Rosanne Welch | TEDxCPP [Video] (12:56)

When people collaborate, there is a greater chance of success. Collaboration works best when there is diversity within the people. Making sure to speak up on behalf on your identities and make sure they are being represented is important.

Dr. Rosanne Welch teaches Humanities courses in the IGE Department at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; screenwriting in the California State University, Fullerton RTVF Department; and film history and screenwriting courses for the MFA in Screenwriting program of Stephens College.

Welch began her professional life as a television writer/producer on Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences and Touched by an Angel. In 1998 she researched, wrote and co-produced Bill Clinton and the Boys Nation Class of 1963 for ABC NEWS/Nightline. Welch has done presentations based on previously published works including a chapter in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television; an essay in Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology; and her forthcoming book Why The Monkees Matter (2016 McFarland Publishing).

In April she will publish the 4-volume Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection (ABC-CLIO) a project she co-edited with fellow Cal Poly Pomona Professor, Dr. Peg Lamphier.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Letter to the Editor, Los Angeles Times: On the Dylan Farrow story published May 12, 2016

NEW YORK CITY - DECEMBER 16: Rhodes Scholar and current Special Adviser to the Secretary of State for Global Youth, Ronan Farrow, poses on the steps of the New York City Public Library on December 16, 2011 in New York Cityy. (Photo by Ann Hermes / The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images)
NEW YORK CITY – DECEMBER 16: Rhodes Scholar and current Special Adviser to the Secretary of State for Global Youth, Ronan Farrow, poses on the steps of the New York City Public Library on December 16, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Ann Hermes / The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images)

After reading Ronan Farrow’s article about how the media sidelined his sister’s allegations about their famous father in order to maintain their connection to that director and his long list of associates, I engaged in several Facebook threads about the issue.  Since Facebook is world opened only to those we choose (preaching to the choir anyone?) it seemed useful to also send something to the Los Angeles Times to let them know I appreciated their publishing Ronan’s piece.

Thank you for putting Dylan Farrow’s story (by way of her brother’s public statements) on the front page of Calendar [“No Longer Hiding Behind Comedy: Ronan Farrow Fires at Media, Woody Allen,” May 12]. My only caveat is that I had to see yet another photo of the man not worthy of being called a “father”  above the fold. I wish you would have flipped the stories. — Rosanne Welch, Van Nuys

Note that I never mentioned the director by name – the parenthesized title of the original article is the only place it shows up – in order to keep the story focused on the female involved.  Of note also is that I once read how the Letters to the Editor section chooses which letters to submit based on a statistical coverage of the issue – so it 70% of letters are pro something, they’ll publish 7 letters pro and 3 letters representing the con.  So it was interesting to see 4 letters on this subject – 2 in favor of publishing Dylan’s story and 2 against.  It just shows how hard it is for women to come out about this subject to a world conditioned not to believe them.  In the first letter refuting my point the writer says none of the allegations were ever turned into charges – without noting that a judge insisted that the director be accompanied any time he visited his children post the break up with Mia Farrow and that Farrow herself chose not to follow through in court to avoid making her child repeat the devastating story over and over.

On the Los Angeles Times web site, my letter is the 7th letter down the this page

 

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 10 in a series

** Pre-Order “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Monkees quote 10

“Peter Tork often reminds interviewers that television was only sixteen years old when the show debuted, the age of the average audience members. All of this adds layers to the critical study of the program.”

from Why The Monkees Mattered by Dr. Rosanne Welch — Coming Fall 2016 – Click for more info!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

  

Amazon Pre-Orders Now Available!