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Books on Hold: Homemade Pantry: 101 Foods You Can Stop Buying and Start Making by Alana Chernila

February 9th, 2013 Comments off

Books on Hold is a blog series dedicated to books I have seen in passing and requested from my local library. See more in the series at the end of this blog post. — Douglas

Another cookbook for the “To Read” pile. #KitchenParty has been a big influence on my reading habits lately. We have taken to making a lots of the foods that we used to buy, whenever we can. This can be something siple like making our own Taco Meat spice mix or something more complicated like making our own pasta. I look forward to checking out the recipes here to see what else we might be able to make at home.

Homemade Pantry: 101 Foods You Can Stop Buying and Start Making by Alana Chernila

From Amazon.com…

“This is my kitchen. Come on in, but be prepared—it might not be quite what you expect. There is flour on the counter, oats that overflowed onto the floor, chocolate-encrusted spoons in the sink. There is Joey, the husband, exhausted by the thirty-five preschoolers who were hanging on him all day, and he is stuffing granola into his mouth to ease his five o’clock starvation. There are two little girls trying to show me cartwheels in that miniscule space between the refrigerator and the counter where I really need to be.”

In her debut cookbook, Alana Chernila inspires you to step inside your kitchen, take a look around, and change the way you relate to food. The Homemade Pantry was born of a tight budget, Alana’s love for sharing recipes with her farmers’ market customers, and a desire to enjoy a happy cooking and eating life with her young family. On a mission to kick their packaged-food habit, she learned that with a little determination, anything she could buy at the store could be made in her kitchen, and her homemade versions were more satisfying, easier to make than she expected, and tastier.

Here are her very approachable recipes for 101 everyday staples, organized by supermarket aisle—from crackers to cheese, pesto to sauerkraut, and mayonnaise to toaster pastries. The Homemade Pantry is a celebration of food made by hand—warm mozzarella that is stretched, thick lasagna noodles rolled from flour and egg, fresh tomato sauce that bubbles on the stove. Whether you are trying a recipe for butter, potato chips, spice mixes, or ketchup, you will discover the magic and thrill that comes with the homemade pantry.

Alana captures the humor and messiness of everyday family life, too. A true friend to the home cook, she shares her “tense moments” to help you get through your own. With stories offering patient, humble advice, tips for storing the homemade foods, and rich four-color photography throughout, The Homemade Pantry will quickly become the go-to source for how to make delicious staples in your home kitchen. 

Previously in Books on Hold:

Categories: Baking, Books, Bread, Cooking, DIY, Food Tags:

Cookbook: Pure Dessert by Alice Medrich

February 6th, 2013 Comments off

This was a random cookbook discovered first through The Kitchn blog. It sounded interesting enough to pick up at my local library and I have finally had a moment to look through it and give my impressions.

Pure Dessert by Alice Medrich

* Discovered via The Kitchn

Medrich writes about food with a passion, as do many food writers and cookbook authors. There is a true joy to be felt in her words about techniques and ingredients which grace the first sections of the book. She discusses how to measure flour, cocoa powder and liquids. Then she moves no to discussions of how and where to find the very best ingredients — and these ingredients are the inspiration for most of the recipes in the book.

As a more amateur baker, some of her recipes use unfamiliar ingredients and can take more time than the typical recipe, but I think there is something to be gained by engaging with these ingredients and working at little harder at the food we make. I am a notoriously fussy eater, but there are many recipes here that sound intriguing enough to try at least once.

Featured recipes include:

  • Sour Cream Ice Cream
  • Buckwheat Strawberry Shortcakes
  • Nutella Bread Pudding
  • …and many more!

As always, it was the many cookie and cookie-like recipes that caught my eye the most. I marked a few of the recipes to keep for later use, including:

  • My Gingersnaps
  • Coffee-Walnut Cookies
  • Honey Snaps
  • Cocoa Wafers
  • and a cocoa fudge sauce that looks very decadent

From Amazon.com…

When you are working with great ingredients, you want to keep it simple. You don’t want to blur flavor by overcomplicating. This is why Pure Dessert, from the beloved Alice Medrich, offers the simplest of recipes, using the fewest ingredients in the most interesting ways. There are no glazes, fillings, or frostings—just dessert at its purest, most elemental, and most flavorful.

Alice deftly takes us places we haven’t been, using, for example, whole grains, usually reserved for breads, to bring a lovely nutty quality to cookies and strawberry shortcake. Pound cake takes on a new identity with a touch of olive oil and sherry. Unexpected cheeses make divine soufflés. Chestnut flour and walnuts virtually transform meringue. Varietal honeys and raw sugars infuse ice creams and sherbets with delectable new flavor.”

Previously in Cookbooks:

Categories: Baking, Books, Bread, Cooking, Food, Recipe Tags:

Video: #KitchenParty 2012 – Season 1 – Watch all the shows here

December 28th, 2012 Comments off

Here is a complete index of all the #KitchenParty shows from 2012. #KitchenParty started on September 13, 2012 and has aired LIVE each Thursday night at 8pm via Google Hangouts. Afterwards each show is archived on the BakespaceTV YouTube Channel.

Kitchen party 2012

#KitchenParty 2012 from Bakespace.com

Recipes in Rotation: No Fuss Focaccia Bread

December 25th, 2012 Comments off

Rnr logoRecipes in Rotation is a series that allows me to highlight recipes that have made their way into “the book.” This book is the binder that contains recipes we make on a regular basis — at least monthly and in some cases, every two weeks. I keep them in this special binder for quick and easy access without sorting through a bunch of other recipes to speed things up when I need to get dinner on the table.

