Audio: New Media Interchange: HBO, Silicon Valley and TwitchTV, Media fragmentation, Meerkat and Periscope and more!

New Media interchange, my new show with 3rd Pass Media, is now available on iTunes.

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New Media Interchange is a podcast spotlighting various developments in New Media & focusing on the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. Hosted by Douglas E. Welch , pioneer podcaster, blogger and new media consultant.


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Listen to HBO, Silicon Valley and TwitchTV, Media fragmentation, Meerkat and Periscope and more!


New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media Network which is launching a series of shows this week including Mindul(l) Media, The Render Break Report, New Media Interchange and More. You’ll find more information about 3rd Pass Media at http://3rdPass.Media.

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HBO, Silicon Valley and TwitchTV, Media fragmentation, Meerkat and Periscope and more!

This is New Media Interchange where we talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. I’m your host, Douglas E. Welch, pioneer podcaster, blogger and writer.

In today’ show…

  • HBO’s Silicon Valley takes their show directly to the gamer audience via TwitchTV,
  • Video Killed The Television Star: Why Total Fragmentation Is The New Norm
  • Meerkat and Periscope put live streaming in your hand

I’ll round out the show with a book review of video game storytelling and the next installment of my Subscribed series.

More after this…

Today’s show is brought to you by Audible.com. I love New Media like podcasting and YouTube, but I also love all types of books. If you love audio books you can support New Media Interchange and 3rdPass Media by starting your free 30-day trial with Audible today. Choose from over 100,000 books. Including one of my favorites, The Hobbit. Visit AudibleTrial.com/3rdpass or use the link in the show notes today.

SFX: Silicon Valley Trailer Clip

HBO’s Silicon Valley takes their show directly to the growing gamer audience via TwitchTV

A recent article in The Verge details how HBO is taking their newest comedy, Silicon Valley, directly to an existing audience that is probably predisposed to watch it — the viewers of Amazon’s TwitchTV streaming service that focuses on all types of gaming related content. These TwitchTV viewers likely already understand the joys of “cable-cutting” or freeing themselves from cable television subscriptions in lieu of “over-the-top services” like Twitch, YouTube, Netflix and now, HBO Now..

For me, this move makes a great deal of sense. Through Twitch, HBO can reach an audience that almost directly matches their desired audience. Through HBO, Twitch expands its programming beyond game play and into other aspects of their members’ lives. HBO also gets a chance to give Twitch users a taste of what they might be able to watch if they subscribe to HBO Now — content that was unavailable except via cable television until very recently. As The Verge article states, HBO is using “video games as a trojan horse” and getting their content in front of “roughly 100 million monthly active users” of Twitch. It is my bet that it will prove to be great promotion for everyone involved — HBO, Twitch and the users of both sites.

I imagine we’ll see more and more collaborations like this between all the players in what I call the “alternative TV” market. As the choice of content and services increases, discovery of exciting new content grows more difficult. Users can be overwhelmed with choice, but “giving them a taste” of content has always been a way to gather new viewers and it will continue to be important long into the future. Video content producers still need to find receptive audiences, as HBO has done here, but the opportunities for these collaborations in new and unique ways will continue to grow.

Video Killed The Television Star: Why Total Fragmentation Is The New Norm

All this collaboration, cross-over and cooperation between various content providers continues to push the fragmentation of the television and online video content market and David Armano over at the Logic+Emotion blog has written posts detailing exactly how this is happening and the trends he sees being created. First came DVRs, then YouTube, then other online video services signalled the end of television’s stranglehold on video entertainment. It gave consumers more choice over the type of content they wanted to view and provided the technology to time shift entertainment so viewers could watch what they wanted, when they wanted it. They didn’t need to rely on the curation and control that was wielded by mainstream media anymore.

Once the technology advanced to a certain degree — with relatively easy-to-access high speed Internet and software — content creators and providers immediately saw the opportunities it presented. Once content was available in significant quality and quantity, users quickly began to explore and enjoy the viewing options they had and — despite claims to the contrary — began cutting the cord more and more frequently.

For myself, I haven’t had a cable television subscription for several years now, opting to use broadcast to watch the few mainstream shows I do watch and a combination of YouTube, Netflix and other online video sources for the remainder of my viewing. Even though I am older than the target demographic for cord cutting, I have no problems leaving the “vast wasteland” of mainstream television behind, now that I have plentiful options. I can imagine that younger viewers, who tend be be a bit more tech savvy find it even easier to explore the myriad of options available. For me, the fragmentation of the industry is a welcome change and one I think will provide more unique and diverse content than ever before. There is a whole new entertainment world out there and I plan on taking great advantage of it.

While YouTube, Netflix and the other current “big boys” of online video content will continue to thrive in the coming years, even they are seeing competition and fragmentation in the form of live streaming sites like TwitchTV, and smartphone apps that put streaming in the hands of anyone with a smartphone.

SFX: Music Bed

…and that thought leads us into our last story for this episode…

Meerkat and Periscope put live streaming in your hand

In the last couple of weeks there has been an explosion in the mobile live streaming space with first the indie app, Meerkat, exploding to life during this year’s South by Southwest (SXSW) conference followed closely by recent Twitter acquisition, Periscope. Both of these apps all offer nearly one-touch live streaming from your smartphone or tablet and use Twitter as the main discovery and interaction source, with streams being announced immediately via Twitter and interactive chat messages, in the form of Tweets, overlaid right on the video stream. The release of these two services caused a veritable flood of live streams with everyone testing out the services and how they might be able to use them. Things have settled down considerably since launch, but I am still seeing quite a bit of activity in my Twitter stream.

For me, live streaming is a special use case. While I wouldn’t use it everyday, it can be dramatically useful during special events or breaking news stories to give immediate and alternative views a forum for the event. Other content creators thrive on live streaming. Both they and their audience love the immediate interaction via Twitter or chat room. it does indeed bring a much different feel to a show which is quite different from pre-recorded videos such as those on YouTube and elsewhere.

It will be a while before we see exactly where Meerkat, Periscope and other live streaming options fit into the overall online video market, but I think we can all be certain that we will see other, similar apps in the near future.

You can read more about Meerkat and Periscope in the articles linked in the show notes.

Is Meerkat winner-take-all?

Periscope, Twitter’s answer to Meerkat-style live streaming, is now available

The Race To Make Everyone A Livestreamer

Angry Joe and Nintendo

In a follow up on our story from last episode about Nintendo claiming copyright and advertising revenue from YouTubers who share their game play, it looks like the company finally forced one major YouTube personality, Joe ‘Angry Joe’ Vargas to give up on them entirely. Vargas boasts nearly 2 million subscribers on YouTube, a significant audience in the gaming space.

In a multi-part, self-titled “Rant” Vargas details how much money he has spent on Nintendo products and how much time he has spent sharing and promoting their devices and games and his extreme disappointment in the company’s YouTube policies. He has decided to totally drop the playing, recording and reviewing any of Nintendo’s devices and games rather than deal with constant copyright claims or joining Nintendo’s Creators Program which takes 40% of a YouTuber’s revenue for the right to post and share Nintendo games and doesn’t cover usage of all Nintendo games, only a portion.

You can find all of Angry Joe’s Nintendo rants, and all his other game reviews and game play videos on his YouTube Channel – AngryJoeShow.

