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Posts Tagged ‘recipe’

Coronavirus Kitchen: Risotto Milanese

March 23rd, 2020 Comments off

Sunday night was the night for Risotto all milanese (Saffron Risotto in the Style of Milan). This is one of our “Recipes in Rotation” that we make about once a month. Rosanne had spent Saturday making stock and we often use it to make risotto and soup. The recipe is below. It is quite tasty. You can serve it with your favorite vegetables like asparagus, spinach, cauliflower, broccoli and more. 

Recipe Below

Sweating the onions

The first stock goes in

Adding some of the saffron steeped in the warm stock

Ready to eat


Risotto alla milanese RISOTTO, MILAN STYLE

For 6 persons 1 quart Homemade Meat Broth (page 10) OR 1 cup canned chicken broth mixed with 3 cups of water
2 tablespoons diced beef marrow, pancetta, or prosciutto
2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots or yellow onion
5 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 cups raw Italian Arborio rice
1/3 teaspoon powdered saffron OR 1/2 teaspoon chopped whole saffron, dissolved in 1 1/2 cups hot broth or water
Salt, if necessary
Freshly ground pepper, about 4 twists of the mill or more to taste cup
freshly grated Parmesan cheese

1. Bring the broth to a slow, steady simmer.

2. In a heavy-bottomed casserole, over medium-high heat, saute the beef marrow and shallots in 3 tablespoons of the butter and all the oil. As soon as the shallots become translucent, add the rice and stir until it is well coated. Saute lightly for a few moments and then add 1/2 cup of the simmering broth, about a ladleful. Proceed accord-ing to the basic directions for making risotto (page 180), adding a ladleful of hot broth as the rice dries out, and stirring it very frequently to prevent it from sticking. After 15 minutes add half the dissolved saffron. When the rice has dried out, add the rest of the saffron. ( The later you add the saffron, the stronger the taste and aroma of saffron will be at the end. Herbs that call too much attention to themselves are a rude intrusion upon the general harmony of a dish, but if you like a stronger saffron presence wait another 5 to 8 minutes before adding the diluted saffron. But be careful it doesn’t upstage your risotto.) When the saffron liquid has been absorbed, finish cooking the risotto with hot broth. (If you run out of broth, add water.)

3. When the rice is done, tender but al dente, firm to the bite, taste for salt. ( If the broth was salty, you might not need any. Con-sider, too, the saltiness of the cheese you will be adding.) Add a few twists of pepper to taste, and turn off the heat. Add 2 tablespoons of butter and all the cheese and mix thoroughly. Spoon into a hot platter and serve with a bowl of freshly grated cheese on the side.

MENU SUGGESTIONS Risotto Milan Style is traditionally served with Braised Veal Shanks, Milan Style ( page 256), one of the rare instances when a first course is served together with the meat course in an Italian menu. It is a well-justified exception, because the two dishes are an ideal complement to each other. This risotto can also be served as a regular first course when the second course is a roasted or braised meat or fowl.

Coronavirus Kitchen – One Pot Chicken Marsala

March 21st, 2020 Comments off

Tonight’s dinner was my own ”cheater” version of chicken marsala – one of Rosanne’s favorite dishes.

My version is a bit of a hodgepodge without a recipe but here my take.

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tbls Olive Oil
  • 2 tsp corn starch
  • 1 lb chicken breast
  • 1 cup milk or 1/2 cup half-n-half
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 cup Marsala Wine (or more to taste)
  • 1 tsp oregano or majorum
  • 1 tsp dried parsley
  • 1 lb spaghetti or other pasta
  • 2 tsp butter

Directions:

Heat olive oil in large pan with lid
Season chicken with salt and paper.
Dredge in corn starch and shake off excess
Fry chicken breast until mostly cooked through
Add onions and garlic
Saute onions and garlic
When lightly browned add spaghetti to pan
Add chicken stock, oregano, parsley, stock, marsala wine, milk, butter
Add more stock or water to cover spaghetti, if needed
Season with salt and pepper as desired
Cover with lid and bring to boil, then set heat to low
Simmer until spaghetti is almost cooked through
Remove lid, raise heat to medium and reduce sauce to consistency of your choice
Serve

Coronavirus Kitchen – Sausage, Lentil, Kale Stew Recipe

March 19th, 2020 Comments off

Another homemade meal during our isolation. Tonight was a lovely stew made with Italian Sausage, green lentils, kale, and some sliced carrots thrown in for good measure.

