Gerbera Daisy In the Garden Today

Gerbera Daisy In the Garden Today

Gerbera Daisy In the Garden Today

These daisies were flowers from a friend’s memorial services and I love how they remind us of him every time they bloom.

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Noted: 10 Garden Ideas to Steal from London – Gardenista

More great ideas on how to dress up your garden, no matter how large or small — Douglas

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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Gazania in the Sun

Gazania in the Sun

Gazania in the Sun

Shining brightly in the midday sun, these flowers put in a vibrant show.

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Fortnight Lily (Dietes)

Dietes

Fortnight Lily (Dietes)

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Noted: The Best 23 DIY Ideas to Make Garden Stairs and Steps

Adding DIY steps and stairs to your garden or yard is a great way to enhance your outdoor landscaping whether they are perfectly flat or happen to sit in a slope. On the other hand, stairs on a garden offers ease of access to go from one level to another and serve as a walkway as well. Garden stairs are less formal than indoor stairs, so you don’t need to follow precise measurements and you can DIY them according to your likes and the theme of the garden. The most popular material for building stairs is the stone. Stone steps and stairs look natural and free forming. Besides the natural stone, rustic wood, concrete blocks and railway sleepers as well as bricks are also ideal materials to construct the garden steps. Browse below ideas and choose your favorite one to boost the garden.

Hosta Flowers

Hosta flowers

Hosta Flowers

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Noted: Gardening 101: Tulip – Gardenista

All about Tulips
 
 
In The Black Tulip by Alexandre Dumas (the father of the more famous Dumas who wrote The Count of Monte Cristo), an entire town in the Netherlands is struck by tulip mania. An enormous prize is offered to any grower who can procure a truly black tulip. Indeed, the Dutch were well known for tulip worship, and rare tulip bulbs sold for prices equivalent to thousands of dollars in Amsterdam’s storied flower district. Though tulips are no longer valued as jewels (though perhaps they should be?) these members of the lily family still appear in luminous colors, with large and bright globes floating on improbably thin and graceful stems, looking like museum-quality baubles from ancient empires.
 
Read Gardening 101: Tulip – Gardenista via Gardenista

Learn more about tulips with these books

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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Bees and Rosemary — A Minute in the Garden 58 from A Gardener’s Notebook [Video] (1:00)

A Minute in the Garden: A series from A Gardener’s Notebook

Industrious bees work in the sun at Arlington Garden, Pasadena, California.

Bees and Rosemary -- A Minute in the Garden 58 from A Gardener's Notebook

 

See all the videos in “A minute in the garden” series in this YouTube playlist

 

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Bicolor Azalea

Bicolor Azalea

Bicolor Azalea

Arlington Garden, Pasadena, California

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Garden Vocabulary: Coppice/Coppicing

Garden Vocabulary LogoGarden Vocabulary: Coppice/Coppicing

Coppicing isn’t as popular or known as it was in the distant past, although experienced woodland managers might use it to provide supplies for building wattle fencing or other garden/farm structure, especially for historical recreation projects.

If you have access to a woodland with trees that respond to coppicing, you might be able to create supplies for your own garden or home projects right on-site. I have linked more information below that should allow you to get started.

From Wikipedia...

Coppice stool.jpg
By NaturenetOwn work, CC BY 3.0, Link

Coppice stool2.JPG

Coppicing is a traditional method of woodland management which takes advantage of the fact that many trees make new growth from the stump or roots if cut down. In a coppiced wood, which is called a copse, young tree stems are repeatedly cut down to near ground level. In subsequent growth years, many new shoots will emerge, and, after a number of years the coppiced tree, or stool, is ready to be harvested, and the cycle begins again. Pollarding is a similar process carried out at a higher level on the tree.

Many forestry practices worldwide involve cutting and regrowth, and coppicing has been of significance in many parts of lowland temperate Europe. The widespread and long-term practice of coppicing as a landscape-scale industry is something that remains of special importance in southern England. For this reason many of the English-language terms referenced in this article are particularly relevant to historic and contemporary practice in that area.

Typically a coppiced woodland is harvested in sections or coups[1] on a rotation. In this way, a crop is available each year somewhere in the woodland. Coppicing has the effect of providing a rich variety of habitats, as the woodland always has a range of different-aged coppice growing in it, which is beneficial for biodiversity. The cycle length depends upon the species cut, the local custom, and the use to which the product is put. Birch can be coppiced for faggots on a three- or four-year cycle, whereas oak can be coppiced over a fifty-year cycle for poles or firewood.

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More information on Coppicing:
Garden Vocabulary is inspired by

This Garden Vocabulary series seeks to introduce and explain to you — and in many cases, myself — words and terms associated with gardening. Please let me know if there are any terms you would like me to explore. You can leave your ideas in the comments section and we can learn together!