YouTuber Angry Joe Swears Off Nintendo Videos After The Company Claimed His Mario Party 10 Take

Also in the news this week:

HBO Now Live on Apple TV

HBO’s over-the-top service HBO Now launched this week exclusively on Apple TV and Apple mobile devices for 3 months. Fans of Game of Thrones and other HBO shows can finally get them, legally, without a cable television subscription, for $15 a month.

Roku 3 Media Streaming Box adds new remote with with voice search

Along with Apple TV and Google Chromecast there are other streaming media players out there on the market, including the somewhat lesser known Roku 3. Press releases report the Roku has added a new remote to this device which allows you to do Voice Search to find shows over about 17 major apps, including Netflix, Amazon Instant Video, and Hulu Plus.

Pixar’s Renderman released for free

Now anyone with a powerful enough computer can use the same animation software used to create PIxar movies like Toy Story for their non-commercial projects. This follows on the release of various gaming engines like UnReal Engine 4 and Unity in free non-commercial use versions. And also better licensing options that allow independent game makers to use the software for free up to certain levels of earnings.

Links to all these stories are in the show notes

SFX: Music Bridge – “Theme for Harold (var. 3)” by Kevin MacLeod (http://Incompetch.com) under Creative Commons License

Book Review: Video Game Storytelling: What Every Developer Needs to Know about Narrative Techniques by Evan Skolnick

Check out the book on Amazon.com

At first glance, an outsider to the world of video games might see little relation between a major motion picture and a video game. They seem to be different genres, different worlds, even when movies crossover to become games and games crossover and are developed into movies — often badly. The action, the interactivity, the immersion of video games can make their stories seem unlike a standard narrative program. Surely, due to the player’s control of characters, video games can’t be written in the same way as a television script. While that might be true in some regards, when you go deeper into the creation of story that drives the final narrative, there are more similarities between writing for film and video games than you might imagine. These similarities also mean that many similar challenges exist for these writers regardless of their genre.

Writer Evan Skolnik is an international speaker and educator who conducts workshops on storytelling techniques and has worked on large scale video game projects such as Star Wars 1313, Marvel: Ultimate Alliance 2 and Spiderman 3.

The first half of Video Game Storytelling would be familiar to anyone who has ever taken a film writing course. It discusses the “three act structure”, “The Hero’s Journey” and the Monomyth that are the basis for many of our most classic books and films like Star Wars and Alien. Skolnick uses these well-known films to illustrate various writing concepts but then expands his examples with examples from well-known video games and how they also use these same techniques. These games include the Bioshock series, Uncharted and Metal Gear Solid. Thankfully, just as with movies, many scenes and playthroughs of these games are easily available via YouTube. This allows the reader to familiarize themselves with games they may have never played and fully understand the lessons Skolnick references.

While there is a good deal of video game examples spread throughout this first half, I found myself wishing for even more examples of how the traditional writing and storytelling rules applied to video games.

The second half of Video Game Storytelling details the many disciplines involved in creating a video game and how each of these affects — and is affected by — the narrative tools he has illustrated in the first half. For incipient video game developers this is where they will find the “meat” of the book and the majority of the author’s expertise. The information found in the first half might be found in any good book on screenwriting, but the detailed breakdown of all the video game development disciplines, their challenges and their relationship to the narrative of any video game should probably be required reading for anyone considering a career in video game design and development.

In the “In the Trenches” section, Skolnik details the responsibilities of each important discipline including Game Character Development, Level and Mission Development, Environments, Audio and several others. He also details how a video game writer needs to work with each of these disciplines in order to create a well-balanced, successful, and most importantly playable video game.

Throughout Video Game Storytelling you will see and hear a complaint common to any collaborative writing and creative enterprise — the lack of inclusion, if not outright respect, for the creator of the narrative of a game. There are several common mistakes in dealing with a writer, whether in traditional media such as television or film or the relativly younger video game industry. Skolnick lays out the biggest mistakes creative teams can make with their narrative experts i.e. writers. These mistakes can range from not hiring a writer at all for your game to hiring a writer but then not giving them the power and support to defend the narrative from the competing demands of all the disciplines mentioned above. Too often writers are given all the responsibility for the narrative, but very little power to defend that narrative. This can often translate into taking much of the blame for a less-than-successful game, even when many of the narrative decisions were taken out of their control.

Skolnik’s best advice when hiring a video game writer can be summed up as — hire as early as possible in the development process, integrate them fully and equally with all the other disciplines and teams, listen to their guidance about the narrative. A game developer is paying their writer for their experience, advice, and knowledge. They should then take it. Too often, though, that is not the case. The writer — and the narrative — get shunted aside by cool gaming mechanics, great explosions and intricate AI characters.

One of the main reasons I requested a review copy of the book from Blogging for Books is so I could better familiarize myself with game development and be able to discuss it more intelligently with my high school aged son, who is looking at a career somewhere in the game development industry. As I read the book, I found myself reading him some of the stories and ideas out loud and also encouraging him several times to read the book as soon as I had completed it. I think there is a great deal of knowledge to be gained from both sections of the book. The “Basic Training” section gives an excellent introduction into the world of the Three-Act Structure and the second half applies that knowledge in very concrete ways specific to video game development. It is a great starting point for learning about an industry — video gaming — that is rapidly becoming a huge entertainment industry on the level of traditional television or film.

SFX: Far Lands or Bust Opening Clip

Subscribed

Today in my Subscribed series is Far Lands or Bust. This series is where I highlight those Podcasts, blogs and YouTube Channels I subscribe to and watch regularly.

Years ago my son, Joseph, was just getting into online gaming and his introduction to that world was the now common gateway drug of Minecraft. In Minecraft and online in multi-user worlds he found a great collection of people. I was almost universally surprised and happy with the quality of folks he found there, which made me feel more comfortable with allowing him to play more video games as he grew up.

His interest also developed my own interest in Minecraft both as a player and viewer of Minecraft-related content. He shared his favorite YouTube personalities and their channels with me and they became — and remain — a significant part of my online video viewing. Far Lands or Bust and its creator, KurtJMac was one of my first subscriptions.

Far Lands or Bust is a series of Minecraft videos with a good cause. Like a virtual walkathon, Kurt is walking to the “Far Lands” of Minecraft and raising money for the Child’s Play charity. He has raised over $269,000 so far with his travels. The show is combination of various things. It’s a travelogue as he walks through his Minecraft world, a bit of a video blog, and as some people see it — an audio podcast with some pretty scenery. As he walk and has adventures in the Minecraft world, Kurt talks about gaming-related topics as well as his other interests including space exploration and astronomy.

Each season, Kurt hosts a marathon live stream as the culmination when he and the viewers reach their fundraising goal for Child’s Play. This brings in special guests, special live episodes of Far Lands or Bust, group gameplay in Minecraft and other games and, typically, a lot of fun and laughter.

Kurt also does a host of other video shows, some are Minecraft related but he also enjoys a variety of driving games and loves to check out quirky, artistic or just plain odd games from independent game publishers. You can find everything at FarlandsorBust.com or on his YouTube Channel KurtJMac. You’ll find links in the show notes.

Far Lands or Bust

KurtJMac on YouTube

SFX: Music Bed

That’s it for this episode of New Media Interchange where I talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more.

Some music written and produced by Kevin MacLeod at Incompetech.com and used under Creative Commons License by the author.

New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media network. For more information, visit 3rdPass.media. Do you have questions or comments? Send them along to NMI@3rdpass.media or via Twitter at @NMIPodcast .

I’m Douglas E. Welch and I’ll be back next week with more New Media news on New Media Interchange..

