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TV Worth Watching 2: The Story of Science from BBC (6 parts)

March 31st, 2013 Comments off

TV Worth Watching is a new series highlighting my favorite television viewing. I am a big fan of UK television, so you are sure to see many UK shows and movies featured here. — Douglas

story-of-science

TV Worth Watching: The Story of Science from BBC (6 parts)

I love BBC Documentary and look them up whenever I can. This 6 part series on Science was quite amazing. Unfortunately, I can’t find it on DVD via Amazon — only through this YouTube playlist. Still, it is worth watching to show you the important role that science has played (and plays) in the world.

The Story of Science

For thousands of years we have wrestled with the great questions of existence. Who are we? What is the world made of? How did we get here? The quest to answer these is the story of science.

Each week, medical journalist Michael Mosley traces the often unpredictable path we have taken. From recreating a famous alchemist’s experiment, to following in Galileo’s footsteps, and putting himself in the hands of a hypnotist, Michael unpicks how science has changed the way we see ourselves, and the way we see our world.

It is a tale of courage and of fear, of hope and disaster, of persistence and success. It interweaves great forces of history – revolutions, voyages of discovery and artistic movements – with practical, ingenious inventions and the dogged determination of experimenters and scientists.

This is the story of how history made science and how science made history, and how the ideas which emerged made the modern world. — BBC Web Site

Where to watch:

Previously on TV Worth Watching…

Video: #KitchenParty LIVE: Evi Abeler on Food Photography – Recorded Version

March 28th, 2013 Comments off

 

If you’re like us, then you’re probably obsessed with taking food photos. At BakeSpace we are constantly uploading food pics to our facebookintagram and twitter pages.  However, there isn’t a day that goes by when we don’t stumble upon a photo that simply redefines what’s possible in food porn. How do they do that?

Join us on Thursday, March 28th as we welcome NYC food photographer Evi Abeler ofWhipandClick.com (also follow Evi on G+) to KitchenParty live on Google+. Evi will share with us her 5 favorite tips on taking better food photographs.

Want to share your pictures?

In addition, feel free to share with us your favorite food photos by tweeting to our show with #kitchenparty. We’ll share your photos with Evi and get her feedback.

SHOW AIRS LIVE – THURSDAY, MARCH 28th @ 8PM EST / 5PM PST

HOW TO WATCH THE SHOW: At 8pm Eastern / 5 pm Pacific on Thursday, March 28th, join us here and click on the video that will be added to this page about 20 minutes before the show starts. Follow the conversation on twitter by using #kitchenparty or head over to our G+ page!

NEVER MISS A SHOW or WATCH PAST EPISODES: If you don’t want to miss an episode, subscribe to our google+ account or youtube pages.

FOLLOW #KITCHENPARTY HOSTS:

Our Guest on Twitter: @eviabeler

TV Worth Watching 1: Inspector Montalbano (Il Commissario Montalbano) – Italy

March 27th, 2013 Comments off

TV Worth Watching is a new series highlighting my favorite television viewing. I am a big fan of UK television, so you are sure to see many UK shows and movies featured here. — Douglas

TV Worth Watching: Detective Montalbano (Il Commissario Montalbano) – Italy

 

For our first entry in this series, I figured I would share something that is a little challenging, since it is not in English. All episodes are fully sub-titled, though, so you can still enjoy the series, even if you speak no Italian at all.

We were introduced to Inspector Montalbano by our Sicilian relatives when they took us to visit the city of Modica on our last trip. Modica is the real world stand-in for the city of Vigata where Montalbano is the head of police. When we started watching the series, it was much like watching television shows that are shot here in Los Angeles. We kept spotting locations where we had visited, buildings, churches and more. We also enjoyed seeing the Italian people and hearing the language again on a regular basis.

While we may have some personal connection to the series, Montalbano is also an excellent television show in its own right. The acting and writing is top notch, as is the production. The scripts are all based on the best selling novels by Andrea Camilleri. As much as I might like the English language remakes of various, international detective shows, it is such a pleasure to see (and hear) these stories in their original locations, with their original actors and language. We were so happy to find that it airs locally on Channel 28.4 KCET which is the home of the Mhz Network. Mhz focuses on international entertainment, especially mystery series. There are several other Italian series as well as French series, such as Maigret, which also air on the network.

“Inspector Salvo Montalbano (Italian: Commissario Salvo Montalbano) is a fictional character created by Italian writer Andrea Camilleri in a series of novels and short stories.

