Historical Seed Catalogs: Choice flower seeds (1898) – 7 in a series

Archive.org has a host of old seed catalogs (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

I love the artwork I find in these catalogs. They range from the austere to the fanciful to the comic — as with these Brownies plants and harvesting the flowers they selected. They stand alone as little artworks all by themselves.

Historical Seed Catalogs: Choice flower seeds (1898) – 7 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs:  Choice flower seeds (1898) - 7 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs:  Choice flower seeds (1898) - 7 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs:  Choice flower seeds (1898) - 7 in a series

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FOR THE STORY OF THE BROWNIES.

My 1898 Greeting! Cash Prizes

My artist (another woman) has given you, this year, three pictures of the Brownies, viz.: (1) the front cover page, (2) this page and (3) the back cover page, and into these pic- tures, in this order, she has woven a little story, in the right reading of which by my patrons I am very much interested. And so I offer the prizes following for the best interpretation of this story.

More information on this catalog:

Publication date 1898
Publisher Minneapolis, Minn. : E.V. White
Digitizing sponsor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Contributor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Language English
Volume 1898
 
Learn more about gardening history with these books

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Garden Decor: Wattle Edging and Fences

I’ve always loved the look of wattle fencing. It is a bit time consuming to build yourself, but it is an excellent way of using on-site materials to brighten yo your garden or homestead. All it takes are some sticks and time. — Douglas

Wattle Garden Edging

You’ll find more example of wattle fencing and edging — along with some instruction — over at Insteading.com

Wattle

Wattle Information from Wikipedia

Wattle is a lightweight construction material made by weaving thin branches (either whole, or more usually split) or slats between upright stakes to form a woven lattice. It has commonly been used to make fences and hurdles for enclosing ground or handling livestock. The wattle may be made as loose panels, slotted between timber framing to make infill panels, or it may be made in place to form the whole of a fence or wall. The technique goes back to Neolithic times.

It forms the substructure of wattle and daub, a composite building material used for making walls, in which wattle is daubed with a sticky material usually made of some combination of wet soil, clay, sand, animal dung and straw. Wattle and daub has been used for at least 6,000 years, and is still an important construction material in many parts of the world. This process is similar to modern lath and plaster, a common building material for wall and ceiling surfaces, in which a series of nailed wooden strips are covered with plaster smoothed into a flat surface. Many historic buildings include wattle and daub construction, and the technique is becoming popular again in more developed areas as a low-impact sustainable building technique

Read more

See more wattle examples on Pinterest

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Historical Garden Books: Wood and garden; notes and thoughts, practical and critical, of a working amateur (1910) by Gertrude Jekyll, 1843-1932 – 17 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of 

Historical Garden Books: Wood and garden; notes and thoughts, practical and critical, of a working amateur (1910)
by Gertrude Jekyll, 1843-1932 – 17 in a Series

Woodgardennotest01jeky 0001Historical Garden Books: Wood and garden; notes and thoughts, practical and critical, of a working amateur (1910)
by Gertrude Jekyll, 1843-1932 - 17 in a Series

Historical Garden Books: Wood and garden; notes and thoughts, practical and critical, of a working amateur (1910)
by Gertrude Jekyll, 1843-1932 - 17 in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books: Wood and garden; notes and thoughts, practical and critical, of a working amateur (1910)
by Gertrude Jekyll, 1843-1932 - 17 in a Series

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PREFACE

From its simple nature, this book seems scarcely to need any prefatory remarks, with the exception only of certaui acknowledgments.

A portion of the contents (about one-third) appeared during the years 1896 and 1897 in the pages of the Guardian, as ” Notes from Garden and Woodland.” I am indebted to the courtesy of the editor and proprietors of that journal for permission to republish these notes.

The greater part of the photographs from which the illustrations have been prepared were done on my own ground — a space of some fifteen acres. Some of them, owing to my want of technical ability as a photographer, were very weak, and have only been rendered available by the skill of the reproducer, for whose careful work my thanks are due.

A small number of the photographs were done for reproduction in wood-engraving for Mr. Robinson’s Garden, Gardening Illustrated, and English Flower Garden. I have his kind permission to use the original plates.