***

Audio: Find a niche for your podcast…or not from New Media Q&A 2015 with Douglas E. Welch

A clip from this longer presentation — New Media Q&A 2015 for UCLA Extension Voiceover Class. Watch the entire presentation here!

Douglas answers questions from students in Janet Wilcox’s online Voiceover class at UCLA Extension.

Listen to this clip

 

Transcript:

Should a podcast be narrowly focused or can it benefit from having varied content? Well, as I am often fond of saying — and frustrating the heck out of people — yes. Your podcast can, and should be, niche focused. Perhaps you talk about voiceover or comics or gardening — like I do — or careers or technology or whatever. Gaming is another big, big podcast niche right now. If you’re really interest in that, sure, focus very, very narrowly on that niche. Now, that said, you’re going to find some podcasts out there which have much more akin (in common) to the “morning zoo” show like you’d hear on terrestrial radio these days — the 2 DJs making jokes, having fun and playing music in-between, maybe interviewing some people and often those shows will range quite widely.

Links mentioned in this video:

Voiceover: Techniques and Tactics for Success by Janet Wilcox

 iTunes Podcast Directory

Free Blogging Sites
http://Wordpress.com
http://Blogger.com

Royalty Free Music
Kevin MacLeod – http://incompetech.com

Amazon Affiliate Program

Audible.com

Far Lands of Bust

KurtJMac Patreon Page

Rob Paulson and Talking Toons

More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Audio: New Media Interchange: Nintendo and Youtubers, Netflix to spend $5B on programming, Best time to post your videos and more!

New Media Interchange is a podcast spotlighting various developments in New Media & focusing on the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. Hosted by Douglas E. Welch , pioneer podcaster, blogger and new media consultant.


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Listen to Nintendo and Youtubers, Netflix to spend $5B on programming, Best time to post your videos  and more!


New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media Network which is launching a series of shows this week including Mindul(l) Media, The Render Break Report, New Media Interchange and More. You’ll find more information about 3rd Pass Media at http://3rdPass.Media.

#rd Pass Media Logo


Nintendo and Youtubers, Netflix to spend $5B on programming, Best time to post your videos  and more!

This is New Media Interchange where we talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. I’m Douglas E. Welch, pioneer podcaster, blogger and writer.

In today’ show…

Nintendo wants a piece of that YouTube Money and plans on taking it out of the pockets of Let’s Play video makers, Netflix plans on spending over $5 billion on programming in 2016, and Tubefilter explains the best times to post your YouTube videos for maximum impact.

Will round out the show with some words about “Attracting Attention to Yourself” and end up with the first entry in my Subscribed series, highlighting the podcasts, blogs and YouTube Channels I am subscribed to.

More after this…

Today’s show is brought to you by Audible.com. I love New Media like podcasting and YouTube, but I also love all types of books. If you love audio books you can support New Media Interchange and 3rdPass Media by starting your free 30-day trial with Audible today. Choose from over 100,000 books. Including one of my favorites, The Hobbit..

Visit AudibleTrial.com/3rdpass or use the link in the show notes today. 


Gaming is the #2 category on YouTube, behind music, and you can find a wide variety of gaming reviews, recaps and a growing number of Let’s Play video series, where a gamer walks you through their experience of game from beginning to end. Some of these Let’s Play series can go on for 30 or 40 episodes as the gamer hacks and slashes their way through the zombies of Dying Light, works to save the fictional country of Kyrat from a crazed dictator or performs speed runs of amazing dexterity in Zelda or Mario Brothers. While many game manufacturers have a good relationship with Let’s Play producers — even providing them explicit license to play the game on video — the aged “big boy” of the gaming world — Nintendo hasn’t been playing nice of late.

Back in mid-2013, Nintendo starting claiming all YouTube revenue from many videos that included Nintendo Copyrighted content, like Let’s Play footage. They eventually backed off this wholesale money grab and last month created a “licensing” program that allows YouTube producers to continue sharing YouTube videos of Nintendo games in exchange for 30%-40% of the revenue according to articles from Game Informer. com.

While this certainly is a better deal than taking 100% of the revenue, I always look suspiciously at large companies taking money away from some of their biggest fans — turning off many of these fans from ever playing or sharing a company’s products in the future. Is this a sign that Nintendo is struggling overall and looking for a quick way to gain a quick cash boost? The company has been struggling of late, but I think trying to level out their balance sheet on the backs of fans might not be the way to do it.

What do you think? Are YouTuber’s getting a free ride on Nintendo gaming content? Is Nintendo making a desperate money grab? What does this mean for the thousands of hours of Nintendo gaming already available on YouTube and its creators? I’d love to know what you think. Send along a comment on the blog or via Twitter to @NMIPodcast.

Read More
Nintendo Updates Their Bad YouTube Policies By Making Them Worse


In our next story, courtesy of Business Insider, Netflix will spend $5 billion on programming in 2016…

Netflix will spend $5 billion on programming in 2016, more than everyone but ESPN, says Janney

I often comment to people how I am amazed to took so long for large, Internet companies like Netflix, Google and Amazon to get into content creation for their services. Living here in Hollywood itself, I have seen the production companies — those entities that do the actual nitty-gritty work producing a television show — don’t really care who pays the bills, as long as there is money to be made. I knew it was only a matter of time before they started to see services like Netflix, Google Play and Amazon as potential partners in content creation.

Therefore I see no surprise at all that Netflix is going to be spending even more in the future creating exclusive content. With critically acclaimed series like House of Cards, I think they can see a great potential for content beyond the traditional, mainstream, broadcast networks. I would expect to see even more players enter this market, both in the existing ranks of high-tech businesses as well as new startups focused on becoming the next, great, content network.

You can read the complete story using the link in the show notes.

 


 

Finally, for all you incipient content creators out there, TubeFilter provides a detailed article on the best days and times to post your videos for maximum viewership. If you are looking to turn your content into an on-going moneymaker, information like this can be critical. Moving the number of views 5% upwards could result in a significant boost in advertising earnings. As a fairly casual producer of YouTube content myself, I tend to post videos whenever I have time and whenever they are complete. After reading this article, though, I think I am going to spend a bit more time and consideration on my video release schedule. All the detailed tables and charts are available in the TubeFilter link in the show notes.

Want To Know The Best Days And Times To Post YouTube Videos? Here’s A Yearly Calendar.


Attracting Attention Yourself!

Ever since I first heard George Carlin’s comedy album, Class Clown, a certain phrase has always stuck with me… (paraphrasing) The job of a class clown is…ATTRACTING ATTENTION TO YOURSELF! I call this “Carlin’s Law of Attraction!” Replace class clown with any other profession and you will see the universal truth of that statement. Replace class clown with “podcaster” and you can probably see where I am headed.

Podcasting offers anyone the ability to “attract attention to yourself”, your business, your cause, whatever is important to you. Sure, it can be difficult to rise above all the other folks who have already discovered podcasting, but the odds are certainly much better than they ever were in the traditional media.

Carlin’s Law of Attraction, also dictates that you want your media spread as far and wide as possible. This means posting your videos to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and any other spots where your audience might stumble across them. That said, each piece MUST have some links driving people back to your home site where they can subscribe to your content directly.

Everything depends on your ability to attract attention to your content. Scripts and books don’t sell themselves in your drawer (or trapped in your computer), art does sell when it sits in a closet and your podcast doesn’t attract an audience if no one ever gets to see it.

Apply Carlin’s Law of Attraction to everything you do, podcasting, writing, office work, whatever, and you will find that things just start to happen for you.


