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Posts Tagged ‘education’

How to Keep Your Photographic Muscles Flexing During the Times of Isolation via Digital Photography School

April 23rd, 2020 Comments off

We’re currently facing challenges that most of us haven’t faced before. How do you keep photographing when you can’t visit interesting locations or meet your models? Here are some ideas for you to exercise your photographic muscles during this time of isolation.

According to where you live, you may be more or less constrained regarding your travel distances. Maybe the problem is not even reaching an adventurous place but you can’t even get to your studio. Whichever is your case, these ideas are meant for you to keep photographing with minimum resources.

Home School: The Smithsonian has released more than 2.8 million images you can use for free via The Verge

April 21st, 2020 Comments off

The Smithsonian Institution is releasing 2.8 million high-res images from its massive collection into the public domain, putting them online for anyone to use and download for free. The open-access online platform will include 2D and 3D images from its 19 museums, nine research centers, archives, libraries, and the National Zoo, Smithsonian Magazine reports.

“Being a relevant source for people who are learning around the world is key to our mission,” Effie Kapsalis, the Smithsonian’s senior digital program officer, says. “We can’t imagine what people are going to do with the collections. We’re prepared to be surprised.”

Home School: MoMA Now Offers Free Art Classes Online via Gizmodo

April 19th, 2020 Comments off

While New York’s Museum of Modern Art is closed to the public right now, its virtual doors are open in the form of a few free classes from the museum.

MoMA is offering nine free classes through Coursera:

  • Fashion as Design
  • In the Studio: Postwar Abstract Paining
  • What is Contemporary Art?
  • Art & Ideas: Teaching with Themes
  • Art & Inquiry: Museum Teaching Strategies For Your Classroom
  • Seeing Through Photographs
  • Art & Activity: Interactive Strategies for Engaging with Art
  • Modern Art & Ideas
  • Sheying (taught in Chinese)

Classes take anywhere from 12 to 38 hours to complete and can be done at whatever speed you’d like.

Read MoMA Now Offers Free Art Classes Online via Gizmodo





An interesting link found among my daily reading

After COVID-19 – 4 in a series – You’ve Got This

April 17th, 2020 Comments off

After COVID-19 - 4 in a series - You've Got This

Photo: NeONBRAND

I was chatting with a long time friend today on our private Discord server and he was telling us how he was about to start teaching his first remote class for his Junior High students. This man is one of the best educators I know. He is knowledgeable not only in technology, his educational topics of specialization but also in education itself.

It surprised me a bit when he confessed he was feeling very nervous about his first class. Again, this person is someone I consider an educator’s educator, but as with all of us, doubt can creep in at the oddest times.

Partly this is because we all consistently under-acknowledge and undervalue our own knowledge and skills. It seems to be a universal trait of human nature. Sure, there are the narcissistic and arrogant among us, but I believe the majority of us carry doubts and fears about our own abilities and in most cases these doubts and fears are baseless.

How do I know this? It is because I suffer in the same, human, way as everyone else. We always need to look for a trusted external source to tell us the truth about our own knowledge and skills. These are the friends who know when to tell us we are full of sh*t and know when we are not giving ourselves enough credit. It is here we find the truth which we can find so hard to see ourselves.

So, yes, it can be a little scary, a little stressful, even a bit panic-inducing but trust me, you’ve got this. You know how to do this and you know how to do it well. Will there be hiccups? Sure! Not every day in the classroom runs as smoothly as you might wish, but in the end, you (and your students) will be fine. You will get through this, together, and learn much along the way.

In fact, you might even find your skills growing with new innovations that you have been wanting to try but didn’t have space or time. Being forced into remote teaching might be the best thing for education in decades. Sometimes we need extraordinary circumstances — and the freedom to address those circumstances — to really grow in our profession, no matter what it might be.

Again, you’ve got this. I know because I know you. I can see the person you can’t always see in yourself.

What are your thoughts? Leave them in the comments!

Home School: Netflix puts free documentaries on YouTube for students and teachers via Engadget

April 17th, 2020 Comments off
To help teachers and students learning from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, Netflix is making a handful of documentaries available for free on its Netflix US YouTube channel. At the moment, there are 10 documentary films and series available, including 13th, Babies, Chasing Coral, Knock Down the House and Our Planet. Each comes with educational resources, like discussion questions, ways to take action and more info. Netflix says it plans to add Q&As with some of the project creators soon.

Home School: Paris Museums Put 100,000 Images Online for Unrestricted Public Use via Kottke

April 16th, 2020 Comments off

Home School: How KLAUS Was Rendered via Tom Preston on YouTube

April 13th, 2020 Comments off

This is a quick summary of how the film Klaus was lit and colored based on research and a few clips demonstrating the technology used.

Please keep in mind this is based on a handful of interviews and demonstration clips I’ve found online and may not be 100% exactly how the process was done, but I’ve tried my best to summarize the process as clearly as I can. The whole process is still being kept rather secretive and the information is limited.

I freely admit I might be wrong about some of the finer details.

Watch How KLAUS Was Rendered


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: The Vatican Library Goes Online and Digitizes Tens of Thousands of Manuscripts, Books, Coins, and More via Open Culture

April 13th, 2020 Comments off
If any one of us ran our own country, we’d surely drive no small amount of resources toward building an impressive national library. That would be true even if we ran a country the size of the Vatican, the smallest sovereign state in the world — but one that, unsurprisingly, punches well above its weight in terms of the size and historical value of its holdings. “It was in 1451 when Pope Nicholas V, a renowned bibliophile himself, attempted to re-establish Rome as an academic center of global importance,” writes Aleteia’s Daniel Esparza. That formidable task involved first “building a relatively modest library of over 1,200 volumes, including his personal collection of Greek and Roman classics and a series of texts brought from Constantinople.”

Home School: New Year’s Resolutions for Creative Photographers via Digital Photography School

April 13th, 2020 Comments off

Take some time to review the photos that you’ve taken during the past year. Pick out the ones that you like the most and try to think about why they make you feel that way. Are they perhaps full of happy memories? Or did they mark a moment when you understood a new technique?

Consider turning your favorite photos from the year into a photo book to permanently make a record of what you achieved. Think of it as being like a journal of your hobby that you can look back on in the future to see how much your approach to taking photographs has changed.

Read New Year’s Resolutions for Creative Photographers via Digital Photography School





An interesting link found among my daily reading

Home School: Why Should We Read William Shakespeare? Four Animated Videos Make the Case via Open Culture

April 10th, 2020 Comments off

Sooner or later, we all encounter the plays of William Shakespeare: whether on the page, the stage, or—maybe most frequently these days—the screen. Over four hundred years after his death, Shakespeare is still very much relevant, not only as the most recognizable name in English literature, but also perhaps as its most famous storyteller, even if we don’t recognize his hand in modern adaptations that barely resemble their originals.

But if we can turn Shakespeare’s plays into other kinds of entertainment that don’t require us to read footnotes or sit flummoxed in the audience while actors make archaic jokes, why should we read Shakespeare at all? He can be profoundly difficult to understand, an issue even his first audiences encountered, since he stuffed his speeches not only with hundreds of loan words, but hundreds of his own coinages as well.