Historical Garden Books: The lure of the garden by Hildegarde Hawthorne (1911) – 49 in a series


Historical Garden Books: The lure of the garden by Hildegarde Hawthorne (1911) – 49 in a series

Historical Garden Books: The lure of the garden by Hildegarde Hawthorne (1911) - 49 in a seriesHistorical Garden Books: The lure of the garden by Hildegarde Hawthorne (1911) - 49 in a series

Historical Garden Books: The lure of the garden by Hildegarde Hawthorne (1911) - 49 in a seriesHistorical Garden Books: The lure of the garden by Hildegarde Hawthorne (1911) - 49 in a series

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THE LURE OF THE GARDEN

INTRODUCTION

IN spite of its material of green leaf and fragrant flower, a garden is the work of man. It requires human care, human companionship, human love; and yields a return that is peculiarly mingled of nature and art, bestowing upon any who enter its exquisite precincts something of the sanity, wholesomeness, and simplicity of the world of out-of-doors, together with the better portion of the grace, interest, and social charm of the world within the house. Its fountains murmur a lilt not too distant from the laughter or the tears of those who carved the stone basins into which the water drips. In bower and green way a compre- hending solitude lies waiting for whoever comes to seek its quiet pleasures, and there is hardly a mood known to man for which the garden has neither solace nor inspiration. While any gathering of friends or comrades becomes more intimate there, where even the shyest takes heart of grace, where the most self-con- scious forgets to pose, where words come readily to the silent, and where silence is never irksome.



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Captivating Cactus: 4 in a series – Propagation via Botanical Bright on TikTok

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Propagation

Gazania Flowers in Watercolor via Instagram

Gazania Flowers in Watercolor

Gazania Flowers in Watercolor via Instagram


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Brighten Your Days With These Rudbeckia Pillows and More From Douglas E. Welch Design and Photography [For Sale]

Brighten Your Days With These Rudbeckia Pillows and More From Douglas E. Welch Design and Photography [For Sale]

Brighten Your Days With These Rudbeckia Pillows and More From Douglas E. Welch Design and Photography [For Sale]

Includes throw blankets, duvet covers, pillows, hoodies, tees, and much more!

Available exclusively from
DouglasEWelch.com/shop/232


 

Floor Pillow

  • Vibrant double-sided print floor pillows are a versatile seating or lounging option that will update any room
  • Independent designs, custom printed when you order
  • Durable 100% spun polyester cushion cover – fills must be purchased separately for this floor pillow
  • Concealed zip opening for a clean look and easy care
  • Note: Some designs are not available in all sizes.
  • We recommend using inserts/fills that are bigger than the covers to ensure a plump finish

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Historical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) – 38 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) – 38 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) - 38 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) - 38 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) - 38 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: The John A. Doyle Company (1899) - 38 in a series

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Hardy Variegated Rose,

ROGER LAMBELIN.

One of the most remarkable Roses yet offered. The petals are irregular on the edges like a double Petunia; the color is glowing crimson throughout, except the edges of the petals,which are all distinctly marked with a white band, forming a sharp contrast and the most unique combination of colors known in Roses. The growth is free and vigorous and the fragrance is delightful, equal to the finest hardy Roses. This is a “novelty” of the most striking order.



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Lovely grapes, Pop Up ”Beach” and Market with DJ via Instagram

Lovely grapes, Pop Up ”Beach” and Market with DJ

Lovely grapes, Pop Up ”Beach” and Market with DJ via Instagram

Praça de Carlos Alberto, Porto, Portugal

A great moment to shop for some fresh produce and trinkets and kick back for a while.


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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

Bringing nature home: Why and how to garden with native plants via Coastal View News

Gardening with plants native to the Santa Ynez mountains and Carpinteria’s coastal bluffs is a beautiful way to honor the ecosystems in which we live, as well as providing an environmentally sustainable alternative to water-guzzling landscapes such as lawns.  

Native plants bloom and fruit prolifically throughout the year with almost no water, providing crucial food and shelter to animals, birds and insects and a limitless palette of textures, colors and scents for even the most formally landscaped garden. While the care requirements for natives are different from water-loving ornamentals, once established they require little time and effort to look lovely year-round.