That’s it for this episode of New Media Interchange where I talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more.

New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media network. For more information, visit 3rdPass.media. Do you have questions or comments? Send them along to NMI@3rdpass.media or via Twitter at @NMIPodcast .

I’m Douglas E. Welch and I’ll be back next week with more New Media news on New Media Interchange..

Audio: Podcasting as niche media vs. mass media from New Media Q&A 2015 with Douglas E. Welch

A clip from this longer presentation — New Media Q&A 2015 for UCLA Extension Voiceover Class. Watch the entire presentation here!

Douglas answers questions from students in Janet Wilcox’s online Voiceover class at UCLA Extension.

Listen to this clip

 

Transcript:

I want to caution you, though. Podcasting is not what we might consider a mass media. It’s a niche media. Your audience is not going to be 8 million people like it would be for NCIS on CSBS on Tuesday night, but it could be 1, 2, 4, 10,000 rabid, raving fans of your work who will support you and assist you and basically give you some great feedback about the work you’re doing as well as, perhaps, supporting you financially, through a Patreon fundraiser or through affiliate income — and we’ll talk about that a little but later. So, get the word out in any way you can.

Links mentioned in this video:

Voiceover: Techniques and Tactics for Success by Janet Wilcox

 iTunes Podcast Directory

Free Blogging Sites
http://Wordpress.com
http://Blogger.com

Royalty Free Music
Kevin MacLeod – http://incompetech.com

Amazon Affiliate Program

Audible.com

Far Lands of Bust

KurtJMac Patreon Page

Rob Paulson and Talking Toons

More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Tech: Chhirp app sends/embeds 12 second audio clips via Twitter

I came across Chhirp today via this post on The Next Web, Chhirp for iOS lets you post 12-second voice clips directly to Twitter.

 

chhirp-logo

As with most new apps, you can never be sure exactly where it will fit into the ecosystem until people actually start to use it. This leads me to try out a lot of new apps, just to see what they can do.

My first Chhirp

Audio: How to promote your podcast from New Media Q&A 2015 with Douglas E. Welch

A clip from this longer presentation — New Media Q&A 2015 for UCLA Extension Voiceover Class. Watch the entire presentation here!

Douglas answers questions from students in Janet Wilcox’s online Voiceover class at UCLA Extension.

Listen to this clip

Transcript:

Now, what Janet does for these online courses is she solicits questions from her students and emails them over to me and that’s what I have here on my handy. dandy phone. And so, we’re just going to jump in to some of the questions. First questions was, once you start podcasting, what are the ways to promote them? — to promote podcasts? Well, the fact is, podcasts are best promoted, of course, online. Because ou can link people right over to whatever show you’ve created. You can also share your podcasts via all your different social media accounts — whether it’s Facebook, or Twitter or Tumblr or whatever social media network is your home base. Now, it’s important to remember, too, that YouTube is a social network in itself, so don’t forget, that even if you’re just doing voiceover work it might be helpful to do a video, even if it’s just a static picture and put that up on YouTube as well to gain the benefit of that social media network, too. Of course, for podcasts, one of the biggest places you want to be these days is in the iTunes Podcast Directory.  That’s very simple to do. You only need to set up a blog — which you can do for free at WordPress.com or Blogger.com or a variety of other sources — and then you submit that blog to the iTunes Podcast Directory. It will see the shows you’ve put there, slurp them up and suddenly you’re now in the iTunes Podcast Directory, categorized and searchable by anyone who might be interested in whatever you’re talking about. 

Links mentioned in this video:

Voiceover: Techniques and Tactics for Success by Janet Wilcox

 iTunes Podcast Directory

Free Blogging Sites
http://Wordpress.com
http://Blogger.com

Royalty Free Music
Kevin MacLeod – http://incompetech.com

Amazon Affiliate Program

Audible.com

Far Lands of Bust

KurtJMac Patreon Page

Rob Paulson and Talking Toons

More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Audio: Create Your Own New Media Projects from New Media Q&A 2015 with Douglas E. Welch

A clip from this longer presentation — New Media Q&A 2015 for UCLA Extension Voiceover Class. Watch the entire presentation here!

Douglas answers questions from students in Janet Wilcox’s online Voiceover class at UCLA Extension.

Listen to this clip

Transcript:

Imagine — in the past — when you had to go through a television network or a radio station or a music company or a music producer to get your creativity seen and heard. Today, you can take your creativity from the very beginning and share it with the world. That’s what podcasting, new media, YouTube, and all that is all about. Sharing what you do and how well you do it. Now, I can’t stress enough the need for you to do your own projects. Especially in the entertainment industry. We became convinced over the the years that the only way to have an entertainment career was to have an agent and a manager and a variety of all these people doing things for you. Promotion people and so on and so forth. The fact is, today, it’s much more your own career and a lot of the responsibility for your career falls on you. Yeah, I know, it’s a lot of work and it can be tough at times, but the fact is, no one can care about your career as much as you do. So, why shouldn’t you be the one doing the blogging, the video-ing, the podcasting, the recording of your own music, whatever.

Links mentioned in this video:

Voiceover: Techniques and Tactics for Success by Janet Wilcox

 iTunes Podcast Directory

Free Blogging Sites
http://Wordpress.com
http://Blogger.com

Royalty Free Music
Kevin MacLeod – http://incompetech.com

Amazon Affiliate Program

Audible.com

Far Lands of Bust

KurtJMac Patreon Page

Rob Paulson and Talking Toons

More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Audio: Showing “What You Do and How Well You Do It” from New Media Q&A 2015 with Douglas E. Welch

A clip from this longer presentation — New Media Q&A 2015 for UCLA Extension Voiceover Class. Watch the entire presentation here!

Douglas answers questions from students in Janet Wilcox’s online Voiceover class at UCLA Extension.

Listen to this audio clip

Links mentioned in this video:

Voiceover: Techniques and Tactics for Success by Janet Wilcox

 iTunes Podcast Directory

Free Blogging Sites
http://Wordpress.com
http://Blogger.com

Royalty Free Music
Kevin MacLeod – http://incompetech.com

Amazon Affiliate Program

Audible.com

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Rob Paulson and Talking Toons

More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Subscribed 54: Music from Kevin MacLeod for all your New Media projects

Originally published as part of the “Subscribed” series on my New Media blog and podcast, Careers in New Media


Incompetech

If you have listened to or watched any of my podcasts or YouTube videos then you have heard a lot of Kevin MacLeod’s music. In fact, if you watch anything on YouTube, chances are you have heard it, too. Kevin is one of the foremost providers of music tracks for YouTube publishers around the world. I first discovered his work via the Minecraft Let’s Play videos that I watched and quickly adopted him as my own music provider.

Listen to one one of his latest tracks

Kevin provides all his music, for free, under a Creative Commons license — but he wouldn’t be adverse to a few dollars either. (SMILE) I sent him a lump sum payment myself to thank him for his creativity and music and help ensure that more tracks keep coming. Kevin also does composing on commission for video games, stage musicals and film.

You can subscribe to Kevin’s latest music release in a number of ways. First, he posts all new tracks to his blog at Incompetech.com 

Kevin also recently wrote a great blog post on selecting music for your book trailer — Book Trailer 101 — which has some great advice.

Incompetech blog

As you can see here, Kevin also has a presence on Soundcloud and YouTube. You can also subscribe to these channels to hear all his latest releases.

What are some of your favorite Subscriptions? Share them here in the comments!


