Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format
Close

Archive

Archive for January, 2019

Chiesa di Santa Maria del Carmine, Milano, Italia

January 29th, 2019 Comments off

Where are your favorite travel memories? Share in the comments!

Chiesa di Santa Maria del Carmine, Milano, Italia

Chiesa di Santa Maria del Carmine, Milano, Italia

Rosanne and I had stumbled upon this 1446 church a few days earlier on our wandering, but I returned on my way to a second visit to the Orto Botanico (Botanical Garden) in Brera.

This morning, though, I took the opportunity to stop, order a caffé (espresso) and a chocolate croissant, and just sit people watching and taking in the architecture of the church and the art in the piazza.

I was on my own on this visit, but it is one of my favorite memories of the trip. Even alone I found Milano to be friendly, welcoming and very livable. I felt more comfortable there than perhaps any other European city I have visited besides, perhaps, Bath and Leeds in the UK. London is fun but can be a bit too much after a few days.

When out on my own — and not looking a bit Italian in any way — I found it fun to joke with the wait staff at restaurants and museums. They would always start out in English and then expressed surprise and pleasure when I spoke Italian — even my first-grade version of it. Just another way I came to feel comfortable. Joking with everyone and generally having a great time.

Instagram  and Follow

Join me on Douglas E. Welch Photography on Facebook


Learn more about Milan

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Papers of President Theodore Roosevelt Now Online via The Library of Congress

January 28th, 2019 Comments off
I am a history buff — perhaps even a history addict — and sites like this are dangerous for me. I can go “down the rabbit hole” and not emerge for weeks if I am not careful. (LAUGH) Ok, maybe not that bad, but it can be serious time — not waster — but time sink. With all my historical interest, though, there are still wide gaps in my knowledge. I knew a few basics about “Teddy” but it was only when I watched The Roosevelts by Ken Burns that I developed a deeper understanding of them and how Theodore, Franklin and Eleanor were part of a long continuum of Roosevelt power over the decades.
 
Now that I have a bit more knowledge about the family, I am sure to better understand the primary documents included in this collection from the Library of Congress. When you have good base to build on, the specifics become a great deal clearer.
 
Do you have an interest in Theodore Roosevelt? Do you want to learn about him using his own words, letters and policies? Dig in, but be sure to tie an electronic “rope” around your waist so you can find your way out again! — Douglas
 
 

The largest collection of the papers of President Theodore Roosevelt, documenting his extraordinary career in the White House and as vice president, governor of New York, and as a naturalist, writer and reformer, has been digitized and is now available online from the Library of Congress.

The digitization of the massive collection comes just before the 160th anniversary of Roosevelt’s birthday. The nation’s 26th president was born Oct. 27, 1858, and died nearly 100 years ago on Jan. 6, 1919.

The Roosevelt collection is online at: loc.gov/collections/theodore-roosevelt-papers/about-this-collection/.

Read Papers of President Theodore Roosevelt Now Online via The Library of Congress


More on the Roosevelts

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Castello Sforzesco di Milano, Milano, Italia in Black and White and Color

January 28th, 2019 Comments off

Where are your favorite hidden discoveries? Share in the comments!

Castello Sforzesco di Milano, Milano, Italia in Black and White and Color

Castello Sforzesco di Milano, Milano, Italia in Black and White and Color

Castello Sforzesco di Milano, Milano, Italia

This huge, old castle can be seen from almost anywhere in the older section of Milan and works as a great landmark for navigation when walking the city. Two major subway stops are directly outside so it quickly became a touchstone for our travels around the city. 

It now holds 4 museums and anchors one end of a huge park. I ended up taking so many pictures as there are so many views of the castle. This was taken from inside the walls, looking up at the castle keep. 

Instagram  and Follow

Join me on Douglas E. Welch Photography on Facebook


Learn more about Milan

Learn more about black and white photography

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Historical Cooking Books: Twenty-five cent dinners for families of six (1879) by Corson, Juliet – 23 in a series

January 27th, 2019 Comments off

Archive.org has a host of old cookery books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas


Historical Cooking Books: Twenty-five cent dinners for families of six (1879) by Corson, Juliet – 23 in a series

What might you find in these old cookbooks? What special recipes have been handed down to you? Share in the Comments!

Twentyfivecentdi00corsrich 0005Twentyfivecentdi00corsrich 0007

Twentyfivecentdi00corsrich 0008Twentyfivecentdi00corsrich 0009

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more


PREFACE TO THE REVISED AND ENLARGED EDITION.

DURING the time that this little book has been a candidate for public favor, it has attained a success far beyond the expectations of its most sanguine advocates ; and in issuing this revised and enlarged edition the author returns her sincere thanks to both press and public, who have so substantially seconded her efforts for culinary reform. In this edition an additional chapter has been devoted to the preparation of fruit for dessert, withspecial reference to the needs of American housewives. Most American ladies prepare fruit for table use either by canning it, or making it into rich and expensive preserves; while both of these methods are palatable, and available for winter use, the receipts given in the closing chapter will provide a welcome variety for serving fresh fruits at the table, and will tend to increase the healthy consumption of those abundant and excellent domestic productions, while they cannot fail to decrease the deplorable prevalence of that objectionable national compound, the pie. Recent investigations concerning retail prices in different sections of the country confirm the author in the estimate of cost given in this work ; in certain localities some of the articles quoted are more expensive, while others are cheaper ; but the average is about equal.


Publication date 1879
Publisher New York, O. Judd Company
Collection cdlamericana
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Language English
 
 
Learn more about cooking history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Categories: Books, Cooking, Food, History, Home, In the kitchen Tags:

Chiesa di Santa Maria del Carmine, Milano, Italia

January 27th, 2019 Comments off

Where are your favorite travel surprises? Share in the comments!