Today’s recipe is a No Fuss Focaccia Bread 

No Fuss Focaccia

No Fuss Focaccia

Let me tell you, it lives up to its “No Fuss” name and also makes a great piece of bread. Look at the cross section here. Crunchy on the outside and wonderfully fluffy on the inside. We started tearing pieces off this load to try and had to stop ourselves before we had no room left for our actual dinner.

On great use would be to cut off a good-sized square, then slice it in half cross ways and make a rockin’ sandwich. I have just such plans for some of the leftovers.

To make, you combine all the ingredients in a mixer (I have one of the smaller KitchenAid models) and beat it for about 1 minute. This is a basically a “no knead” bread, so the dough is really shaggy and sticky. Don’t worry, though, just tip the whole thing into greased 13×9 pan and do your best spread it around to cover most of the pan. Leave it set for an hour and it will puff up and fill the pan.

I followed the original recipe and topped it with a mixture of basil, oregano, onion and garlic powder. Bake for around 30-25 minutes or until golden brown.

I know I will be making this Focaccia again, probably whenever we have friends over for one of our regular pasta dinners. You could dress it up in any number of ways, topping with whatever ingredients strike your fancy. I’m thinking you could even make a nice rustic pizza by letting it rise on a larger pan, maybe a half sheet pan and then lightly topping it with sauce and more.

Can’t see the video above? Watch “How to make No-Fuss Focaccia Bread” on YouTube

You can also see the recipe and steps in this SnapGuide.

 Check out How to Make No Fuss Focaccia by Douglas Welch on Snapguide.

No Fuss Focaccia Bread

(See this recipe on Bakespace.com)

 Ingredients

1 1/2 cups warm water
3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil (plus extra for drizzling)
1 1/4 tsp salt
3 1/2 cups (14 3/4 oz) all-purpose flour
1 Tbsp instant yeast
2 tsp onion powder
4 tsp Italian seasoning

Directions

Spray a 13 x 9 pan with cooking spray then drizzle 1-2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil over the bottom of the pan.

Place the water, olive oil, salt, flour and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Beat on high speed for about 1 minute. The dough will be smooth, elastic and sticky.

Transfer the dough to the prepared baking pan. With oil or water on the tip of your fingers (don’t use more flour, you want the dough to remain sticky), press the dough into the bottom of the pan, nudging to get it all the way into the corners. Cover the pan and let the dough rise for about 60 minutes, or until it is puffy.

While the dough rises, preheat oven to 375°F.

Once risen, uncover the pan and use your fingers to make dimples all over the dough (you may need a bit of oil on your fingers if the dough is too sticky). Drizzle the dough lightly with olive oil and sprinkle it with the Italian seasoning.

Bake for 35-40 minutes, or until the bread is golden brown. Remove the pan to a wire rack to cool for 5 minutes, then turn the focaccia out of the pan (otherwise the bottom crust will get soggy). Serve warm or at room temperature.

Originally from King Arthur Flour via Delish

Previously in Recipes in Rotation:

 

Video: My Word on Food: Making No-Fuss Focaccia

May 13th, 2012 Comments off

This recipe is a family favorite. Not only is it tasty, but it is easy to make. You can top this focaccia with just about anything you like. This recipe uses olive oil, Italian seasoning and parmaggiano cheese. The bread can be sliced to make paninni, used as an accompaniment to pasta or used as a base for pizza. Try it out and tell me what you think in the comments.

This recipe was originally created as a Snapguide using their iPhone app. You can check out this and other Snapguides here.

If you enjoy this recipe video, please click Like and/or subscribe on my YouTube channel.

no-fuss-focaccia

Can’t see the video above? Watch “Making No-Fuss Focaccia” on YouTube.

 

Subscribe to Douglas’ YouTube Channel | Watch the My Word…on Food YouTube Playlist

Subscribe to the My Word with Douglas E. Welch podcast using iTunes

No Fuss Focaccia – Recipe

1 1/2 cups warm water
3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil (plus extra for drizzling)
1 1/4 tsp salt
3 1/2 cups (14 3/4 oz) all-purpose flour
1 Tbsp instant yeast
2 tsp onion powder
4 tsp Italian seasoning

Spray a 13 x 9 pan with cooking spray then drizzle 1-2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil over the bottom of the pan.

Place the water, olive oil, salt, flour and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Beat on high speed for about 1 minute. The dough will be smooth, elastic and sticky.

Transfer the dough to the prepared baking pan. With oil or water on the tip of your fingers (don’t use more flour, you want the dough to remain sticky), press the dough into the bottom of the pan, nudging to get it all the way into the corners. Cover the pan and let the dough rise for about 60 minutes, or until it is puffy.

While the dough rises, preheat oven to 375°F.

Once risen, uncover the pan and use your fingers to make dimples all over the dough (you may need a bit of oil on your fingers if the dough is too sticky). Drizzle the dough lightly with olive oil and sprinkle it with the Italian seasoning.

Bake for 35-40 minutes, or until the bread is golden brown. Remove the pan to a wire rack to cool for 5 minutes, then turn the focaccia out of the pan (otherwise the bottom crust will get soggy). Serve warm or at room temperature.

Source: King Arthur Flour

Categories: Baking, Bread, Cooking, Food, Podcast, Show, Video Tags:

My Word…on Food! – Making No-Fuss Focaccia – A Snapguide

May 12th, 2012 Comments off

Here is a Snapguide for making my favorite No-Fuss Focaccia bread. We love this recipe. It is tasty and easy to make. No kneading required. You can use it to make paninni, as an accompaniment to pasta or even as a pizza crust.

Focaccia snapguide

Check out the Snapguide via this web link or via the FREE Snapguide app available for iPhone.

Categories: Baking, Bread, Cooking, Food Tags:
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