Previously highlighted on Subscribed:

Subscribed is a Careers in New Media series highlighting the Podcasts, YouTube Channels, and Blogs that I follow on a daily basis. Check out this entry, and past entries, for some great New Media Content — Douglas

Audio: Douglas talks Podcasting on The Struggling Entrepreneur Podcast

se-logo-square

Last week I sat down with Frank Castaneda of the Struggling Entrepreneur to talk podcasting, being a pioneer podcaster and more. It’s always great to talk about podcasting, especially the exciting early days.

 Listen to the entire interview(~45 mins)

Baby Boomer Douglas E. Welch of the very first podcasters in the podosphere (since September, 2004) was also one of the very first New Media content producers who standardized in (1) repurposing content from a written column or blog: and (2) using screencasts to provide additional value to all 6 of his early podcast shows; and (3) taking a lead in organizing virtual events in the Bar-Camp style of un-conferences.

Douglas had his first podcast, Career Opportunities, and then added 5 more shows to become a prolific podcaster in multiple genres — from business, careers, gardening, finance, and high-tech discussions.

His current podcasts are available for subscription at www.DouglasEWelch.com.

His background is creative and not conventional — he was a THEATER major in college, but he was successful as an Entrepreneur for many years with his freelance computer-and-LAN installation-and-support business.

As you will hear in this audio episode, crawling under tables and desks to install or unclog the coils of cable that grow in IT locations was something less than desirable. So he decided to go into helping others with counsel, advice, public speaking, presentations and consulting for New Media, including screencasting, podcasting, video, blogging and other New Media areas. In addition, he is the author of 5 published books on amazon.com and other publishers.

Audio: Loneliness – End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 28/30

Audio: Trolls - End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch - Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 - 16/30

Loneliness – End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 26/30

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End of the day Logo

There is a distinct difference between loneliness and solitude, I think. I always think of solitude as a chosen state. I go in search of solitude and quiet and relaxation sometimes so I can return, refreshed, to my work and other efforts towards a better life. Loneliness, though, is an enforced state for the most part. You are faced with loneliness when life, work, or circumstances prevents the time, location or desire to engage with others. Loneliness is often something we feel is chosen for us, not that we choose ourselves. We feel loneliness when our wants, needs and desires aren’t being fulfilled, not matter how much we would like them to be.

In today’s busy, busy, world, I think much loneliness comes from the constant movement, striving and desire that we all face. Even when we might feel like we don’t want to be lonely, we allow life to push us around, distract us from those desires in search of fulfillment elsewhere. When this happens to me, I can recognize it by the emptiness I feel. No matter what I might accomplish in any other realm of my life, if I am feeling lonely nothing can fill that hole. It aches there like a deep muscular pain, clouds my mind and distracts me further and further from other goals. Given enough loneliness, I descend into unproductivity in all aspects of my life. Dishes go unwashed. The garden goes unweeded. The cruft of life starts to build up around me. I risk becoming the dirty hermit living in a cave if I let it continue.

Mt. Wilson - Angeles National Forest - 20

Alone on the trail

The main problem is solving this loneliness, though, is that many other people are feeling and acting the same way. We are all looking for a better life, but that search can lead us astray from some fundamental needs in our lives. When enough of us do this, the cumulative effect isn’t additive (1+1=2) rather the destruction is exponential (10^10= 10,000,000,000) When enough of us are feeling lonely, we fly further and further apart — becoming lonelier both individually and collectively until something breaks in a drastic fashion.

It can be difficult when others don’t recognize your loneliness — and the need to break the cycle, both for you and themselves. Loneliness can easily turn to anger, resentment and recriminations, especially in long term relationships. As the old saying goes, “Familiarity breeds contempt” and we can slowly learn to ignore the wants, needs and desires of those closest to us — and they can do the same to us. It takes an open mind and open heart to prevent loneliness from turning to contempt, but as we often see, it can happen much more quickly and much more easily that we might expect.

Facing deep loneliness yourself? Even in the depths of loneliness you must remember that it is up to you to solve it. If your current community isn’t satisfying your needs for companionship, look elsewhere. Look far afield. Look close to home, but look. We are all fighting our own battles and others may be so involved that they no longer have time for you. Don’t hate them, but don’t wait for them either. They may eventually come out of their own loneliness, but they also may not. You can’t decide that for them, though. You can only face your own battle with loneliness as best you can and move on.

More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Previously in the Dog Days of Podcasting 2014:

What is the Dog Days of Podcasting?

“Essentially, it is a challenge to do a podcast for 30 days in a row.

In 2012 Kreg Steppe was looking to give himself a little push in regards to recording his own personal podcast since he wasn’t recording it very often. That turned into a challenge for himself to record a show everyday for 30 days believing that after 30 days it would turn into a habit. Once it was mentioned to Chuck Tomasi he took the challenge too and they decided it would be a great idea to record starting 30 days before Dragon*Con, culminating with the last episode where they would record it together when they saw each other there.”

Audio: Self Doubt – – End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 26/30

Audio: Trolls - End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch - Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 - 16/30

Self Doubt – – End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 26/30

Listen to this podcast

It always amazes me how one word or small phrase can change my mood from one extreme to another in the passing of a single breath. It happened today, over something small, but one response to something I said sent me into a fit of self-doubt that still lingers even as I write this. Self-doubt is my enemy right now, even more than usual, so it doesn’t take much to trigger it and all the associated responses. As is often the case, no one is tougher on us than ourselves and this is especially true of me. I only need a small shove to head down the path.

I have always been — what might be called — a sensitive person. I don’t think it has ever served me well. I quickly pick up on the moods and attitudes of those around me and begin to feel them, even if I don’t have any particular association with what is happening. Being near someone having an argument or complaining about something is enough to send me out of a coffeehouse or restaurant just to escape the feelings that start to take over. Call it excessive empathy or sensitivity or “having no sense of humor” or “can’t take a joke”, as I have often been accused.

Of course, trying to explain this to others is a futile exercise. It is very hard to understand something like this from the outside. Heck, I barely understand it myself. I only know what I feel and how I react to specific situations, but others often think I am just being silly, or capricious or have some ulterior motive. More likely, I just want to remove myself from the situation or do whatever I can to prevent being in the situation in the first place. It is like I see a train coming own the tracks and I step off the tracks long before everyone else, just to be safe.

Often my trigger points are the verbalization of doubts and fears I am already feeling deeply myself. This suddenly wrenches my thinking back to the problem when I am not prepared to deal with it. Sometimes ignoring a problem is the only way of dealing with it at the moment. Sure, that is not a long term solution, but I know I don’t always have the strength to deal with every issue all the time. I try to make things better when I can, but I also know when it is better to do as Scarlett O’Hara did and “think about it tomorrow.” The trouble with this is that others don’t know when I am capable of dealing with an issue and when I am not, so they only do what they can do and talk about it, or try to solve it. This typically only sends me further down the rabbit hole, though. I am getting better at telling people what is going on within this weird head of mine, but it can still be difficult, especially when I am surprised with a word or turn of phrase that touches that sore spot that no one can really see.

There are days I want to wear a sign that says “It’s not you, it me!”, just so people know that I truly am “not in my right mind” (SMILE) at least in the frame of mind to deal with the larger issues of life and legacy.

More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Previously in the Dog Days of Podcasting 2014:

What is the Dog Days of Podcasting?

“Essentially, it is a challenge to do a podcast for 30 days in a row.

