In the garden…New Obelisk for the Clytostoma

Obelisk before

Finally — I know I use that word a lot — I was finally able to locate and install a new, steel frame,  obelisk so the clytostoma vine wasn’t flopping over itself with nothing to climb on. It used to cover a trellis that ran along my office windows, but that came down in disrepair years ago. I left one post for it to scramble on, but even that eventually collapsed from rot. So it just stood there, self-supporting on its thick lower vines and flopping over more and more.

Obelisk

At the nursery yesterday, though, we happened upon an obelisk that met all our needs. It was tall, at least 7 feet to give the vine some space to sprawl. It also had to be cheaper than the typical $100-$200 dollars I was seeing online and locally. For whatever reason, this steel frame, simple but elegant was only $50. Sold!

Obelisk after

I trimmed out some of the more sprawling vines, removed the remains of a stake that had probably been with the plant since it was put in the ground, and then set the obelisk over. With a little judicious pushing and pulling my wife and I got the plant situated. That said, the trunk vines are old, thick and a bit forceful. I will probably have to stake at least one side into the ground to counteract that natural pull towards the sun.

After top

I think it looks quite nice and it also provides some space for hanging some other decorative items. Now that it has some support it should flower much more and it can be trimmed back to the frame each year to keep it neat.

After closeup

If you can’t find the obelisk you want locally, Amazon has quite a few. It might, at least, give you some ideas of what you are after for your garden.


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Interesting Plant: Cupressus cashmeriana

Interesting Plant: Cupressus cashmeriana

I really like the weeping habit of this cypress. At around 40’ tall it is a bit too large for my garden but I could easily see it being a focal point of a larger garden. — Douglas

Interesting Plant: Cupressus cashmeriana

Cypress tag

What are your thoughts on this Interesting Plant? Drop a note in the comments! 

Cupressus cashmeriana (Bhutan cypress, Kashmir cypress, weeping cypress;[1] Dzongkha language: Tsenden) is a species of cypress native to the eastern Himalaya in Bhutan and adjacent areas of Arunachal Pradesh in northeastern India. It is also introduced in China and Nepal.[1] It grows at moderately high altitudes of 1,250–2,800 metres (4,100–9,190 ft).[2]

Cupressus cashmeriana is a medium-sized to large coniferous tree growing 20–45 metres (66–148 ft) tall, rarely much more, with a trunk up to 3 metres (9.8 ft) diameter. The foliage grows in strongly pendulous sprays of blue-green, very slender, flattened shoots. The leaves are scale-like, 1–2 mm long, up to 5 mm long on strong lead shoots; young trees up to about 5 years old have juvenile foliage with soft needle-like leaves 3–8 mm long.[2]

The seed cones are ovoid, 10–21 mm long and 10–19 mm broad, with 8–12 scales, dark green, maturing dark brown about 24 months after pollination. The cones open at maturity to shed the seed. The pollen cones are 3–5 mm long, and release pollen in early spring.

A tree of 95 metres (312 ft) tall has recently been reported,[3] but the measurements await verification. – Wikipedia

More information on Cupressus cashmeriana :

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Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Worker Bee 🐝 via Instagram

Worker Bee 🐝 via Instagram

Worker Bee 🐝 

Spotted today, among many other bees and butterflies, at the nursery. 

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In the garden…September 16, 2017: Black Satin Blackberry (Rubus Ursinus) [Video] (1:35)

In the garden…September 16, 2017: Black Satin Blackberry (Rubus Ursinus)

In this episode:

A look at our young blackberry plant which is spinning off a few fruit even in its first year of being planted. This blackberry fruits on each year’s canes, so these canes will be removed and the new growth will fruit next year.

In the garden...September 16, 2017: Black Satin Blackberry (Rubus Ursinus) [Video]

 

The blackberry is an edible fruit produced by many species in the Rubus genus in the Rosaceae family, hybrids among these species within the Rubus subgenus, and hybrids between the Rubus and Idaeobatus subgenera. The taxonomy of the blackberries has historically been confused because of hybridization and apomixis, so that species have often been grouped together and called species aggregates. For example, the entire subgenus Rubus has been called the Rubus fruticosus aggregate, although the species R. fruticosus is considered a synonym of R. plicatus.[1]

What distinguishes the blackberry from its raspberry relatives is whether or not the torus (receptacle or stem) “picks with” (i.e., stays with) the fruit. When one picks a blackberry fruit, the torus does stay with the fruit. With a raspberry, the torus remains on the plant, leaving a hollow core in the raspberry fruit.

