Historical Cooking Books – 94 in a series – Photoplay’s cook book : 100 favorite recipes of the stars (1927) by Carolyn Van Wyck

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Historical Cooking Books – 94 in a series – Photoplay’s cook book : 100 favorite recipes of the stars (1927) by Carolyn Van Wyck

Historical Cooking Books - 94 in a series - Photoplay's cook book : 100 favorite recipes of the stars (1927) by Carolyn Van Wyck

Historical Cooking Books - 94 in a series - Photoplay's cook book : 100 favorite recipes of the stars (1927) by Carolyn Van Wyck

Historical Cooking Books - 94 in a series - Photoplay's cook book : 100 favorite recipes of the stars (1927) by Carolyn Van Wyck

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INTRODUCTION

IN the course of my duties, as editor of Girls’ Problems in Photoplay Magazine, I have written scores of letters of friendly advice to girls and women all over the world. These letters have covered a wide range of subjects— how to dress, what to weigh, how to acquire charm and how to form social contacts.

This little book of 100 recipes, furnished by the screen stars, will answer many of the questions that come to me every month. A good complexion comes from correct eating. A good figure is largely a question of diet. An attractively served dinner reflects charm on its hostess. And I never have heard of a good cook who failed to find a husband or who had any trouble in holding him, once she had married him.

You will not find any charts or calories, proteins and vita- mines in this book. Personally, I believe that the business of counting calories often ruins the enjoyment of eating. How- ever, you will find among the recipes some delicious vegetable and fruit salads that should be on the menu of every woman who values her health, her complexion and her figure.

Moreover, as all the recipes are furnished by men and women whose first regard must be for their health and appearance, you will find that most of them fit in nicely on any sane schedule of eating.

This is, of course, in no sense a book on HOW to Cook. It is merely a guide of WHAT to cook. Most of the recipes are not beyond the skill of the average housewife or capable servant. Very few of them call for any delicacies that are not in stock in every kitchen.

The many “party” recipes, the many dishes that are appro- priate to luncheons, teas or suppers will make this little book priceless to the hostess. The foreign recipes, furnished by the French, German, Swedish and Hungarian stars, will add a wel- come variety to your menus.

Remember, too, that these recipes are the choice of discrimi- nating eaters and fastidious housewives, who have the best in the world at their command. With this recommendation, I am sure that you will find this book worthy of a permanent place in your kitchen library.

Carolyn Van Wyck.


Get these aprons for your cooking adventures.

Historical Cooking Books - 67 in a series - The school cookery book (1879) by C. E. Guthrie Wright



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