The fractious detective’s character and manner encapsulate much of Sicilian mythology and astute detective work. The original books are written in a mixture of Italian, strict Sicilian, and a Sicilianized Italian.

Although the Inspector Montalbano series of novels are staged in the Sicilian context, Camilleri uncompromisingly confronts many contemporary political and social problems. The novels were translated into English by Stephen Sartarelli. The translation of the Montalbano novels started only after five novels had already been published in Italian and gained popularity among the Italian-speaking public. The translator Stephen Sartarelli has attempted to maintain the mixture of Italian and Sicilian dialect in the dialogues. In addition, he has added notes at the end of each of the novels, which give short explanations regarding many of the peculiarities of Sicilian and Italian society depicted in the novels.

The name Montalbano is a homage to the Spanish writer Manuel Vázquez Montalbán; the similarities between Montalbán’s Pepe Carvalho and Camilleri’s fictional detective are remarkable. Both writers make great play of their protagonists’ gastronomic preferences.[1]
Inspector Montalbano is an engaging hero – honest, decent and loyal. He has his own way of doing things, and his superiors regard him as something of a loose cannon. One of the strengths of the novels is Montalbano’s ability to navigate through a murky world, a world of shady connections and favours owed and owing, without compromising himself beyond what he can live with. There is a great deal of humor in his character, but the subtext is hard criticism of the social and political situation of both the Sicilian and Italian contexts. In fact, Camilleri has said that social commentary “…was always my aim. In many crime novels, the events seem completely detached from the economic, political and social context in which they occur. […] In my books, I deliberately decided to smuggle into a detective novel a critical commentary on my times. This also allowed me to show the progression and evolution in the character of Montalbano.” [2]

As the head of the Vigàta police precinct, Montalbano is balancing between the demands of his superiors and the realities of local crime and life in general. In fact, a determining factor of his success as a Sicilian policeman seems to be his ability to bridge between different cultures. There is the “northern” force, coming from Milan that attempts to standardize regulations and increase transparency. On the opposite side is the particularistic “southern” culture with complex webs of relationships that affect the way things are done. Montalbano excels at balancing between these two, while being true to his principles. [3]” — Wikipedia

Where to watch:

More information on Inspector Montalbano: 

Recipes in Rotation: BBQ Turkey Meatloaf

March 26th, 2013 Comments off

Rnr logoRecipes in Rotation is a series that allows me to highlight recipes that have made their way into “the book.” This book is the binder that contains recipes we make on a regular basis — at least monthly and in some cases, every two weeks. I keep them in this special binder for quick and easy access without sorting through a bunch of other recipes to speed things up when I need to get dinner on the table.

My latest cookbook, Recipes in Rotation, is now available from Bakespace’s Cookbook Cafe iPad app and web site. This contains 15 recipes first seen in the Recipes in Rotation series here on My Word with Douglas E. Welch. The cookbook is available for free.

Today’s recipe is a BBQ Turkey Meatloaf

When we were first married, meatloaf was a staple meal for my wife and I. That said, we never hit on a recipe that we really liked, so meatloaf fell out of rotation for a long time. As we switched from ground beef to ground turkey as our main, regular, protein, we looked for recipes again, but it wasn’t until a year or so ago that we happened across this recipe. Our first attempt worked well and it was quickly added into the regular rotation of meals in the house.

The plentiful sauce means it works well with ground turkey, which can have issues with dryness when making a meatloaf. The BBQ sauce helps everything stay moist and provides a nice sauce with the finished dish, as well.

Bbq meatloaf

BBQ Turkey Meatloaf

(See this recipe on Bakespace.com)

Ingredients

  • 1.25-1.5 pounds ground beef or turkey
  • 1 cup Italian seasoned bread crumbs
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • pinch red pepper flakes
  • pinch cayenne pepper
  • 1 – 14oz cans tomato sauce
  • 3 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 1/4 cup light brown sugar, packed
  • 2 tablespoons yellow mustard
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly coat an 11×7 baking dish with cooking spray.

Mix together the beef or turkey, bread crumbs, onion powder, egg, salt, pepper, and 1/2 c. of the tomato sauce. Form mixture into a loaf and place into prepared baking dish.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the rest of the tomato sauce, vinegar, sugar, mustard, and Worcestershire sauce. Pour the sauce over the meatloaf.

Bake for 1 hour, basting every 15 minutes or so with the pan juices.

More meatloaf recipes:

Previously in Recipes in Rotation:

Categories: Cooking, Food, Recipe, Recipes in Rotation Tags:

Places LA: What a treehouse!