The term bramble, a word meaning any impenetrable thicket, has traditionally been applied specifically to the blackberry or its products,[2] though in the United States it applies to all members of the Rubus genus. In the western US, the term caneberry is used to refer to blackberries and raspberries as a group rather than the term bramble.

The usually black fruit is not a berry in the botanical sense of the word. Botanically it is termed an aggregate fruit, composed of small drupelets. It is a widespread and well-known group of over 375 species, many of which are closely related apomictic microspecies native throughout Europe, northwestern Africa, temperate western and central Asia and North and South America.[3]

— Wikipedia.org

More information on Tomato:
Books:
 
Plants and Seeds:
 
  

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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 

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Garden Alphabet #90: B is for…Blackberry

Garden Alphabet #90: Blackberry

Monrovia Black Satin Blackberry in my garden today.

garden-alphabet-blackberry

The blackberry is an edible fruit produced by many species in the Rubus genus in the Rosaceae family, hybrids among these species within the Rubus subgenus, and hybrids between the Rubus and Idaeobatus subgenera. The taxonomy of the blackberries has historically been confused because of hybridization and apomixis, so that species have often been grouped together and called species aggregates. For example, the entire subgenus Rubus has been called the Rubus fruticosus aggregate, although the species R. fruticosus is considered a synonym of R. plicatus.[1]

What distinguishes the blackberry from its raspberry relatives is whether or not the torus (receptacle or stem) “picks with” (i.e., stays with) the fruit. When one picks a blackberry fruit, the torus does stay with the fruit. With a raspberry, the torus remains on the plant, leaving a hollow core in the raspberry fruit.

The term bramble, a word meaning any impenetrable thicket, has traditionally been applied specifically to the blackberry or its products,[2] though in the United States it applies to all members of the Rubus genus. In the western US, the term caneberry is used to refer to blackberries and raspberries as a group rather than the term bramble.

The usually black fruit is not a berry in the botanical sense of the word. Botanically it is termed an aggregate fruit, composed of small drupelets. It is a widespread and well-known group of over 375 species, many of which are closely related apomictic microspecies native throughout Europe, northwestern Africa, temperate western and central Asia and North and South America.[3]

— Wikipedia.org

More information on Tomato:
Books:
 
 
Plants and Seeds:
 
  

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! 

 See Previous Garden Alphabet Entries Here

20% OFF – Labor Day Sale – Pink Geranium (Pelargonium) Bags, Smartphone Covers and Much More!

20% OFF - Labor Day Sale
Pink Geranium (Pelargonium) Bags, Smartphone Covers and Much More!

20% OFF – Labor Day Sale
Pink Geranium (Pelargonium) Bags, Smartphone Covers and Much More!

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DouglasEWelch.com/shop/59 (Direct Link)
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7 Excellent Screening Hedges/Trees from Garden of Eva

I see so many bad hedging choices made here in Los Angeles, so when our new neighbors wanted to plant a hedge, I found this article on non-traditions and perhaps better choices. — Douglas

7 Excellent Screening Hedges/Trees from Garden of Eva

Ficus Nitida and Ficus Benjamina are not the solution.

Whenever a client asks about installing a hedge they’re usually thinking of planting a row using Ficus Nitida (Retusa) or Benjamina.  They have been Southern California’s “go to” trees for privacy hedges for decades, but there are a number of reasons to pass them by. They can be very invasive and their roots grow close to the surface, damaging sidewalks. While they grow fast, they need frequent trimming and are not drought-toelerant. They require a substantial amount of water to establish and a moderate amount once established.

What follows is information on seven excellent hedges provided by the  North Park Nursery. If you’re thinking about adding a hedge and are concerned about how it will behave and how much water it will consume, here is valuable information about the best plant material for the job.

Read 7 Excellent Screening Hedges/Trees from Garden of Eva



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Fall Cactus & Succulent Sale – Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017 – 10a-4p – Encino, CA

Fall Cactus & Succulent Sale

 

 

Another nice looking tomato from the container garden

 

Another nice looking tomato from the container garden

Another nice looking tomato from the container garden

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Summer rose in black and white

Summer rose in black and white

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