Historical Garden Books: The Garden (1913) by Rachel R. Todd – 36 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: The Garden (1913) by Rachel R. Todd – 36 in a Series

 

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org

SO MANY readers of The Toronto World have made inquiries as to whether it is possible to obtain the articles on The Garden, by Rachael R. Todd, M. D., in pamphlet form, that Mr. W. N. Wilkinson, managing editor, has compiled a series of these articles, dealing with spring planting and the care of the garden during the spring and summeT. This is the first volume, and will be followed by one in the fall, containing hints on planting, the growing of bulbs and care of flowers during the autumn and winter. Care has been taken by the editor in revising the matter for this volume to eliminate extraneous matter. As each article deals with some one subject only, the index at the end of the book, will enable a quick reference to it. Rachel R. Todd, M. D., C. M.

More information on this book:

Publication date1913
PublisherToronto, Canada : The World
Digitizing sponsorUniversity of Toronto
LanguageEnglish
 
 
Find more information on garden history with these books


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Hydrangeas in the shade via Instagram

What is your favorite hydrangea? Leave a comment and share!

Hydrangeas in the shade

Scene from the Orto Botanico in the Brera District of Milan

Hydrangeas in the shade via Instagram

These hydrangeas were thriving in the warm, moist shade of the garden. 

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My Los Angeles 78: California Poppies (Eschscholzia californica) via Instagram

What is your favorite type of native plant? Leave a comment and share!

My Los Angeles 78: California Poppies (Eschscholzia californica) via Instagram

My Los Angeles 78: California Poppies (Eschscholzia californica)

Our state flower shining brightly on our friends garden. 

This has been a great year for all flowers but especially our native plants like these. The “superbloom” is fading fast, but there are still these pockets of color to be found throughout the city.


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Flowering Now: Yellow Shrub Roses via Instagram – April 16, 2019

What is your favorite type of rose? Leave a comment and share!

Flowering Now: Yellow Shrub Roses

Flowering Now: Yellow Shrub Roses via Instagram

In the neighborhood, these shrub roses are always a dependable exuberant, show at this time of year. 


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Flowering Now: Calandrinia(?) via Instagram – April 16, 2019

What is your favorite flower color? Leave a comment and share!

Flowering Now: Calandrinia(?) via Instagram - April 16, 2019

Flowering Now: Calandrinia(?)

Spotted in a neighbor’s garden. I am not quite sure of the ID as there have been many new Mediterranean plants in the recently planted drought-tolerant gardens. 

These “shouts” of color certainly catch the eye as you are walking by…or even driving. 


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Waterfall/Rivulet, BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona via Instagram

Where’s your favorite waterfall? Leave a comment and share!

Waterfall/Rivulet, BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona via Instagram

Waterfall/Rivulet, BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona

A peaceful scene in the garden—One of several gardens on the Cal Poly Pomona Campus. It is amazing how calming it can be to watch and listen to falling water, no matter how small the source. I think it has something to do with the chaotic nature of the flow. It is unpredictable and so it holds our attention.

From Cal Poly Pomona web site…

“The Rain Bird BioTrek Project is an educational experience for visitors of all ages that emphasizes the need to share knowledge, values, and behaviors that support sustainability on a finite Earth. In its greenhouse, gardens, and stations, it provides interactive educational connections to the tropical rainforest, California’s indigeneous plants and people, and other ancient and present day habitats.” 

Instagram and Follow

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Castor Bean Plant (Ricinus communis) via Instagram

What is your favorite plant? Leave a comment and share!

Castor Bean Plant (Ricinus communis)

In the Orto Botanico In the Brera District of Milan grows this lovely castor bean including seed pods.

While the seeds are poisonous and the caster bean is an invasive here in Southern California, it is often used as an ornamental in Europe. 

Castor Bean Plant (Ricinus communis) via Instagram

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A Very Prickly Pear (Opuntia), BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona

What is your favorite succulent or cactus? Leave a comment and share!

A Very Prickly Pear (Opuntia), BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona

One of several gardens on the Cal Poly Pomona Campus. Although relatively small, this garden has a large collection of plants both outdoors and inside a sizable glass house.

“The Rain Bird BioTrek Project is an educational experience for visitors of all ages that emphasizes the need to share knowledge, values, and behaviors that support sustainability on a finite Earth. In its greenhouse, gardens, and stations, it provides interactive educational connections to the tropical rainforest, California’s indigeneous plants and people, and other ancient and present day habitats.”

A Very Prickly Pear (Opuntia), BioTrek Ethnobotany Garden, Cal Poly Pomona

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Valley Carpenter Bee (female) (Xylocopa varipuncta) [Video] (1 minute, 38 seconds)

Valley Carpenter Bee (female) (Xylocopa varipuncta)

Valley Carpenter Bee (female) (Xylocopa varipuncta)

A female Valley Carpenter Bees (Xylocopa varipuncta) feeds on Mexican sage in my garden a few days ago. I was out working to clear up a mass of grass and weeds caused by the rainy year we have had when I spotted her nearly in my face. I took a break and watched for quite a while she fed.

This sage was a recent addition to the garden, specifically for use by bees and hummingbirds, so it is great to see it being put to use.

From Wikipedia

Xylocopa varipuncta, the valley carpenter bee, is one of three species of carpenter bee found from western New Mexico to northern California.[1] Females are a metallic black while males are fuzzy and gold with green eyes. They are the largest bees found in California,[2] growing to around 1 inch (2.5 cm) in length.

A distinguishing characteristic that uniquely separates X. varipuncta from other species of bees is their ability to thermoregulate. This allows them to fly at very high temperatures without overheating and at low temperatures without freezing.[3] By modifying their foraging patterns and flying between different altitudes depending upon temperature, the valley carpenter bee is able to adapt to very different environments through predisposed behavioral patterns.[3]


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Iris on Cal Poly Pomona Campus via Instagram

What is blooming in your garden? Leave a comment and share!

Iris on Cal Poly Pomona Campus

A lovely bit of Spring as I walked around campus a few weeks ago. The contrast of the bright yellow against the dark@green leaves really made them pop. This great bloom is probably another result of our good winter rains this year. 

Iris on Cal Poly Pomona Campus via Instagram

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