Valley Carpenter Bee (female) (Xylocopa varipuncta) [Video] (1 minute, 38 seconds)

Valley Carpenter Bee (female) (Xylocopa varipuncta)

Valley Carpenter Bee (female) (Xylocopa varipuncta)

A female Valley Carpenter Bees (Xylocopa varipuncta) feeds on Mexican sage in my garden a few days ago. I was out working to clear up a mass of grass and weeds caused by the rainy year we have had when I spotted her nearly in my face. I took a break and watched for quite a while she fed.

This sage was a recent addition to the garden, specifically for use by bees and hummingbirds, so it is great to see it being put to use.

From Wikipedia

Xylocopa varipuncta, the valley carpenter bee, is one of three species of carpenter bee found from western New Mexico to northern California.[1] Females are a metallic black while males are fuzzy and gold with green eyes. They are the largest bees found in California,[2] growing to around 1 inch (2.5 cm) in length.

A distinguishing characteristic that uniquely separates X. varipuncta from other species of bees is their ability to thermoregulate. This allows them to fly at very high temperatures without overheating and at low temperatures without freezing.[3] By modifying their foraging patterns and flying between different altitudes depending upon temperature, the valley carpenter bee is able to adapt to very different environments through predisposed behavioral patterns.[3]


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Iris on Cal Poly Pomona Campus via Instagram

What is blooming in your garden? Leave a comment and share!

Iris on Cal Poly Pomona Campus

A lovely bit of Spring as I walked around campus a few weeks ago. The contrast of the bright yellow against the dark@green leaves really made them pop. This great bloom is probably another result of our good winter rains this year. 

Iris on Cal Poly Pomona Campus via Instagram

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Historical Garden Books: The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White – 35 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White – 35 in a Series

Historical Garden Books:  The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White - 35  in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books:  The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White - 35  in a Series

Historical Garden Books:  The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White - 35  in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books:  The principles of floriculture (1915) by Edward Albert White - 35  in a Series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org

PREFACE

INSTRUCTION in flower-growing has been given in American educational institutions for many years. Early in its history such instruction was a part of the curriculum of general horticulture, lectures in floriculture being given by those engaged in teaching other branches.

Within the last ten years there has been, a breaking up of general horticultural instruction. Separate departments of pomology, market-gardening, and floriculture have been created, and each is supervised by one who devotes his entire time to his special subject.

Floricultural education, as a distinct and separate department, is, therefore, of comparatively recent origin. Because of this, there are few precedents, and the courses given have resulted from the experiences of comparatively few men. The material here presented has been compiled largely from the author’s lectures. The book is, therefore, the outgrowth of experience and general observations. Branches of the subject which seemed unimportant, and methods of teaching which proved ineffective, have been eliminated, and only those phases retained which have appeared to meet the needs of students.

In the author’s experience in teaching distinctly floricultural subjects, he has felt the need of a text-book. There are good books on special topics but no one work that treats of the general principles of flower-growing.

The purpose of the author has been, therefore, to consider the principles that underlie the successful culture of ornamental plants and to present them in such a way that the book may be useful in the classroom. It is also hoped that it may be of service in a useful way to practical men.

Illustrative material has been chosen largely from those subjects which the author has found to be helpful in his own work. It is expected that it will be supplemented by lantern slides and photographs illustrating the results of applications of the principles herein contained.

The author appreciates deeply the interest taken in this work by men engaged in various floricultural occupations and their hearty response to his requests for information regarding various details of the business. He is indebted also to his colleagues in Cornell University who have read the manuscript and have made suggestions for increasing its usefulness.

E. A. WHITE.

DEPARTMENT OF FLORICULTURE,
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AT CORNELL UNIVERSITY,
ITHACA, N.Y.
April 1, 1915.

More information on this book:

Publication date 1915
Topics Floriculture
Publisher New York, The Macmillan company
Collection cdlamericana
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Language English
 
 
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Flowering Now: Brunfelsia (Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow) via Instagram

What is your favorite flower color? Leave a comment and share!