Chiesa di Santa Maria del Carmine

Chiesa di Santa Maria del Carmine, Milano, Italia

While the exterior of this 1446 church is fairly plain, the interior is amazing. The light and shadows effect on the architecture are so dramatic is almost, literally, takes your breath away. We stepped in from the bright sun on a hot afternoon and it was like entering an entirely different world. The temperature dropped 10 degrees and it took several minutes for our eyes to adjust. We had entered from a side door, so we didn’t get the full effect until we moved up the enter aisle and took in this view. 

This is one of those photos that you easily remember taking. Unlike some, I believe that photography doesn’t take me out of the moment when I am Travelling, but rather makes my memories more vibrant and concrete when I return home. 

Instagram  and Follow

Join me on Douglas E. Welch Photography on Facebook


Learn more about Milan

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Into the courtyard, Museo del Risorgimento, Milano, Italia via Instagram

January 24th, 2019 Comments off

Where are your favorite hidden discoveries? Share in the comments!

Into the courtyard, Museo del Risorgimento, Milano, Italia via Instagram

Into the courtyard, Museo del Risorgimento, Milano, Italia via Instagram

From our September 2018 trip to see family and attend the SRN Conference.

So many small places away from the bustle of the city. For me, discovering these places is one of the most exquisite joys of travel — whether far abroad or in your own hometown. 

Milan is a great place to explore and discover. Some interesting places are on tourist guides and known to many others. These are wonderful, but it is the doorways, the courtyards, the side streets, the facades glimpsed at the end of a street luring you onward. I often find myself being pulled off my carefully planned path to one sight or another as it catches my eye.

This courtyard is the entrance to the Museo del Risorgimento (Museum of the Reunification of Italy – Google Translate). We explored its corners, finding steps to rest upon after thoroughly exploring the museum for research for @drrosannewelch ‘s latest book On Garibaldi. It was a hot day and the cool shade and stone were welcome discoveries if the mosquitos were a bit fierce. It is these experiences that stick in my memory and my photos. 

Instagram  and Follow

Join me on Douglas E. Welch Photography on Facebook


Learn more about Milan

Learn more about black and white photography

 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

🦁 Be the king/queen/whatever of your jungle! – Animal Themed Gifts from Douglas E. Welch

January 24th, 2019 Comments off

“Walking The Night” – Columbia, Missouri via Instagram

January 23rd, 2019 Comments off

When do you like to walk? Where? Share in the comments!

“Walking The Night” via Instagram

“Walking The Night”

Walking in the city at night is always such a different experience than walking it during the day. You happen upon scenes that don’t occur at any other time of day. They surprise you. In the dark you don’t see the scenes coming, they are suddenly just thrust upon you in the glow of the street lamp or the glare of car headlamps.

My inherent fear of the dark means that I don’t often go walking in wilder areas, but the pools of light found in the city offer me refuge in the surrounding darkness and I get by. 

My favorite times to walk are during the full moon or on those cloud covered nights when the city lights are reflected back to earth and night almost turns into day. Then I get the best of both worlds. Shadows still conceal much but the moonlight shows off smaller scenes and highlights.

InstagramFollow Me on Instagram!

Join me on Douglas E. Welch Photography on Facebook


Learn more about black and white photography

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Send a letter! Send a postcard! Beverly Wilshire Hotel via Instagram

January 23rd, 2019 Comments off

What antiques catch your eye (and your lens)? Share in the comments!

Send a letter! Send a postcard! Beverly Wilshire Hotel via Instagram

Send a letter! Send a postcard!

Wandering Rodeo Drive with family a few weeks ago and we HAD to go into the Lobby of the Beverly Wilshire Hotel. After all, this was the hotel portrayed in Pretty Woman and countless other films and tv shows.

For me, though, it wasn’t about the fancy shops or exceedingly rich or famous guests. I was more interested in the design and architecture of the hotel, first built in 1928. 

This gleaming mail chute shines brightly in the elevator lobby and I stopped to take a photo despite the odd looks I received from staff and guests. What can I say? I love things that are well-designed in a style that isn’t seen much anymore. I am sure I have countless other photos like this in my photo collection. 

InstagramFollow Me on Instagram!

Join me on Douglas E. Welch Photography on Facebook


Learn more about mail chutes and their design

† 

Cutler Mail Chute Company at Smithsonian.edu

New York City’s Mail Chutes Are Lovely, Ingenious, and Almost Entirely Ignored

Going Metro Today! via Instagram

January 23rd, 2019 Comments off

Do you ride public transit? Why or Why Not?  Share your thoughts in the comments!

Going Metro Today! via Instagram

Going Metro Today!

While I am riding the bus today out of necessity — the car is in the shop — after using public transit to get around cities like London and Milan, I know there are unique advantages.

Since you don’t have to focus on driving, you notice more along your way — even when traveling in your own neighborhood. Perhaps you spot a new restaurant you want to try or a new shop.

You also get to know your fellow citizens more. The conversations I have on the bus vary widely, but they give you a better and deeper understanding of those who share this time and place with you.

If you have visitors in town, it helps to know how the metro system works so you can give them advice. It might prevent you from having to take them everywhere by car and all the complications of traffic and parking.

Finally, and most importantly for me, I get a little more exercise than I might otherwise. Since I typically have to walk from my house to the bus stop and then from my final stop to my destination traveling by bus provides a little, forced exercise. It is never too much, but just enough to get me moving and helping to fill the activity rings on my iPhone. 😀

Instagram  and Follow

Join me on Douglas E. Welch Photography on Facebook