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Historical Cooking Books – 90 in a series – Culinary chemistry : Exhibiting The Scientific Principles Of Cookery by Friedrich Christian Accum (1821)

February 28th, 2021 No comments

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Culinary chemistry : Exhibiting The Scientific Principles Of Cookery, with concise instructions for preparing good and wholesome pickles, vinegar, conserves, fruit jellies, marmalades, and various other alimentary substances employed in domestic economy, with observations on the chemical constitution and nutritive qualities of different kinds of food. With copper plates by Friedrich Christian Accum (1821)

Culinary chemistry : Exhibiting The Scientific Principles Of Cookery by Friedrich Christian Accum (1821) Cover

Culinary chemistry : Exhibiting The Scientific Principles Of Cookery by Friedrich Christian Accum (1821) Preface

Culinary chemistry : Exhibiting The Scientific Principles Of Cookery by Friedrich Christian Accum (1821) Plate showing kitchen tools

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

 

 

PREFACE. LONDON, COMPTON STREET, SOHO.

The following pages are intended to exhibit a popular view of the philosophy of cookery, to enable the reader to understand the chemical principles, by means of which alimentary substances are rendered palatable and nutritious. The subject may appear frivolous ; but let it be remembered that it is by the application of the principles of philosophy to the ordinary affairs of life, that science diffuses her benefits, and perfects her claim to the gratitude of mankind.

The art of preparing good and wholesome food is, undoubtedly, a branch of chemistry $ the kitchen is a chemical laboratory ; all the processes employed for rendering alimentary substances fit for human sustenance, are chemical processes ; and much waste of the materials, as well as labour to the parties, might often be spared, were those who practise this art, made acquainted with some simple chemical truths which invariably would lead to certain results. I have, in the first place, premised, as introductory to what follows, some general observations on the various kinds of alimentary substances commonly used for food ; in which I haye noticed their chemical constitution, and comparative nutritive qualities. After these preliminary statements, I have proceeded to explain the summary processes of the culinary art, as practised in the English kitchen, to render obvious the chemical effects produced by the operations of roasting, boiling, stewing, broiling, frywing, and other means employed for dressing food.

I have given concise, but accurate directions for preparing good and wholesome pickles, and other condiments employed in domestic economy.

I have pointed out the rules to be attended to in the art of con serving recent fruits, and other vegetable substances, in the state of what are called preserves, marmalades, fruit jams, and jellies, to enable the reader to prepare those kinds of comfitures with economy and success.

I have given concise directions for preserving butcher’s meat, fish, and fowl, after being cooked, to render them fit for sea store, or domestic use, at a future time.

I have stated the most approved processes for curing bacon, hams, smoked beef, and salted fish T to which I have added instructions for the choice of butcher’s meat, and the best methods of constructing pantries, larders, and meat safes.

I have pointed out the loss of weight which different kinds of meat suffers in the usual operations of cooking.

I have described the most approved methods for preserving recently gathered fruits in their natural state, as nearly as possible, with directions for constructing fruit rooms, and the circumstances to be attended to u storing esculent roots and other vegetables*

I have animadverted on certain material errors, sometimes committed through ignorance or negligence, in the preparation of food, and various delicacies of the table ; and I have also given hints that will be found useful, with regard to the practice of making tea and coffee. And lastly, I have made some remarks on the construction of kitchen fire-places, to which I have added designs, exhibiting the most approved cooking apparatus, calculated for the use of private families or public establishments. In resuming the whole, I have endeavoured (and I hope with some degree of success,) to communicate to those to whom the superintendance of a family is entrusted, such useful culinary information as may lead to beneficial consequences.

FREDRICK ACCUM. 1821.

 

 

PEACH MARMALADE.

Peel the peaches and take out the stones, simmer them till half done, then drain them, reduce them to a pulp, and squeeze the mass through a coarse splinter sieve. Weigh the pulp, and to every pound add twelve ounces of powdered loaf sugar; simmer the mass till it has acquired a stiff pasty consistence.

