Flowering Now: Apple Blossom Camellia

Flowering Now: Apple Blossom Camellia

Flowering Now: Apple Blossom Camellia

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Camellia is a genus of flowering plants in the family Theaceae. They are found in eastern and southern Asia, from the Himalayas east to Japan and Indonesia. There are 100–300 described species, with some controversy over the exact number. There are also around 3,000 hybrids. The genus was named by Linnaeusafter the Jesuit botanist Georg Joseph Kamel, who worked in the Philippines and described a species of camellia (although Linnaeus did not refer to Kamel’s account when discussing the genus).[1] Camellias are famous throughout East Asia; they are known as cháhuā (茶花, ‘tea flower’) in Chinese, tsubaki (椿) in Japanese, dongbaek-kkot (동백꽃) in Korean, and as hoa trà or hoa chè in Vietnamese. — Wikipedia.org

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California Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma californica ) — A Minute in the Garden 61 from A Gardener’s Notebook

Part of a series of garden minutes from A Gardener’s Notebook

After a long absence, the scrub jays have returned to the garden. Now I need to get more peanuts for the feeder. They love them so much and are so entertaining to watch as they choose just the right one to take off and bury or hammer open on a nearby branch.

California Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma californica ) -- A Minute in the Garden 61 from A Gardener's Notebook

 

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Interesting Plant: Alpine Strawberries (Fragaria vesca)

Interesting Plant: Alpine Strawberries (Fragaria vesca)

We are always looking for more food items to grow, even here in our somewhat shady garden, so when I saw these strawberries they intrigued me. While we have a few pots of hybrid strawberries, I wonder if these might not be a better choice for our particular conditions. This is only the beginning of my research. — Douglas

Interesting Plant: Alpine Strawberries (Fragaria vesca)

Public Domain, Link

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Fragaria vesca, commonly called wild strawberrywoodland strawberryAlpine strawberryCarpathian StrawberryEuropean strawberry, or fraisier des bois, is a perennial herbaceous plant in the rose family that grows naturally throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, and that produces edible fruits.[1][2]

Vilmorin-Andrieux (1885) makes a distinction between wild or wood strawberries (Fragaria vesca) and alpine strawberries (Fragaria alpina),[6] a distinction which is not made by most seed companies or nurseries, which usually sell Fragaria vesca as “alpine strawberry”.

Under wild or wood strawberry, Vilmorin says:

It has seldom been seen in gardens since the introduction of the Red Alpine Strawberry. … Wood Strawberry possesses a quite particular perfume and delicacy of flavour. 2,500 seeds to the gramme.

Under alpine strawberry, Vilmorin says:

A very different plant to the Wood Strawberry, and distinguished by the greater size of all its parts — the fruit in particular — and especially by the property (which is particular to it) of producing flowers and fruit continuously all through the summer. … The fruit has nearly the same appearance and flavour as that of the Wood Strawberry, but is generally larger, longer, and more pointed in shape. The seed is also perceptibly larger and longer. A gramme contains only about 1,500 seeds. — Wikipedia

More information on Cupressus cashmeriana :

Alpine Strawberry Seeds
 
 

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Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Interesting Plant: Butterfly Mint Bush (Monardella subglabra)

Butterfly Mint Bush (Monardella subglabra)

Interesting Plant: Butterfly Mint Bush (Monardella subglabra)

What are your thoughts on this Interesting Plant? Drop a note in the comments! 

Monardella subglabra, Butterfly Mint Bush, is a one foot tall perennial covered with one inch purple flowers in Jun-Jul. Butterfly Mint bush has a mint odor but much less than many others. Native to the Central Coast to So. Calif.. It likes part shade to sun. It will tolerate reg. garden water but becomes drought tolerant with age. It is cold tolerant to at least 10 deg.. I’ve seen this at the Santa Barbara Bot. Garden form a mass of bright purple with no foliage showing. It is not as showy in the nursery but still pretty and needs so little care we’d forgotten we’d planted it. It was covering an 3\’ area of a flower bed with dark green foliage on a plant 2″ tall. We remembered it was there when we finally got a little rainfall and it flowered. Ta! Da! Purple flowers all over the place! Our mother plant is 15 years old and still thriving. Syn. Monardella purpurea
Monardella subglabra tolerates sand.

Monardella subglabra’s foliage type is evergreen and has fragrance.
Monardella subglabra’s flower color is violet.

Las Pilitas Nursery

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Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

In The Getty Garden via Instagram

In The Getty Garden

In The Getty Garden

The Getty Center

I believe this is a Kniphofia. 

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DIY: How to Build a Raised Garden Bed via Mother Earth News

Here is an excellent and detailed article on building raised beds for your own garden. Be sure to bookmark this for future reference. You’re going to want it eventually. — Douglas

How to Build a Raised Garden Bed via Mother Earth News

DIY: How to Build a Raised Garden Bed via Mother Earth News

A DIY project for a permanent garden box to provide a raised bed for your plants and decorate your backyard.

October 2017 By Sara Bendrick

For those who want to improve their backyards, author Sara Bendrick provides a variety of DIY projects in Big Impact Landscaping so homeowners can get the most out of their property, expand their living space, and enjoy more time outdoors. Here, Bendrick gives step-by-step instructions for building a permanent U-shaped vegetable garden box — as well as an attached bench to help you enjoy your backyard plants.

U-Shaped Vegetable Garden
Level: Beginner to intermediate
Cost: $$
Time commitment: 1 day
Professionals needed: None
Dimensions: 8-feet-by-9-feet U-shape

 

Read this entire article – How to Build a Raised Garden Bed via Mother Earth News

Coleus Kong “Salmon Pink” via Instagram

Coleus Kong “Salmon Pink”

Coleus Kong “Salmon Pink”

On the patio this morning

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First Bulbs Appear In The Garden

First Bulbs Appear In The Garden

First Bulbs Appear In The Garden

Here in Los Angeles, our bulbs — in this case, paperwhites — start to rise in the Winter, usually after our first good rain. Still waiting on that rain though. 

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19 The Fruits and Fruit Trees of Monticello | Douglas E. Welch Holiday Gift Guide 2017

Dew gift guide 2017 header

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19 The Fruits and Fruit Trees of Monticello

I was doing some research for my wife’s next book today and came across this book as a source. While I had only planned on mining it for the information I needed, I found myself reading entire sections. It is an amazing history of the agricultural side of Thomas Jefferson and Monticello as a vast agricultural research center, long before anything so called was even imagined. Not everything was successful, of course, and the book lays out all the failures along with the successes.

We visited Monticello many, many years ago (October 1994, according to my notes on the back of the prints) and visiting it again, through the pages of this book, reminded me of how striking the home, the gardens and the farmland all were.

Photos from our trip to Monticello in 1994

Monticello 1

Monticello 2

Monticello 3

Monticello 4

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Lovely Garden House via @rachael_adkins on Instagram

Lovely Garden Shed via @rachael_adkins on Intsagram

Lovely Garden House via @rachael_adkins on Instagram

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