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Home > Books, Cooking, History, Home, In the kitchen > Historical Cooking Books: The century cook book, with a new supplement of one hundred receipts of especial excellence by Arnold, Augusta (Foote) (1922, originally 1895) – 22 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: The century cook book, with a new supplement of one hundred receipts of especial excellence by Arnold, Augusta (Foote) (1922, originally 1895) – 22 in a series

January 21st, 2019

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: The century cook book, with a new supplement of one hundred receipts of especial excellence by Arnold, Augusta (Foote) (1922, originally 1895) – 22 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Historical Cooking Books: The century cook book, with a new supplement of one hundred receipts of especial excellence by Arnold, Augusta (Foote) (1922, originally 1895) - 22 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: The century cook book, with a new supplement of one hundred receipts of especial excellence by Arnold, Augusta (Foote) (1922, originally 1895) - 22 in a series

Historical Cooking Books: The century cook book, with a new supplement of one hundred receipts of especial excellence by Arnold, Augusta (Foote) (1922, originally 1895) - 22 in a seriesHistorical Cooking Books: The century cook book, with a new supplement of one hundred receipts of especial excellence by Arnold, Augusta (Foote) (1922, originally 1895) - 22 in a series

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WASTEFULNESS

As a rule the family life of America does not represent opulence, yet it has become a familiar saying that a French family could live on what an American family throws away. Again, it is said that in American kitchens half the provisions are spoiled and the” other half wasted. There is no need to-day of being open to such accusations. At small expense a woman can have the benefit of lessons in cooking-schools, and should not be accepted as a cook until she has some knowledge of the duties, and is qualified to bear that name. The gage of a woman’s rank in her profession can be definitely determined by what she wastes or utilizes, and the high wages paid a first-class cook are often saved by the intelligent use she makes of all her materials. Many of her best entr6es are but a combination of odds and ends which another cook would throw away. Her delicious sauce, which gives a very ordinary dish that requisite something which makes it highly esteemed, may be but the blending of many flavors obtained from little scraps.

The waste in foods need be so small as practically to have no waste material ; not a crumb of bread, a grain of sugar, a bit of butter, a scrap of meat or fat, a piece of vegetable or leaf of salad, but can be utilized with profit.


Publication date 1922
Publisher New York, D. Appleton-Century Company
Collection cornellamericana
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Contributor usage rights See terms
Language English
 
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