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Posts Tagged ‘IFTTT’

Home School: How ‘Wild’ was the Wild West via History Matters on YouTube

August 2nd, 2020 Comments off
We’ve all heard the stories of the Wild West. Saloon Brawls, duels at high noon, ladies being tied to Train Tracks by moustachioed gentlemen, Cowboys fighting Indians. But how true is any of this? To put it bluntly. Just how ‘Wild’ was the Wild West. Find out in this short animated simple history documentary.
Watch How ‘Wild’ was the Wild West via History Matters on YouTube


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The US Department of Justice was originally created to tackle white supremacy via Boing Boing

July 31st, 2020 Comments off

Americanism has a weird obsession with vague notions of “law and order.” At its core, there’s nothing unique about a society whose existence depends on a collective respect for its own internal rule system — indeed, that’s basically just a society. But those who buy the narrative of Good Ol’ American Jingoism love to toss around their platitudes about being a “nation of laws,” without giving much thought to what that actually means, or who is served by that law and order. Whatever the status quo they got used to, that’s the way things have always been, and thus, it is right.

Consider the US Department of Justice. I’ve never even given much thought to its founding; I hadn’t thought much about the origins of police departments growing out of slave patrols until it was explicitly brought to my attention either.

But Smithsonian Magazine has a great new piece about the origins of the DoJ, which began on July 1, 1870 — exactly 150 years ago this month. And it turns out, it’s a direct extension of Reconstruction-era struggles, and was created specifically to enforce racial equality by fighting voter suppression and the KKK:

Lentils With Rice, Leeks, and Spinach via Epicurious

July 13th, 2020 Comments off
 

Based on a Middle Eastern mujaddara, a homey mix of spiced simmered lentils and rice, this easy, meatless dish is rich with allspice, cinnamon, and sweet browned leeks. The handful of baby spinach stirred in toward the end turns it into a one-pot meal, and adds a bit of welcome color, too. If you don’t have leeks, use an onion or two instead.

Read Lentils With Rice, Leeks, and Spinach via Epicurious




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Mom Teaches Daughter How To Make Bao via BuzzFeedVideo on YouTube [Video]

July 8th, 2020 Comments off

‎99% Invisible: 403- Return of the Yokai via Apple Podcasts

July 8th, 2020 Comments off
In the US, mascots are used to pump up crowds at sporting events, or for traumatizing generations of children at Chuck E. Cheese, but in Japan it’s different. There are mascots for towns, aquariums, dentists’ offices, even prisons. There are mascots in cities that tell people not to litter, or remind them to be quiet on the train. Everything has a mascot and anything can be a mascot. The reason why mascots and character culture flourish in Japan is connected with the nation’s fascinating history with mythical monsters known as Yokai.

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Home School: Did Ancient Rome and China Know About Each Other? via History Matters on YouTube [Video]

July 1st, 2020 Comments off

How a Former Rocket Scientist Makes the Best Copper Pots in America — Handmade via Eater on YouTube

June 24th, 2020 Comments off
Rocket scientist-turned-coppersmith Jim Hamann’s devotion to cookware came from a beautiful vintage pot he found on a trip to France. After starting a business restoring copper pots and pans for others, he decided to begin handcrafting his own, honoring the methods and quality of the centuries-old tradition at his company Duparquet Copper Cookware.
Watch How a Former Rocket Scientist Makes the Best Copper Pots in America — Handmade via Eater on YouTube




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Strawberry Refrigerator Cake via Bake at 350°

June 24th, 2020 Comments off

Prepare yourselves for the easiest, creamiest, summery-est (is that a word?) dessert you can make: No-Bake Strawberry Refrigerator Cake!

*this recipe was created for Imperial Sugar

Read Strawberry Refrigerator Cake via Bake at 350°


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How a recording-studio mishap shaped ’80s music via Vox on YouTube

June 20th, 2020 Comments off
How a recording-studio mishap shaped '80s music via Vox on YouTube

Warning: This is an unapologetic ode to gated reverb drums

Here’s a Spotify playlist of some of the best gated reverb songs,

Over the past few years a general nostalgia for the 1980s has infiltrated music, film, and television. I deeply love those gated reverb drums of the ’80s – you know that punchy percussive sound popularized by Phil Collins and Prince? So for my second episode of Vox Pop’s Earworm I spoke with two Berklee College of Music professors, Susan Rogers and Prince Charles Alexander, to figure out just how that sound came to be, what makes it so damn punchy, and why it’s back. 

Home School: The Romanian Revolution: Explained via History Matters on YouTube

June 15th, 2020 Comments off
I love learning about history I haven’t been exposed to before. These short videos fill in blank spots in my knowledge and help knit together the story of the past. — Douglas
 
In 1989, a wave of revolution swept across Eastern Europe, disrupting the Communist governments of Poland, East Germany, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Hungary and of course, Romania. But how did the Romanian Revolution play out and why couldn’t Nicolae Ceaușescu or the authorities stop it like they had done previously? And why did it end the way it did? With the same people still in power and the Ceaușescu’s subject to a mock trial.
Watch The Romanian Revolution: Explained via History Matters on YouTube


An interesting link found among my daily reading