Recipe

Lentil & Sausage Stew

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 4 cups coarsely chopped kale (or other leafy green)
  • 1 cup dried green or red lentils, rinsed and drained
  • 1/2 pound sausage, removed from casing (We also used some leftover smoked sausage, sliced and then quartered into bite size pieces)
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/4-1/2 teaspoon crushed chili flakes (to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1/8-1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (to taste)
  • 1/4 teaspoon chili powder
  • handful of shredded cheese (optional)

Directions:

1. Brown sausage in non-stick pan

2. Reduce heat to medium and deglaze the pan with the 1/4 cup of the chicken stock, add the garlic, chili flakes, paprika and cayenne pepper.

3. Toss in the greens and broth, heat until greens are wilted.

(Alternately, add kale near end of cooking for a different texture)

4. Add lentils and water, bring it back to a simmer and continue to cook for 20 to 25 minutes, stirring occasionally and season as needed with salt, pepper, chili powder, etc. to your liking. I found a pinch or two of chili powder added a nice touch with the paprika.

5. Serve, topping with shredded cheese, if desired

Categories: Cooking, Food, Recipe Tags: , , , , ,

We Tried 6 Methods of Caramelizing Onions and Found a Clear Winner via Kitchn

February 18th, 2020 Comments off
 
Even though I’ve been cooking personally and professionally for more than a decade, perfectly caramelized onions have always been elusive. This is probably because I’m extremely impatient, and as Slate once famously pointed out, many recipes lie about just how long it really takes to achieve true caramelization (doing it in five minutes is not a thing).
 
Despite that, there is no end to the methods that claim to make the task faster or easier. I was determined to try as many methods as I could find. After some careful research, I found six that looked interesting: a basic stovetop method from Bon Appétit, a quicker (15-minute) method from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt, a slow cooker method from the Pioneer Woman, an oven-roasted method from Food Network, an Instant Pot method from Martha Stewart, and finally a stovetop method from Cooks Illustrated that suggested using a little baking soda.

Pitcher Cocktail Recipe: Sparkling Rosemary Cider via Kitchn

December 18th, 2019 Comments off
This sounds quite tasty. I might make up a partial batch just to try it out before committing to serving it to others, though. — Douglas
 
Pitcher Cocktail Recipe: Sparkling Rosemary Cider via Kitchn
 
Read Pitcher Cocktail Recipe: Sparkling Rosemary Cider via Kitchn



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† Available from the LA Public Library


An interesting link found among my daily reading

29 Egg Recipes for Much More Than Breakfast via Food52

July 18th, 2017 Comments off
“The Incredible, Edible Egg” — as the old advertisement used to say. I found several different recipes I want to try from this article. My favorites include Shakshuka Focaccia, Bacon & Egg Ramen. Savory Ris-Oat-to with Poached Egg by Ali Conklin, and Sheet Pan Eggs by Ali Slagle. To be honest, I’m still reading my way through all the recipes and I might find even more I like. — Douglas
 
 

In culinary school my cooking instructors touted the importance of eggs: The traditional chef’s toque is rumored to have 100 folds, one fold to represent the hundred ways to prepare an egg. We’d be forewarned that sometimes the skills test given during line cook interviews would simply be to cook an egg.

