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Home > Books, History, Quotes, Reading > What I’m Reading: Life and Times of Frederick Douglass – 9 in a series – “…that men whose malign and brutal propensities preponderate over their moral and intellectual endowments”

What I’m Reading: Life and Times of Frederick Douglass – 9 in a series – “…that men whose malign and brutal propensities preponderate over their moral and intellectual endowments”

July 31st, 2019

“I speak of overseers as a class, for they were such. They were as distinct from the slave-holding gentry of the south as are the fish-women of Paris, and the coal-heavers of London, distinct from other grades of society. They constituted a separate fraternity at the south. They were arranged and classified by that great law of attraction which determines the sphere and affinities of men; which ordains that men whose malign and brutal propensities preponderate over their moral and intellectual endowments shall naturally fall into those employments which promise the largest gratification to those predominating instincts or propensities. The office of overseer took this raw material of vulgarity and brutality, and stamped it as a distinct class in southern life. But in this class, as in all other classes, there were sometimes persons of marked individuality, yet with a general resemblance to the mass.”

From Life and Times of Frederick Douglass: (An African American Heritage Book)

Why I'm Reading: He was whipped oftener who was whipped easiest.

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