Dazzling Dahlias – 39 in a series – Dahlia “King Of The Autumn” via Biodiversity Heritage Library

Dazzling Dahlias – 39 in a series – Dahlia “King Of The Autumn” via Biodiversity Heritage Library

Dazzling Dahlias - 39 in a series -  Dahlia

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from Addisonia : colored illustrations and popular descriptions of plants.

DAHLIA “KING OF THE AUTUMN “

Dahlia Garden Hybrid Family Carduacear Thisti,© Family “King of the Autumn,” a variety of Dutch origin, is a good example of the “decorative” class of dahlias, the class that is perhaps the most popular with American dahlia-growers at the present day. The American Dahlia Society defines varieties of this class as having “double flowers, full to the center in early season, flat rather than ball-shaped, with broad, flat, somewhat loosely arranged floral rays with broad points or rounded tips, which are straight or decurved (turned down or back), not incurved, and with margins revolute, if rolled at all.” “Margins revolute,” if pronounced, would lead to placing a variety in the hybrid cactus group, with which the decoratives intergrade, and any pronounced showing of an “open center,” which is an occasional failing of the variety here figured, weakens the line of distinction between the decorative and peony groups. Again, the rounding and deepening of the flower-head and the cupping of the inner floral rays makes a transition to the “hybrid show” type. The decorative type of dahlia has been developed chiefly in Holland, England, and, more recently, in the United States. Most of the numerous varieties of this group now in cultivation in the United States are of domestic origin. The largest-flowered varieties grown at the present time belong in this group, the flower-heads occasionally attaining a diameter of thirteen inches. Many of the varieties have flower- heads that are too large to be represented in natural size on an Addisonia plate, and the desire to show the flowers without reduc- tion in size has led to the selection of one of the smaller-flowered varieties to represent the decorative class. The development of a “fully double” dahlia flower-head from the “single” and “semi-double” forms in which the dahlia was first known in Europe appears to have required a number of years of cultivation and selection. The credit of originating the first “fully double” dahlia has sometimes been given to a Belgian horti- culturist, M. Donckelaar, who is said to have attained this goal in 1814 or 1815. But there appears to be evidence that this result was accomplished as early as 1805 in Kensington Gardens, in I^ondon, and even earlier on the continent (Gard. Chron. III. 35:



Dahlias: Beautiful Varieties for Home & Garden




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Vintage Botanical Prints – 3 in a series – Nature drawing and design (1903) by Frank Steeley

Vintage Botanical Prints – 3 in a series – Nature drawing and design (1903) by Frank Steeley

Vintage Botanical Prints - 3 in a series - Nature drawing and design ((1903) by Frank Steeley

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from Nature drawing and design (1903) by Frank Steeley via The Internet Archive

PLATE I.

SNOWDROP (Gnlanthus nivalis). The name in Greek signifies “Milk Flower.”

This delicate and graceful little flower is the earliest to bloom, and, even before winter lias passed, may often be seen popping its head through the snow Tt is a native of the South of Europe, and grows in woods and pastures. It is occasionally found in an apparently wild state in England and Scotland, and some authorities claim that it is also a native of Britain.

It is largely cultivated in gardens, and is grown from a bulb. Each bulb produces two leaves and one single-flowered leafless stem. The leaves are grass-like in construction, which will be seen by reference to the plate, bluish-green in colour, short and erect in their early stages, and parallel- veined. The flower is white, and usually hangs downwards, as its name implies. It has three outer petals or segments, and three inner and shorter ones marked with green and notched on their outer edge. The outer petals are pure white, and when spread open form a bell-shaped flower of good proportion. When viewed in plan, the flower fits into an equilateral triangle ; the larger petals fill the corners, while the inner ones arrange themselves midway betwesn, and touch the sides; a little scalloped and radiating ornament forms the centre. The profile view, the construction of which is given on the sheet, also falls into a triangle.

Drawings of the plant, from various points of view, and in different stages of development, are shown in order to give a better idea of its characteristics.

There are many species of the Snowdrop, but only two are shown here. It is not thought necessary to enlarge upon their points of difference, as they are slight and unimportant to the designer for whom these drawings are intended.

Vintage Botanical Prints - 3 in a series - Nature drawing and design ((1903) by Frank Steeley


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Yew Leaves/Needles via Instagram

Yew Leaves/Needles

Yew Leaves/Needles via Instagram

Often we focus on the flowers of our garden plants while ignoring the leaves that provide then background and structure for those blooms to shine. Let’s give the leaves their due in the next few photos.

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Tomatoes in the Garden via TikTok

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Tomatoes in the Garden ##tomatoes ##garden ##gardening ##fruit ##food ##slomo ##red ##grow ##growing

♬ UNDERWATER WONDERSCAPES (MASTER) – Frederic Bernard

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Pittosporum Leaves via Instagram

Pittosporum Leaves

Pittosporum Leaves via Instagram

Often we focus on the flowers of our garden plants while ignoring the leaves that provide then background and structure for those blooms to shine. Let’s give the leaves their due in the next few photos.

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Historical Garden Books – 91 in a series – The Horticultural register, and general magazine (1831)

Historical Garden Books – 91 in a series – The Horticultural register, and general magazine (1831)

Historical Garden Books - 91 in a series - The Horticultural register, and general magazine (1831)

Historical Garden Books - 91 in a series - The Horticultural register, and general magazine (1831)

Historical Garden Books - 91 in a series - The Horticultural register, and general magazine (1831)

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org


The History of Landscape Design in 100 Gardens

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Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents – 48 in a series – The Cactaceae. v.1. via the Biodiversity Heritage Library

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents – 48 in a series – The Cactaceae. v.1. via the Biodiversity Heritage Library

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents - 48 in a series - The Cactaceae. v.1.

The Cactaceae. v.1.

Washington :Carnegie Institution of Washington,1919-1923.


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Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents - 48 in a series - The Cactaceae. v.1. via the Biodiversity Heritage Library


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Vintage Botanical Prints – 2 in a series – Turnera elegans from The floral cabinet and magazine of exotic botany (1837)

Vintage Botanical Prints – 2 in a series – Turnera elegans from The floral cabinet and magazine of exotic botany (1837)

Vintage Botanical Prints - 2 in a series - The floral cabinet and magazine of exotic botany (1837)

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from The floral cabinet and magazine of exotic botany (1837) via The Internet Archive

A slender evergreen shrub, about three feet high, with round green branches, covered with short, simple, somewhat appressed hairs. Leaves obscurely scabrous, with short simple pubescence, more especially on the veins and margins, and furnished at the base with two circular depressed glands. Flowers sessile, petiolar, with two subulate, slightly hairy bracteoles.

FloralcabinetmaIKnow 0011


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Vintage Botanical Prints - 2 in a series - Turnera elegans from The floral cabinet and magazine of exotic botany (1837)



Tomatoes Coming On via Instagram

Tomatoes Coming On

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This Is the Easiest Way to Avoid Overwatering Plants, According to the Royal Horticultural Society via Apartment Therapy

Just like many other events (like our Small/Cool Experience!), the Royal Horticulture Society made their annual Chelsea Garden Show virtual for the first time in 107 years. While it’s not over, horticulturalist experts have already shared an abundance of tips on how to successfully grow your own plants—including a clever way on how to avoid overwatering it.
 
Each day’s lineup is available for viewing on the RHS website, and Thursday was filled with helpful tips on how to grow your own vegetables and flowers. A panel answering audience questions about gardening took place between four of the RHS Gardening Advisors, during which horticulturist Lenka Cooke provided a simple solution to figuring out whether or not your plant is overwatered: by regularly feeling its weight.