Geranium flowers in the sun via Instagram

Geranium flowers in the sun

Geranium flowers in the sun via Instagram

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First Daffodils 2021 via Instagram

First Daffodils 2021

First Daffodils 2021 via Instagram

I have been watching these for almost a week and them suddenly they bloomed today. Beautiful.

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Waiting on the rain via TikTok [Video]

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Waiting on the rain

♬ original sound – Douglas E. Welch

Waiting on the rain via TikTok [Video]

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Vintage Botanical Prints – 31 in a series – “A Bouquet of Flowers” from Leaf and Flower Pictures (1859)

Vintage Botanical Prints – 31 in a series – “A Bouquet of Flowers” from Leaf and Flower Pictures (1859)

Vintage Botanical Prints - 31 in a series -

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from Leaf and Flower Pictures (1859)

 

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Ctkr x2200 front black c 250 163 1000 1000 bg f8f8f8Mug travel x1000 center pad 1000x1000 f8f8f8Gptr 1400x front black c 188 133 1000 1000 bg f8f8f8 1



Bi-color daffodils in the garden via Instagram

Bi-color daffodils in the garden

Bi-color daffodils in the garden via Instagram

I don’t remember planting these, but like all bulbs, they are always a pleasant surprise.

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Leucojum (Snowflakes) in my Los Angeles garden via TikTok [Video]

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Leucojum (Snowflakes) in my Los Angeles garden. ##garden ##leucojum ##snowflakes ##flowers ##bulbs ##AGardenersNotebook ##plants.

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Leucojum (Snowflakes) in my Los Angeles garden via TikTok [Video]

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Azalea flowers hit their peak via Instagram

Azalea flowers hit their peak

Azalea flowers hit their peak

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Historical Seed Catalogs – 94 in a series – Peonies and iris (1910) by Peterson Nursery

Historical Seed Catalogs – 94 in a series – Peonies and iris (1910) by Peterson Nursery

Historical Seed Catalogs - 94 in a series - Peonies and iris (1910) by Peterson Nursery

Historical Seed Catalogs - 94 in a series - Peonies and iris (1910) by Peterson Nursery

Historical Seed Catalogs - 94 in a series - Peonies and iris (1910) by Peterson Nursery

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, Torrent from Archive.org

Tke Herbaceous Peony

The herbaceous peony of today stands unchallenged as the most popular of hardy plants, and its friends who know its possibilities and its many good qualities are willing to back it against all comers as the best and most beau- tful flower that grows. Its popularity has increased by leaps and bounds in the United States during the last two decades since the new improved varieties have been developed and become known. There are at present some 2,000 varie- ties of Japanese, French, Dutch, English and American ori- gin; the public has been quick to appreciate the improved vari- eties, and demand the best; till now it holds full sway during June, which is becoming rather the month of peonies than of roses.

Peonies range in color from cream and purest white through the various shades of pink, lilac, rose and red to the deepest carmine, purple and maroon, in every possible combination) of shade and form. Size varies from four to eight inches in diameter. IMost of them have a delightful fragrance.

Culture

This is one of the strong points. Nothing is easier to grow. As contrasted with the rose, chrysanthemum, and carnation, which can be perfected only under the skillful care of the expert florist, the peony needs but to be put into good, rich soil and left alone,-, where for eight, ten or even twenty years it will increase in size and beauty each year. If given a mulch of manure in the late fall, which is left on all winter, the added enrichment of the soil will perhaps yield more and better blooms, but it is not needed as a protection. They are remarkably free from disease.

When dormant in early fall they can be shipped long dis- tances without injury. It is possible to transplant and ship them in the spring, but we do not recommend it, as they then undergo a severe set-back, andl do not bloom as freely for several years. The very best time is September, and that is when we begin filling orders.

They should be planted with eyes two to tHrae inches below the surface and the ground pressed firmly about the roots. They can be divided as small as desired, so long as each piece has at least one good strong eye on a piece of tuber.