Regardless of technique and form, it’s undeniable that eggs are an indispensable ingredient, well suited for any time of the day. Here are 29 of our favorite ways to use them:

Read 29 Egg Recipes for Much More Than Breakfast via Food52



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

10 Bits of Cooking Savvy We Picked Up Hanging Out in the Kitchen via Food52

April 28th, 2017 Comments off
I have learned most — if not all – all my best cooking tricks from watching others, whether that is television chefs on the Food Network or Maria Gaetana in Agira — looking over her shoulder while she fried up cotoletta vittelo (Veal Cutlets) for pranza while all the other uomini (men) stood outside on the balcony smoking.
 
So, as a reinforcement of learning by watching, here are 10 great ideas you can apply in your kitchen — hopefully to great success! — Douglas
 
 
In the same way that I’m in awe of friends who have learned new languages by “immersion”—but how do you start, I’ve wondered? And what keeps you from just, you know, staying silent for all of eternity?—I am also confounded by older, wiser, better cooks who tell me that I’ll learn to cook by, well, cooking.
 
But how? It never seemed to add up. I’ve held a brain in biology class, and it really isn’t very much like a sponge.

And yet, when I think back to how I cooked five years ago, and think about the knowledge that I seem to have osmosed, I’m shocked to realize that just the act of cooking is also an act of learning. Nearly every recipe—even those not billed as life-changing—has a valuable tidbit or takeaway that can be applied to other future recipes.
 
Read 10 Bits of Cooking Savvy We Picked Up Hanging Out in the Kitchen via Food52



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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Strawberry Rhubarb Cobbler with Cornmeal Biscuits and Honeyed Cream via Joy the Baker

April 19th, 2017 Comments off

Strawberries, Rhubarb, biscuits and cream. Not much more to say about this except YUM! — Douglas

 
I swear… as soon as we wind our clocks forward and tack that extra hour of daylight to our evenings, I’m sure it’s summer.  I’m sure it’s time for a new pair of (now age appropriate) jean shorts, time for pink wine and pink sunsets, time for me to start chasing the sound of summer waves crashing on summer beaches.  

Time, really… for me to hold my horses.  

Because spring. Because there’s this easing into summer that usually involves lots of spring rain and surprisingly crisp days and just blooming flowers. In these gloriously crisp and blooming days we get welcome early strawberries and right-on-time rhubarb.  It’s only natural that we combine the two in some sort of pie iteration.
 


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Noted: Cheesy Grits with Eggs Recipe

April 3rd, 2017 Comments off
Yes, yes and yes. Bon Appetit hits the nail on the head with this recipe. I would probably skip the jalapeños, but otherwise, bring on the breakfast. — Douglas
 
 
Read Cheesy Grits with Eggs Recipe via Bon Appetit


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Revisited: Simple Soft and Chewy Ginger Cookies – Yum! [Food]

January 11th, 2017 Comments off

I revisited these cookies a couple of times over the holiday season — once for my annual cookie party and then as something to share when visiting friends. In both cases — and almost universally — these cookies are a great hit with nearly everyone. In fact, the have become one of my favorite cookies — if not THE favorite — of anything else I make.

Even better, they are nearly foolproof to make. Some other recipes — like most baking — can be a bit fussy, but I have made these in my big KitchenAid mixer, with a hand mixer and even mixed them by hand with a wooden spoon.

New Food: Chewy Ginger Cookies - 18

Soft and Chewy Ginger Cookies

…from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Taste of Home magazine

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 2-1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Additional sugar for rolling

Directions:

1) Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

2) Cream butter and sugar in a large bowl until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and molasses. In a separate bowl combine flour, ginger, baking soda, cinnamon, cloves and salt. Gradually add to creamed mixture and mix well.

3) Roll into 1-1/2-inch balls, then roll in sugar. Place 2 inches apart on ungreased baking sheets. Bake for 10-12 minutes or until puffy, lightly browned and cracks appear. Remove to wire racks to cool. Yield: 2-1/2 dozen.

See my original post on Soft and Chewy Ginger Cookies

Categories: Baking, Cooking, Food Tags: , , , , ,