 

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Publication date 1821
Topics CookingFood
Publisher London : published by R. Ackermann
Collection leedsuniversitylibraryukmhlmedicalheritagelibraryeuropeanlibraries
Digitizing sponsor Jisc and Wellcome Library
Contributor University of Leeds Library
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Historical Cooking Books – 84 in a series – 30 good recipes for using Eiffel Tower Bun Flour (1880)

January 17th, 2021 Comments off

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books – 84 in a series – 30 good recipes for using Eiffel Tower Bun Flour (1880)

Historical Cooking Books - 84 in a series - 30 good recipes for using Eiffel Tower Bun Flour (1880)

Historical Cooking Books - 84 in a series - 30 good recipes for using Eiffel Tower Bun Flour (1880)

Historical Cooking Books - 84 in a series - 30 good recipes for using Eiffel Tower Bun Flour (1880)

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

HOME BAKING SIMPLIFIED.

Eiffel Tower Bun Flour is a real help to the housewife, to the experienced cook, or to the expert chef. From the making of the plainest buns, cakes, or pastry for the most modest household to the making of the richest varieties for the banquet it is invaluable and equally successful.

Eiffel Tower Bun Flour is entirely distinct from any other preparation. There is an ease and certainty in its use which has made it famous among lovers of dainty buns, digestible home¬ made cakes, and light pastry. Try a packet at once.

Home-made buns, cakes and pastries made with Eiffel Tower Bun Flour have a daintiness and sweetness which is quite distinct from those made any other way.

Sold in 1d. and 31/2d. pkts. Lemon, Almond, Vanilla and Plain.

NOTICE.“Every Recipe in this Book is Good.

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Publication date 1880
Topics CookingFlourFood IndustryAdvertising as TopicGreat Britain
Publisher [Place of publication not identified] : [publisher not identified]
Collection wellcomelibraryukmhlmedicalheritagelibraryeuropeanlibraries
Digitizing sponsor Wellcome Library
Contributor Wellcome Library
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Historical Cooking Books – 79 in a series – The Magic cook book (1930) by Standard Brands Limited

December 13th, 2020 Comments off

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books – 79 in a series – The Magic cook book (1930) by Standard Brands Limited

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Ginger Bread

2/3 cup butter
2 eggs
1 cup molasses
1 cup brown sugar
2 teaspoons ginger
1 teaspoon each cinnamon and cloves
1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
I cup sour milk
1 teaspoon Magic Soda
3 cups flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon Magic Baking Powder

Pour hot melted butter into the molasses, add sugar and well beaten eggs; sift together dry ingredients and add to first mixture alternately with sour milk. Beat well. Bake in greased and floured shallow pan 40 minutes in 350° F. oven.

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

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Publication date 1930
Topics Baking — Canada.Desserts.Cooking, Canadian.Baking powder.McGill University Library Digitized TitleCookbook CollectionBakingDessertsCooking, CanadianBaking powder
Publisher Toronto : Standard Brands
Collection mcgilluniversitymcgilluniversityrarebookstoronto
Contributor McGill University Library
Language English

Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

The Internet Archive’s VHS Vault will send you on a 90s nostalgia trip via The Verge

April 22nd, 2020 Comments off
The Internet Archive, perhaps best known for the extremely handy Wayback Machine you can use to find older versions of webpages, also has free movies, books, software, and music. Yet a little known part of the organization’s media trove includes uploaded recordings from VHS tapes, as I learned today thanks to this Vice article. They live on The VHS Vault, and as of this writing, there are more than 20,000 recordings you can peruse.

The Internet Archive is now working to preserve vinyl LPs via kottke.org

April 11th, 2020 Comments off

The Internet Archive is an absolute treasure with a gigantic task ahead of them. They have now set their sights on vinyl LPs and started the work of digitizing and archiving these recordings.

Earlier this year, the Internet Archive began working with the Boston Public Library (BPL) to digitize more than 100,000 audio recordings from their sound collection. The recordings exist in a variety of historical formats, including wax cylinders, 78 rpms, and LPs. They span musical genres including classical, pop, rock, and jazz, and contain obscure recordings like this album of music for baton twirlers , and this record of radio’s all-time greatest bloopers .