SEE MORE:

Publication date 1910
Topics Nursery stock Illinois Chicago CatalogsFlowers CatalogsPlants, Ornamental Catalogs
Publisher Chicago, Ill. : Wm. A. Peterson
Collection usda-nurseryandseedcatalogusdanationalagriculturallibrarybiodiversityfedlinkamericana
Digitizing sponsor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Contributor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Language English
Volume 1910

 


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Flowering Now: Abutilon flowers in the garden via Instagram

Flowering Now: Abutilon flowers in the garden via Instagram

Flowering Now: Abutilon flowers in the garden via Instagram

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Dazzling Dahlias – 59 in a series – Superior Dahlia Gardens Catalog (1921)

Dazzling Dahlias – 59 in a series – Superior Dahlia Gardens Catalog (1921)

Dazzling Dahlias - 59 in a series - Superior Dahlia Gardens Catalog (1921)

Dazzling Dahlias - 59 in a series - Superior Dahlia Gardens Catalog (1921)

 

History of the Dahlia

The DAHLIA is a native of Mexico, and before the invasion by Cortez was grown by the Azetcs. It was named in honor of Professor Andrew Dahl, a Swedish Botanist, and was first cultivated in Europe about 130 years ago. Dahlia variabilis, the forerunner of the common or show Dahlia, was single in its wild state, the first perfectly double flower being obtained by M. Dankelaar of the Botanical Gardens of Belgium in 1814; from this source came the well-known double varieties so common in the gardens of the East half a century ago. Dahlia Juarezi, the original Cactus Dahlia, was named after a former President of Mexico and was found in Jux- phaor, Mexico, in 1872 by J. T. Vanderberg, and sent by him to an English florist, who exhibited it in England in 1882. Its graceful form and brilliant color at once captured the fancy of flower lovers, and today there is no flower more popular. The progeny of Dahlia Juarezi not only “broke” into various colors, but different shapes as well. It was by selecting the most desirable of these and reselecting the finest from each succeeding generation of plants, that the Castus Dahlia has arrived at its present state of perfection. Pompon forms appeared about 1858-1860 ; next came the decorative type, which is about 40 years old, and most recently the Hybrid Cactus and the Peony class, which dates back but a few years and have become very popular. Indeed, the marvelous transformation wrought in this wonderful flower in the past 36 years reads more like a tale from Arabian Nights than actual reality.

The Culture of the Dahlia

SUCCESS WILL FOLLOW IF YOU OBSERVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS

Location. — The Dahlia is not as particular as most of our flowers, and will succeed under a great many adverse conditions. There are, however, certain locations where Dahlias seem to outdo themselves. An open, sunny location seems to favor them at all times. Dahlias do well on high or low lands, on hillsides or perfectly level land, giving good results in each location. Many varieties do well in partial shade, producing fully as good flowers as they do in the hot sun, especially for exhibition purposes.

Dahlias will grow and do equally well in any kind of soil, sand, gravel, heavy and light loam. In sand and gravel they form a short, sturdy, compact plant, and in heavy loam and low land they grow tall and rank, blossoming about a week later than those planted at the same time in sandy soil.

Preparation. — The soil should be thoroughly cultivated, 8 to 10 inches deep, well pulverized and thoroughly worked over. To secure exceptional results, have your soil spaded in the fall, or as early as practicable in the spring; then, just before planting, have spaded again. Fertilizer. — Fertilization is one of the most important factors, to be successful with Dahlias. We all know that the Dahlia requires and takes from the soil certain properties; and in order to keep the soil in correct proportion, the materials the Dahlia takes from the soil must be restored. You can use dressing (either horse, cow, sheep or hen) or chemicals.

The manure restores the properties necessary, and makes the soil light and mellow, keeps it from being heavy and caking, while lime has the same tendency and keeps the soil sweet.

An application of manur (either in liquid or ordinary form) several times throughout the growing season proves very beneficial, furnishing new material for the growing plants and insuring you the very best results.

Time of Planting. — The time for planting Dahlias varies according to the locality. Dahlias can be planted any time after danger of frost is over, and under ordinary conditions will blossom in from 6 to 8 weeks after they have been planted. It is always best ta wait until the ground becomes thoroughly warmed.

Planting. — Plant bulbs in hills, laying flat down, 6 inches deep. Do not stand the bulb on end. If you! stand the bulg on end, having the sprout near the top of the ground, all the new bulbs which form will grow near the top of the ground and when you have a dry spell your plant becomes stunted; whereas, if the bulbs were planted flat down, 6 inches deep, no matter how dry the season, the bulbs would receive sufficient moisture to keep them growing. If planting with manure, cover manure an inch or so before planting bulbs; fertilizer should be thoroughly worked into the soil. Either fertilizer or manure will burn the sprout; be sure to cover with soil.

By planting the bulb first, then covering an inch or so with soil and applying your fertilizer or manure, your plant receives the entire benefit of the dressing.



Dahlias: Beautiful Varieties for Home & Garden




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