In 2012 Kreg Steppe was looking to give himself a little push in regards to recording his own personal podcast since he wasn’t recording it very often. That turned into a challenge for himself to record a show everyday for 30 days believing that after 30 days it would turn into a habit. Once it was mentioned to Chuck Tomasi he took the challenge too and they decided it would be a great idea to record starting 30 days before Dragon*Con, culminating with the last episode where they would record it together when they saw each other there.”

Audio: Improvisation – End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 23/30

Audio: Trolls - End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch - Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 - 16/30

Improvisation – End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 23/30

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There are times I wish I had the precision of NASA as I launch into my week each Monday. I make lots of check lists and plans, but life is never something that respects plans greatly. There are too many unknowns in life to allow too much planning, so we come up with a few scenarios, a few goals and hope that circumstances go along with those plans.

As you might imagine, while circumstances and our plans sometimes match up, it is much more common for life to fly apart, go chaotic and make us improvise perhaps a bit more than we might like. This can be very stressful depending on the cause of the chaos and the results, but without these improvisational moments life would certainly be a lot more dull. We might not enjoy it much when we are in the middle of a crisis but in many cases it can make our life better — if we let it.

Playing music with Lorilyn

Life chaos requires the ability to let go of trying to control what you cannot and make the best of what you given. Fear and our own arrogance can often cause us to flail about and fight against what is happening, even if would be better for everyone involved to go with the flow. The ability to recognize chaotic moments and ride them out with style is definitely one trait you should look to cultivate. I can guarantee that it will do more good than all the authoritarian bluster you can manage.

Plan your life and your actions,of course, but then treat each day like a Jazz tune where all the musicians follow a basic track, but then are encouraged and challenged to make their own song in and around the basic framework the songwriter created. Life is often nothing but improvisation, so the more you cultivate it, the better off you will be.

More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Previously in the Dog Days of Podcasting 2014:

What is the Dog Days of Podcasting?

“Essentially, it is a challenge to do a podcast for 30 days in a row.

In 2012 Kreg Steppe was looking to give himself a little push in regards to recording his own personal podcast since he wasn’t recording it very often. That turned into a challenge for himself to record a show everyday for 30 days believing that after 30 days it would turn into a habit. Once it was mentioned to Chuck Tomasi he took the challenge too and they decided it would be a great idea to record starting 30 days before Dragon*Con, culminating with the last episode where they would record it together when they saw each other there.”

Audio: Carmello and the Water Jars by Douglas E. Welch – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 21/30

Carmello and the Water Jars by Douglas E. Welch

Audio: Carmello and the Water Jars by Douglas E. Welch - Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 - 21/30

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Carmello and the Water Jars
By Douglas E. Welch

Carmello lived and worked as a potter in the little village of Agira on the big island of Sicily.

The village sat high on a rocky mountain. All the water for drinking and cooking had to be gathered from springs in the valley far below. The villagers would place the water in large jars strapped to the backs of their donkeys and then walk back up the mountain to their homes.

It was a hot, dry summer. Many of the springs had stopped running. People needed more water but t here were not enough jars to hold all the water they needed.

The village leaders came to Carmello’s workshop.

“Carmello, we need more water jars or we will surely die of thirst,” said the villagers.
“Surely, I cannot make so many water jars in time,” said Carmello. “We would need hundreds to bring water to every house. I don’t think I can help you. We may all have to leave Agira and live in the valley closer to the springs.”

No one wanted to leave Agira. They loved their little village.

The Villagers begged, “Please Carmello, please, please try to help us. Our families have lived in Agira for thousands of years. We can’t leave now. It would break our hearts.”

Carmello knew there was no way he could make enough water jars before the village ran out of water completely. Even so, Carmello decided to try. He knew he must help his fellow villagers in any way he could. They had helped him so many times in the past.

“Bring me as much clay as you can and what little water is left, ” said Carmello. “I will start this minute. We have so little time left.”

The villagers gathered all the remaining water and brought it to Carmello’s shop. Men went to the valley to dig clay and bring it back up the mountain. The men worked hard, not drinking from their water jugs so that Carmello could use it for his work.

Inside the cool darkness of Carmello’s workshop the villagers could hear the spinning of his potter’s wheel and the slap of his hands against the clay.

Carmello worked all day. He worked as the sun went down. The villagers could still hear Carmello working as they lie in their beds that night. They villagers could not sleep. If Carmello couldn’t make enough water jars they would all have to leave their homes and the village they loved.

Carmello worked very hard. His hands hurt badly as he shaped each jar. The sweat fell from his face and became part of each jar he created. Carmello was so tired. He felt he could not go on much longer. He slowly raised his head from his work. On a shelf in the workshop Carmello’s eyes fell upon a statue of San Fillipo; a statue he had made with his own hands.

“Oh, San Filippo, you have always protected our village in the past. Please, please show me the way!”

Carmello, tired as he was, set to work once more. He started spinning his potter’s wheel once again.

As the morning sun rose over the village of Agira many townspeople made their way to Carmello’s workshop. Many had not slept at all that night. They tossed and turned in their beds fearing that they would have to leave Agira forever.

The scene outside Carmello’s shop caused everyone to stop and stare. No one could believe what they were seeing. All around Carmello’s workshop where stacked hundreds and hundreds of water jars, more than enough for everyone in town. They were so many jars that the villagers couldn’t get near the workshop itself.

Even more strange was the fact that each water jar bore a picture of San Filippo.

“How could Carmello have done all this work and still decorated them so beautifully,” wondered Marcello?

“There was not enough clay and water to make all these jars,” said Daniella.

Eventually, the villagers shook off there wonderment as they realized there was still much more work to be done. The jars had to be strapped to their donkeys, walked down to the valley, filled with water and then returned to each home.

The men started to carry the jars to their donkey, but they nearly dropped the jars in their amazement.

“The jars are full of water, ” shouted several men at once! The villagers cheered with joy at such good news.

“I don’t know how Carmello accomplished this amazing feat, ” said the Mayor, “but I shall congratulate him myself as soon as we can clear a path to his door.”

All the villagers, men, women and children began carrying water jars to their homes and shops, praising Carmello’s work with every step. After an hour or more a path was finally cleared to the door of Carmello’s workshop.

“Carmello,” the men cried! “Come out and receive our deep gratitude!” Carmello did not reply.

“Perhaps he is asleep after his hard labor,” said Serafino. “So much work would tire a hundred men.”

Not wanting to wake Carmello, the men opened the workshop door slowly and quietly. It took a moment for their eyes to adjust to the darkness. Carmello was no where to be found. The men looked throughout the small workshop. They checked in Carmello’s small house nearby. They even checked in the surrounding fields and hills.

The only sign of Carmello was the statue of San Filippo, the one Carmello himself had made. The statue sat on the stool next to the potter’s wheel. Carmello’s shirt was draped around the statue’s shoulders.


More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Previously in the Dog Days of Podcasting 2014:

What is the Dog Days of Podcasting?

“Essentially, it is a challenge to do a podcast for 30 days in a row.

In 2012 Kreg Steppe was looking to give himself a little push in regards to recording his own personal podcast since he wasn’t recording it very often. That turned into a challenge for himself to record a show everyday for 30 days believing that after 30 days it would turn into a habit. Once it was mentioned to Chuck Tomasi he took the challenge too and they decided it would be a great idea to record starting 30 days before Dragon*Con, culminating with the last episode where they would record it together when they saw each other there.”