Read Bringing nature home: Why and how to garden with native plants via Coastal View News



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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Dazzling Dahlias – 5 in a series – How to Grow Dahlias via White Flower Farm

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Dazzling Dahlias - 5 in a series - How to Grow Dahlias via White Flower Farm

Dahlias offer flamboyant flowers on lush plants from summer through fall, right up to the first frost. Fully hardy to zone 8, these hybrids of species native to Mexico and Colombia may overwinter in Zone 7 with a thick blanket of mulch. Gardeners in colder zones can get a head start by planting tubers in pots 4 to 6 weeks before the last spring frost date. Plant tubers several inches deep in a light, soilless potting mix and water sparingly until new growth appears, then more freely. Place pots in a sunny window or under grow lights, and then plant outside after danger of frost has passed. Taller varieties will need staking, with stakes placed carefully so as not to injure the tuber or roots. If planting is delayed (either indoors or in the ground), store the tubers in their bags in a cool, dry, dark location.

Read and Watch How to Grow Dahlias via White Flower Farm



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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Historical Garden Books: My garden of dreams by Abram Linwood Urban – 48 in a series


Historical Garden Books: My garden of dreams by Abram Linwood Urban – 48 in a series

Historical Garden Books:  My garden of dreams by Abram Linwood Urban - 48 in a series

Historical Garden Books:  My garden of dreams by Abram Linwood Urban - 48 in a series

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A GARDEN ENCLOSED

In his “Song of Songs” Solomon sings of “a garden enclosed” Into such a garden Tennyson’s Maud was called by her lover.

Andrew Marvel speaks of “green thought in a green shade*’ — fancies of the mind in the lovely quiet of a green old garden.

The captive Israelite found his ideal of security and peace “under his vine and fig tree/’ where none made him afraid.

These poetic representations are symbols, for, will fancies springs or dreams come, or lovers meet, or the deep sense of home be felt, in a garden open to the public gaze?

The enclosed garden symbolizes civilized man’s relation to wild nature. At first it is a contest for mastery, but it results in an alliance by which nature is tamed and rendered more beautiful, and in turn ministers to man and becomes his inspiration in art and song.

 



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Historical Seed Catalogs: Field, Garden And Flower Seeds : Annual Seed Catalog, The Bruns Seed Co.(1920) – 37 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Field, Garden And Flower Seeds : Annual Seed Catalog, The Bruns Seed Co.(1920) – 37 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Field, Garden And Flower Seeds : Annual Seed Catalog, The Bruns Seed Co.(1920) - 37 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: Field, Garden And Flower Seeds : Annual Seed Catalog, The Bruns Seed Co.(1920) - 37 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Field, Garden And Flower Seeds : Annual Seed Catalog, The Bruns Seed Co.(1920) - 37 in a seriesCAT31343796 0100

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A Personal Word

It is a pleasure to hand you my 1920 seed catalog, and as many of my customers have made inquiries as to why they did not receive our catalog last season,

I will take this opportunity to explain the reason.

During April, 1918, just as we were at the rush point of the seed selling season, I was called into the service of our country and with the enlisting of other members of the firm for service, it took our complete executive force and the business was necessarily dis- continued.

After spending ‘ one year in Uncle Sam’s army, mostly in overseas duty on four different fronts, some of which were in quite strenuous action, we were discharged in April 1919 and at once resumed our civil life in the seed business, but too late to prepare and issue a catalog for the 1919 season. It requires at least three or four months to prepare the copy and get the first catalog from the press, and for that reason we had to be content to serve only our local customers during the 1919 season.

If some of our customers not receiving a catalog got the impression that we were out of the business, we hope the appearance of this catalog will correct that wrong impression, as the seed business is our life work and we are in it from now on stronger than ever. We have enlarged our business greatly through the^purchase of the business of the Mills Seed Company, of Washington, Iowa, as fully ex- plained on the next page, and are prepared to handle a larger volume of business and do it with more promptness and dispatch than ever before.

It has been our effort to make this catalog not only interesting, but instructive, and you cannot help but learn considerable if you read it from cover to cover. Everything is represented just as the camera takes it, the illustrations being photo reproductions and not the artist drawn pictures that you find in many other seed catalogs. Through the pur- chase of the Mills Seed Company we will issue one hundred thousand more catalogs this season than heretofore and if you Mve a friend or two that you believe would like a copy of this catalog, please send us their name.

 


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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!