Flowering Now: Brunfelsia (Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow) via Instagram

Brunfelsia (Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow)

More blooms this week with these brunfelsia. These were on the property when we bought it 23 years ago and I loved them so much I planted 2 more last year in a different area. 

Each bloom progresses from blue to purple to white as it ages, giving rise to its common name. 


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Flowering Now: Daffodils 2019 via Instagram

What is your favorite sign of Spring? Leave a comment and share!

Daffodils 2019 via Instagram

This year’s normal rainfall has made everything jump in the garden, including the weeds, and these daffodils look amazing. They are always a great harbinger of Spring even if they do mean hotter weather is coming. 


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Flowering Now: Gerbera Daisy in the Garden via Instagram

What is your favorite flower? Leave a comment and share!

It is always a welcome surprise to see these Gerbera Daisies popping up in the garden. They were originally decorations from a close friends memorial service and each time they appear they remind me of him. A great way to keep someone in your memories year after year. 

Flowering Now: Gerbera Daisy in the Garden via Instagram


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Flowering Now: Clivia Blooms in the Garden via Instagram

What is your favorite flower? Leave a comment and share!

I bought these clivia on discount last Fall and now they are blooming in the garden. I am sure the large amount of rain we received has helped but it great to have some color in this shady part of the garden. 

Flowering Now: Clivia Blooms in the Garden via Instagram


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Historical Garden Books: Guide to the conservatory (1842) by Richard Bainbridge – 34 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of 

Historical Garden Books: Guide to the conservatory (1842) by Richard Bainbridge – 34 in a Series

Historical Garden Books:  Guide to the conservatory (1842) by by Richard  Bainbridge  - 34  in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books:  Guide to the conservatory (1842) by by Richard  Bainbridge  - 34  in a Series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org

PREFACE.

An introduction to a book may be so far useful as it may serve to explain the writer’s design, and en- able the reader to pass a fair judgment upon his performance ; for unless his particular view be well understood and considered, it is possible that he may be rashly censured for disappointing those hopes which he could not have fulfilled without de- parting from his plan. One or two observations, however, will, in the present instance, be sufficient to apprize the reader what he may expect from this publication. It is intended, then, merely as a Guide to the Greenhouse and Conservatory ; con- taining, in as concise a manner as possible, those necessary directions for keeping up a succession of bloom during every month of the year ; so that the Conservatory may never be wanting in a display of that beauty and loveliness which ever adorns the vernal season, and renders its name, Spring, so pe- culiarly and gracefully appropriate.

The Author’s next object is, to place within the reach of every student of the science of Floricul- ture, an easy and practical treatise on a select list of the most choice and admired plants of the pre- sent day ; so as to enable him to pursue his studies with pleasure, ease, and perspicuity, that he may fulfil the several departments of his office, without encumbering his time with those experiments ne- cessary to the attainment of so valuable a know- ledge. If the humble efforts of the Author’s pen have accomplished this end, he will feel himself richly compensated, in being enabled to contribute to the advancing of one step towards the acquisition of useful knowledge. At the same time, he begs to tender his heartfelt thanks to those useful cultiva- tors of Horticultural and Floricultural science who have so kindly aided him in his arduous task ; especially in furnishing him with the valuable in- formation given on the treatment of several par- ticular plants.

More information on this book:

Publication date 1842
Publisher London, R. Baldwin
Digitizing sponsor The Library of Congress
Language English
 
 
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White Orchids via Instagram

What is your favorite orchid? Leave a comment and share!

White Orchids

Orchids used to be exceedingly rare but now you can buy gorgeous ones at almost any grocery store. Knudsen and Wimber discovered the secrets of orchid growing and cloning and made these incredibly beautiful, of strange looking, plants available to everyone. 

Learn more


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Guns to shovels: Oakland activists melt deadly weapons into garden tools via City Farmer News