Audio: Share your work philosophy — from the Career Opportunities Podcast – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 19/30

Career Opportunities Logo 2012

As I have often said in past columns and speaking engagements, telling people “what you do and how well you do it” is of the utmost importance in any career today. Even so, we can all have difficulty in finding ways to share this message with those around us. You might wonder what you can and should be saying about your work and career. In an effort to move you forward in promoting your own work, here are a few example methods for sharing your work and gaining larger benefits from your skills and knowledge.


Midsummer Book Sale — All My Kindle Books 99¢ each for the next 30 Days!
Ends August 24, 2014

Read the Kindle book using your Kindle, Computer or Mobile device!
  

Now available exclusively to Career Opportunities readers and Listeners.

Click for more information and pricing 


First, while you may not realize it, each of us has our own personal philosophy about our work and career. We have lessons we have learned, skills we have developed and stories to tell. You don’t have to be some famous business writer with a best selling book to start sharing your philosophy, though. Even those writers had to start somewhere. They had to learn a lot about business in order to get where they are today, developing their philosophy as they went. You should be be doing that, too.

Start collecting the stories of your life and work that illustrate your beliefs and philosophy about work, business, personal interactions, teamwork, whatever most draws your attention. Make a point of writing notes when you come across a particularly useful, intelligent or life changing thought. If you don’t capture them as they happen, they will quickly disappear. Then, more importantly, start sharing these thoughts with your family, friends and coworkers. What is their response to your ideas? Was it useful to them, too? What changes or new thoughts come to mind when you discuss your ideas with them? How can you grow a small idea into something larger?

These small actions are the beginnings of your overall life philosophy. I know, philosophy might feel like a overly dramatic word for your ideas, but trust me, it isn’t. Your ideas have power far beyond what you might believe at first. They can change both you and the world around you. Don’t dismiss them out of hand. Think of your ideas as a philosophy and you will start to feel just how important they are. You will also begin to internalize your own philosophy, reinforce what it means to you and use it grow in your own life and career. In this way, you become a living example of your philosophy and your life becomes a story that you can share with others in hopes of improving their lives, too.

Next, start sharing your philosophy with a larger audience. You don’t have to stand on a street corner proclaiming your philosophy, but you certainly want to be sharing it with your co-workers, managers, online via a blog, discussion group or video series. Find concrete examples of how you can apply your philosophy to the issues of your family, your office, your business sector or the world at large. Not only will this help others who are struggling with the same issues as you, ift will force you to think more deeply about your philosophy and how it might grow and change to better meet your needs and the needs of those around you. Each expansion or refinement to your philosophy brings more and more benefit as you develop more ways of having a positive impact on their world around you.

For the next week or so, I want you to focus on your philosophy? What rules have you developed in your work over the years? What methods? What skills? What do you believe deeply about your work, your profession, your society, your world? What stories shaped those beliefs? What were the direct learning experiences that brought about your philosophy? What can others learn from your experience? How can you best share it with those who might need it most?

Now, in preparation for sharing your philosophy with others, why don’t you share it with me. Tell me some of your great career and life stories that shaped your philosophy. Share your ideas for creating a better life and career for yourself and what others can learn from it. I believe we all have something important that we have learned, developed or created. We are all an expert in something. If you have one more idea or one more experience than someone else, they want and need your expertise. Actively reach out and share your expertise with those who want and need it most. Not only will you help them. You’ll also be helping to to build the career you deserve.

***

Audio: Trolls – End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 16/30

Audio: Trolls - End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch - Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 - 16/30

Trolls – End of the Day with Douglas E. Welch – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 16/30

Listen to this podcast

Troll n Internet slang, a troll is a person who sows discord on the Internet by starting arguments or upsetting people, by posting inflammatory, extraneous, or off-topic messages in an online community, either accidentally or with the deliberate intent of provoking readers into an emotional response — Wikipedia

One grows weary of trolls. I don’t mean just those found on the Internet, either, although they are the most discussed these days. Trolls are to be found everywhere — online and offline. Tragic and dramatic events bring them out in droves and it is more and more difficult to avoid them. Their posts and comments litter your Facebook and Twitter feeds and their words float, unwanted across your local coffee shop or bar.

Trolls are the way they are for some reason, even if I cannot define it. They must receive some internal reward from their trolling behaviors. They must revel in the responses their words receive, but as someone who does not believe in such behaviors, I have no frame of reference to understand it. I only see the results — the animosity they trail behind them. This often makes me think of Shelley’s Poem, Ozymandias. “Look upon my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”

Despair is exactly what I feel when I see trolls and their “works”. Are trolls really more common now or do they just have better distribution? I think a bit of both. There is a pettiness and a meanness throughout society these days. Some find it much too easy to judge, to slight, to punish those around them — sometimes for the slightest or most non-existent reasons. They take joy, glee even, in making others lives just a bit more difficult, a bit more troubled, a bit less happy.

Let us reject these trolls wherever we see them. Let us reduce the effect they have by showing clearly the flaws and animosity of their efforts. Let us not reward trolls for their behavior, but rather cause them suffer consequences for their anti-social and arrogant acts. Let us hold others to higher standards and not let them lower everyone’s standards to their level.

We are all to blame in some small way for allowing trolls the power they take. We laugh alongside them. We silently enjoy the havoc they bring and the pain they cause. Instead, let us turn away from trolls and make it very clear that we do not approve. We do not commiserate with them. We do not tacitly support them. Let us shun them and instead turn to making the world — or even just our small part of it — perhaps just a little bit better.

Remember, “The Only Thing Necessary for the Triumph of Evil is that Good Men Do Nothing.” Do something or we are all sure to be buried beneath a mountain of trolls.

More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Previously in the Dog Days of Podcasting 2014:

What is the Dog Days of Podcasting?

“Essentially, it is a challenge to do a podcast for 30 days in a row.

In 2012 Kreg Steppe was looking to give himself a little push in regards to recording his own personal podcast since he wasn’t recording it very often. That turned into a challenge for himself to record a show everyday for 30 days believing that after 30 days it would turn into a habit. Once it was mentioned to Chuck Tomasi he took the challenge too and they decided it would be a great idea to record starting 30 days before Dragon*Con, culminating with the last episode where they would record it together when they saw each other there.”

Make it clearer, not more confusing — from the Career Opportunities Podcast – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 12/30

Career Opportunities Logo 2012

As someone who has spent their life working to support, train and educate people, I have learned again and again how important it is to be able to explain difficult concepts quickly and clearly. A good explanation can help everyone involved leap forward in their understanding and productivity. There are few tools as powerful as a good explanation to help people work to their highest potential, but there is a bit of an art to creating and delivering great explanations and answers to tough questions. Here are a few guidelines I have developed over the years to help me be better at explaining and always work towards making concepts and ideas clearer, not more confusing.


Midsummer Book Sale — All My Kindle Books 99¢ each for the next 30 Days!
Ends August 24, 2014

Read the Kindle book using your Kindle, Computer or Mobile device!
  

Now available exclusively to Career Opportunities readers and Listeners.

Click for more information and pricing 


Know it all, then distill

In order to explain something clearly, you need to have knowledge that is both wide and deep. You need to understand every aspect of a task or problem, so you can determine what works best in any given situation. Unfortunately, this extensive knowledge is often your greatest impediment to explaining the concept or task to others. Since we know so much about the topic, we can be eager to share all that knowledge with others. Of course, those around us often don’t need (or want) that much detail. They need a basic understanding of the issue and a few good ways of dealing with that issue. When you try to unload every fact, figure and concept on them, they quickly “fill up” and tune out.