I also owe my thanks to several friends, and especially to Canon EUacombe and the Rev. C. Wolley Dod, for the correction of a number of errors and inaccuracies in botanical nomenclature that appeared in the first and second editions.

G. J.

More information on this book:

Publication date 1910
Topics Gardening
Publisher London, New York, Longmans, Green
Digitizing sponsor The Library of Congress
Language English

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Flowering Now: Cactus Flowers

Flowering Now: Cactus Flowers

Flowering Now: Cactus Flowers

We were greeted with these blooms after returning from our trip to Milan.

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Want to learn more about succulents? Check out these books for your local library and Amazon.com!

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
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Historical Seed Catalogs: Leonard’s seeds / Leonard Seed Company (1916) – 6 in a series

Archive.org has a host of old seed catalogs (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Seed Catalogs: Leonard’s seeds / Leonard Seed Company (1916) – 6 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Leonard's seeds / Leonard Seed Company (1916) - 6 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: Leonard's seeds / Leonard Seed Company (1916) - 6 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Leonard's seeds / Leonard Seed Company (1916) - 6 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: Leonard's seeds / Leonard Seed Company (1916) - 6 in a series

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LEONARD’S RETAIL CATALOGUE

WE RESPECTFULLY SUBMIT THE FOLLOWING SUGGESTIONS FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION:

1. That a larger vegetable diet instead of much meat possibly might be of bene- fit to your health and that of your family.

2. Tbat a diet of vegetables is more economical than a meat diet.

3. That the kitchen garden is the surest way of securing fresh vegetables, as the purchased vegetable is most frequently old and inferior.

4. That if you do not plant your yard and care for it, the weeds will grow and become ugly and offensive.

5. That you plant your vegetables in long rows instead of little beds and do without stooping, the work of six hoes with our wheeled garden cultivator.

6. That the work of making a garden is as healthful a physical exercise as golf and as mentally stimulating as chess, the work for ladies and gentlemen.

7. That no house can be complete in its setting without well-kept gardens, lawns and flowers.

8. That no place can possibly be mean that has about it gardens, lawns, and flowers grown from our vegetable, grass and flower seed.

9. THAT THE LEONARD SEED COMPANY ARE SEED GROWERS.

10. THAT THE LEONARD SEED COMPANY SELLS SEED IN BULK ONLY. SEED THAT IS FRESH AND TESTED. THEY DO NOT HANDLE OLD AND RETURNED, COMMISSION SEED.

11. THAT THE PRICE OF LEONARD SEED COMPANY’S BULK SEED IS AS REASONABLE AS GOOD SEED CAN BE SOLD.

12. That you buy at once before some varieties of seed, made scarce by the war and bad climatic conditions, be exhausted.

More information on this catalog:

Publication date 1916
Publisher Chicago, Ill. : Leonard Seed Company
Digitizing sponsor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Contributor U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Language English
Volume 1916
 
 
Learn more about gardening history with these books

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Historical Garden Books: The retir’d gard’ner by François Gentil,; Louis Liger (Reprint and translation, Original 1706) – 16 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of 

Historical Garden Books: The retir’d gard’ner by François Gentil,; Louis Liger (Reprint and translation, Original 1706) – 16 in a Series

Historical Garden Books: The retir'd gard'ner by François Gentil,; Louis Liger (Reprint and translation, Original 1706) - 16 in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books: The retir'd gard'ner by François Gentil,; Louis Liger (Reprint and translation, Original 1706) - 16 in a Series

Historical Garden Books: The retir'd gard'ner by François Gentil,; Louis Liger (Reprint and translation, Original 1706) - 16 in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books: The retir'd gard'ner by François Gentil,; Louis Liger (Reprint and translation, Original 1706) - 16 in a Series

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The Retir’d Gard’ner.

In Two Volumes.

Vol. I.

Being a Translation of Le Jardinier Solitaire or Dialogues between a Gentleman and a Gard’ner : Containing the Methods of Making, Ordering and Improving a Fruit and Kitchin-Garden, with many New Experiments, from the Second Edition Printed at Taris.

