William Blake’s 102 Illustrations of The Divine Comedy Collected in a Beautiful Book from Taschen | Open Culture [Shared]

I am making my way through The Inferno section of Divine Comedy at the moment and it was a bit serendipitous that I happened across this article. Sometimes that’s the way things work. You start looking in One Direction and coincidentally new information will approach from another direction. Some say it is like thinking of buying a red car and then seeing red cars everywhere you go. It’s as if your mind unconsciously starts to pay attention to something related to whatever you are studying or reading. — Douglas


William Blake’s 102 Illustrations of The Divine Comedy Collected in a Beautiful Book from Taschen | Open Culture

William Blake's 102 Illustrations of The Divine Comedy Collected in a Beautiful Book from Taschen | Open Culture [Shared]

Blake did not read the Divine Comedy as a medieval Catholic believer but as a visionary 18th and 19th century English artist and poet who invented his own religion. He “taught himself Italian in order to be able to read the original” and had a “ complex relationship” with the text, writes Dante scholar Silvia De Santis.

Read William Blake’s 102 Illustrations of The Divine Comedy Collected in a Beautiful Book from Taschen | Open Culture

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