Instead, once you have gained your deep understanding, your next step is to distill that knowledge down to its very essence. Knowing what you now know, what are the most important facts that need to be shared? What advice, tips, rules, procedures can be developed that anyone — even without your deep knowledge — can use to be more productive, accurate, effective, whatever? It can be difficult to distill large amounts of knowledge down, but it is so critical. Your expertise comes not only from deep knowledge. If you can’t share it effectively, it is almost worse than not having the knowledge at all. Knowledge that can’t be share is wasted time, potential and productivity.

Less, then more

Always start with less information when communicating. Like the pyramid method taught in journalism school, start with most important piece of information first, then the next, then the next. Make sure that your listener clearly understands what you are saying at each point before moving on. Also, learn to recognize when they have enough information. Some may need only the basics while other may need, or desire, more detailed information to both better understand the issue themselves and be better able to explain to others. Each person is different. Each role is different. You’ll have to watch carefully for what each person needs from you and seek to provide that. Remember, the communication isn’t about you and your knowledge. It is about your listener’s wants and needs.

Use your listener’s language

When you are extremely knowledgeable about a topic, it is easy to fall into using the specific technical language of that topic when speaking to others. Don’t. Use the language of your listener so that they understand you best. Remember the last time you visited your doctor or dentist and they started talking about Maxillary lateral incisors and third metatarsels. Did you really understand them or just nod your head? I know I find myself stopping them and asking for simpler explanations all the time. Don’t be like them. While it may be important they they know and use their own very specific vocabulary, speaking in the patients own language greatly speeds and facilitates understanding.

Speak in your listener’s language. Use metaphors and examples from their life and work. If they are an artist, speak in artist’s terms of composition, balance and design. If they are a lawyer, you’ll need to be able to use basic and correct legal terminology to get your point across. If they work in finance, then financial metaphors and examples are your best tool. Don’t think that you can dazzle people with the brilliance of your own specialized vocabulary and language. They will simply stop listening. Trust me, I have explained the difference between RAM and Hard drive space more times than you can count and still the best metaphor I can use is that of the desktop and a file cabinet. I can talk bits, bytes and kilobytes until I am out of breath, but all they will hear is blah, blah,blah.

No matter how complex, technical or difficult an issue, always seek to make it clearer, not more confusing. Better knowledge, better quality and better productivity only comes from a clear understanding of an issue. If your explanation only adds to the confusion surrounding it, you are making your life — and the lives of those around you — much more difficult. Gain wide and deep knowledge. Distill that knowledge down to its essence and then communicate that essence using the language of your listener. This is just one more way to build the career you deserve and the careers of those around you.

***

Video: First Impression: Ocenaudio Recorder and Editor – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 10/30

Part of the Dog Days of Podcasting

Video: First Impression: Ocenaudio Recorder and Editor - Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 - 10/30

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More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Previously in the Dog Days of Podcasting 2014:

What is the Dog Days of Podcasting?

“Essentially, it is a challenge to do a podcast for 30 days in a row.

In 2012 Kreg Steppe was looking to give himself a little push in regards to recording his own personal podcast since he wasn’t recording it very often. That turned into a challenge for himself to record a show everyday for 30 days believing that after 30 days it would turn into a habit. Once it was mentioned to Chuck Tomasi he took the challenge too and they decided it would be a great idea to record starting 30 days before Dragon*Con, culminating with the last episode where they would record it together when they saw each other there.”

Audio: Your Garden – Inch-by-Inch from A Gardener’s Notebook – Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 8/30

Audio: Your Garden - Inch-by-Inch from A Gardener's Notebook - Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 - 8/30

Your Garden – Inch-by-Inch from A Gardener’s Notebook

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Often we look at our gardens plant by plant – worrying over which is doing well, which is doing poorly, which one needs to be moved.  At other times, we try to take in the big picture.  We map, we plan and try to create one seamless whole.  There are times, though, when inch-by-inch is the way we see it, and it brings a unique viewpoint.

The Edging

Recently we started a new edging project in the garden.  Beginning with the smallest rose bed, we decided to use old wine and other glass water bottles to surround the bed.  Previously we had used limbs from tree pruning, but these were now several years old and had deteriorated almost completely.  I did a bit of research online, including looking for images of bottle edging, to make sure we wanted to proceed.  It certainly seemed worth a try.  The pictures looked attractive and it didn’t seem like a lot of work. We would do this small bed first and then decide if we wanted to continue it in others.

Of course, doing an edging project like this means getting “down and dirty” with your garden – usually on your hands and knees.  You notice immediately how the soil differs from inside the bed to the hard, compacted soil of the surrounding paths.  You get a clear view of the quality of the soil in the beds as you dig the trench alongside. You notice insects – good and bad – weeds, and maybe even the rust that is forming on the lower leaves of the roses that you hadn’t noticed before.  Oh, oh, are those aphids?!?  Ah, but then you also notice the ladybug larvae and adults ready to eat them up.

Your garden takes on a different meaning on this micro scale.  You don’t notice the thistles and bindweed as much, but the blackspot and Japanese beetles really catch your eye.  You don’t notice the bad pruning on the box hedges, yet the quality of the soil as it sits in your hand makes you sit in wonder for just a moment.

A project for you  

If all this sounds very foreign to you, I am going to charge you with a project the next time you are in your garden.  Take a 1-meter-square area of your garden and mark it off in some way.  Use a piece of rope or string to outline the area. If you have seen archaeologists working in movies or on TV, think about what their digs look like — a series of neat squares marching across the landscape so they can catalog their finds. While this 1 meter can be a patch of lawn, consider placing it over the junction between a bed and the lawn.  You’ll get better results in your experiment.

Now that you have marked out the area, sit down – better yet, lie down on your belly – and start to take note of every living thing you see there.  First off you’ll see the grass, the daylilies, the small weeds.  Then look deeper.  You’ll see ants, aphids, beetles and a host of other insects.  Keep looking.  Dig down and turn the soil over a little or pull up a piece of turf. Now there are worms, spiders, sow bugs, spider mites and more. I can guarantee you that you will notice more than you ever thought possible in your small 1 meter area and all of it is there, teeming with life, all day long, every day.

I know that, for me, observing my garden in this macroscopic way brings a deeper appreciation and deeper understanding of my garden when I look out from my back door each morning, coffee cup in hand.  I never see just the paths and the plants anymore. In my mind I see it all – everything that exists down there among the roots, as well as everything on the surface. This also leads me to think differently about what I might do in my garden — what I might add, what I might remove, what I might want to change. It is quite amazing how a small garden project can lead you down the merry path of deep thoughts, but, then again, isn’t that one major reason we garden in the first place?

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A chat in the garden — Dog Days of Podcasting 2014 – 7/30

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Come and join me in the garden while I talk of new media consulting, YouTube and more. Strictly an old school, talking podcast today. Off the cuff. Stream of conscience. No editing. Just me, the Zoom H2 and a cooling beverage in the garden.

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Previously in the Dog Days of Podcasting 2014:

What is the Dog Days of Podcasting?

“Essentially, it is a challenge to do a podcast for 30 days in a row.

In 2012 Kreg Steppe was looking to give himself a little push in regards to recording his own personal podcast since he wasn’t recording it very often. That turned into a challenge for himself to record a show everyday for 30 days believing that after 30 days it would turn into a habit. Once it was mentioned to Chuck Tomasi he took the challenge too and they decided it would be a great idea to record starting 30 days before Dragon*Con, culminating with the last episode where they would record it together when they saw each other there.”