More information on this book:

Publication date 1982
Publisher New York : Garland Pub.
Collection americana
Digitizing sponsor Google
Book from the collections of University of Michigan
Language EnglishFrench
Volume 1

Learn more about gardening history with these books

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Orto Botanico di Brera/Brera Botanic Garden via Instagram

Orto Botanico di Brera/Brera Botanic Garden

Only one of the many photos I took in this 250-year-old Garden which includes 2 original ginkgo biloba trees. via Instagram

 

How to Propagate Succulents via Gardening Gone Wild

How to Propagate Succulents via Gardening Gone Wild

Ever wondered how to propagate a certain succulent? For example, lithops (living stones)…is it possible to take cuttings from those thick, molar-shaped leaves? How about ruffled echeverias…can a solitary rosette be made to offset? And stacked crassulas…what do you do when stems are tightly lined with leaves? 

Most succulents can be propagated vegetatively—via stem cuttings, pulling apart offsets, or rooting leaves. To the novice, of course, such tasks are mystifying. How deep, for example, does one plant a leaf? 

Read How to Propagate Succulents via Gardening Gone Wild


Want to learn more about succulents? 

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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Yellow Peppers at the Farmers Market via Instagram

Yellow Peppers at the Farmers Market via Instagram

Yellow Peppers at the Farmers Market

Another trip to the Farmers Market this week and another batch of wonderful produce pictures. 

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Want to earn more about vegetable gardening? Check these books out at your local library or buy from Amazon!

 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Historical Garden Books: The Cottage Gardener – Collection of Weekly Newsletters (1849) – 15 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of 

Historical Garden Books: The Cottage Gardener – Collection of Weekly Newsletters (1849) – 15 in a Series

Cottagegardener651lond 0005Cottagegardener651lond 0007

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TO OUR READERS.

“Ladies and Gentlemen” we are to be together for six months’ said the captain of an outward-bound East Indiaman; “let us be pleased with each other during that time.” Now, no voyage could be more delightful than was the one of which that brief address was the preface : let it be ours, then, at the commencement of a new volume — our six months’ voyage . and we have a good hope, when it closes, that our passengers will agree to a memorial, as in the voyage alluded to, thanking ” the captain, officers, and crew, for their uniform urbanity and good conduct.” Such a memorial is doubly gratifying, for it rewards past efforts, and is an earnest of future success; — it is an evidence that the same passengers will sail \nth you again, and that they will recommend the craft to their friends. As we are beginning a new, so we are just closing one of our six months’ voyages; and most gratefully do we add that it has been prosperous. That it has been pleasant to our passengers that prosperity is a silent testimony; but we have recorded evidence, also, in many letters — such as we have before quoted in former volumes — and we must give extracts from two of them now.

One, from a young gardener, says, — ” My garden has been a complete mass of flowers, while the gardens around looked comparatively barren. I have had several brother professionals asking my advice and among them my old master. The advice I gave hun was the advice I have given to all — Read The Cottage Gardener. My old master laughed at such advice, saying such principles and secrets as I practised were not taught in books; but I soon convinced him of his mistake, by shewing him the volumes, and comparing my garden with them. I am happy to say that he is now a constant subscriber.”

The next letter is from a lady, and it thus concludes: — ” I must add my mite of thanks for your most useful periodical, which, from an indolent country girl, has converted me into an active gardener, delighting in my flowers, and not scorning hard work — at which my husband marvels.” Now, some such young lady as our correspondent was before she read The Cottage Gardener, was another young lady on board the ship we have mentioned; and we remember her asking the captain whether he should have a new band of musicians next voyage. He replied in the negative, but that “they would have a good supply of new music.”

Precisely so \nth our musicians. We retain the old — have added one or two more; and we are quite confident that our readers will agree that they all ” discourse most excellent music.” They harmonise well; have abundance of new themes, and we pledge ourselves that they shall keep good time.

More information on this book:

Publication date 1849
Publisher [London : W.S. Orr
Digitizing sponsor UMass Amherst Libraries
Contributor UMass Amherst Libraries
Language English
Volume v.6 1851

Learn more about gardening history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
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