March 26th, 2013 Comments off

You’re never quite sure what you are going to find when you drive around Los Angeles and today was no exception. Near my favorite coffee bar I happened across this amazing treehouse on the corner of an otherwise quiet San Fernando Valley street. Is it a set for a movie or TV show? I didn’t notice the PAR lights on the foreground tree when I took the picture, but the treehouse is obviously lit up for some reason. I don’t know how it would have ever been approved otherwise. Anybody know the story behind this treehouse?

Places LA: What a treehouse!

Books on Hold: The Drunken Botanist: The plants that create the world’s great drinks

March 23rd, 2013 Comments off

Books on Hold is a blog series dedicated to books I have seen in passing and requested from my local library. See more in the series at the end of this blog post. — Douglas

The drunken botanist : the plants that create the world’s great drinks

From Amazon.com…

“Sake began with a grain of rice. Scotch emerged from barley, tequila from agave, rum from sugarcane, bourbon from corn. Thirsty yet? In The Drunken Botanist, Amy Stewart explores the dizzying array of herbs, flowers, trees, fruits, and fungi that humans have, through ingenuity, inspiration, and sheer desperation, contrived to transform into alcohol over the centuries.

Of all the extraordinary and obscure plants that have been fermented and distilled, a few are dangerous, some are downright bizarre, and one is as ancient as dinosaurs—but each represents a unique cultural contribution to our global drinking traditions and our history.
This fascinating concoction of biology, chemistry, history, etymology, and mixology—with more than fifty drink recipes and growing tips for gardeners—will make you the most popular guest at any cocktail party.”

Previously in Books on Hold:

Categories: Books, Garden Tags:

#KitchenParty Live: Kitchen Spring Cleaning with Alejandra Ramos, AlwaysOrderDessert.com – Recorded Version

March 21st, 2013 Comments off

 

Spring is here! It’s time to start thinking about your kitchen spring cleaning. Join us Thursday March 21st for the next #KitchenParty live on Google+.  This week we’ll be chatting with one of our favorite New York City food bloggers Alejandra Ramos of AlwaysOrderDessert.com. She will share her grocery tips on making food last longer, tips on organizing the pantry, how to prep for easy cooking during the week, how to store veggies, and much more!

SHOW AIRS LIVE – THURSDAY, MARCH 21st @ 8PM EST / 5PM PST

HOW TO WATCH THE SHOW: At 8pm Eastern / 5 pm Pacific on Thursday, March 14th,  join us here and click on the video that will be added to this page about 20 minutes before the show starts. Follow the conversation on twitter by using #kitchenparty or head over to Youtube.com/bakespacetv page.

NEVER MISS A SHOW: If you don’t want to miss an episode, subscribe to our google+ account or youtube pages.

FOLLOW #KITCHENPARTY HOSTS:

Jobs Available – Listings at Jobs.WelchWrite.com – Search by keyword and location

March 20th, 2013 Comments off
Categories: Careers, Special Tags:

Recipes in Rotation: Cookbook Cafe Cookbook now available!

March 19th, 2013 Comments off

Rnr logoRecipes in Rotation is a series that allows me to highlight recipes that have made their way into “the book.” This book is the binder that contains recipes we make on a regular basis — at least monthly and in some cases, every two weeks. I keep them in this special binder for quick and easy access without sorting through a bunch of other recipes to speed things up when I need to get dinner on the table.

Rnr cookbook final

My latest cookbook, Recipes in Rotation, is now available from Bakespace’s Cookbook Cafe iPad app and web site. This contains 15 recipes first seen in the Recipes in Rotation series here on My Word with Douglas E. Welch. The cookbook is available for free.

You can download the Cookbook Cafe iPad app from the iTunes App Store  and then “buy” the cookbook from within the app or access the cookbook directly from the Bakespace.com web site.

Recipes in Rotation are the recipes we use most frequently here at our house. These recipes are in a special notebook that is always close at hand. While we often try to add new food to our family rotation (See the New Food series, also here on My Word), these are the standards we return to again and again.

Recipes in Rotation joins my previous 2 cookbooks for Cookbook Cafe:

Making cookies Sharing christmas with friends

I’m Making Cookies | Sharing Christmas with Friends

Previously in Recipes in Rotation:

Categories: Baking, Cooking, Food, Recipe, Recipes in Rotation Tags:

Video: Places LA: Grand Park in Downtown Los Angeles Photo Slide Show

March 17th, 2013 Comments off
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