Bring the garden inside with these Hydrangea Pillows, Totes, iPhone Cases and Much More!

Bring the garden inside with these Hydrangea Pillows, Totes, iPhone Cases and Much More!

Bring the garden inside with these Hydrangea Pillows, Totes, iPhone Cases and Much More!

Directly from my Instagram Photos

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  • Concealed zip opening for a clean look and easy care

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Garden Decor: Bring Light and Movement to the Garden with a DIY Wind Spinner via Garden Therapy

I believe I have some wire like this lying around after a previous project. Add this to a few marbles from Joe’s old toys and should be easy to put these together. —Douglas
 
This easy-to-make garden decoration spins in the wind, creating a mesmerizing optical illusion where it looks as if the marble is spinning up and down the wire coil surrounding it. I love to hang these in the garden because they bring interest and movement, and the wire reflects sunlight so the whole thing dances and sparkles beautifully.
Read Bring Light and Movement to the Garden with a DIY Wind Spinner via Garden Therapy


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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Heirloom tomatoes at the local Farmers Market via My Instagram

Heirloom tomatoes at the local Farmers Market via My Instagram

Heirloom tomatoes at the local Farmers Market

Another trip to the Farmers Market this week and another batch of wonderful produce pictures. 

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Learn more about tomatoes

 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Historical Garden Books: Every man his own gardener : The complete gardener, or, Gardener’s calendar of work to be done in the kitchen, fruit, flower, forcing garden &c. for every month in the year (1843) – 13 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: Every man his own gardener : The complete gardener, or, Gardener’s calendar of work to be done in the kitchen, fruit, flower, forcing garden &c. for every month in the year (1843) – 13 in a Series

Historical Garden Books: Every man his own gardener : The complete gardener, or, Gardener's calendar of work to be done in the kitchen, fruit, flower, forcing garden &c. for every month in the year (1843) - 13 in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books: Every man his own gardener : The complete gardener, or, Gardener's calendar of work to be done in the kitchen, fruit, flower, forcing garden &c. for every month in the year (1843) - 13 in a Series

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JANUARY.

WORK TO BE DONE IN THE KITCHEN GARDEN. PREPARATIONS FOR EARLY CROPS.

As early productions of several sorts of kitchen garden vegetables are in particular request, this is now the principal season to begin to make preparations in forwarding that business, whereby to raise the respective sorts required in early perfection, both by means of hotbeds, and by culture in the natural ground.

But as some particular sorts of the more tender species are to be obtained only by aid of hotbeds, such as cucumbers and melons ; and others of more hardy nature, when in request in the earliest season, require also the assistance of hotbeds, such as sallading, radishes, asparagus, kidneybeans, peas, &c. ; that where it is required to have any of these productions as early as possible, should now proceed in forwarding, in preparation, the necessary supplies of hot dung, rich earth, and other requisites proper in their cultivation, by hotbeds accordingly, as explained for each under its respective head.

And for several early natural crops in the full ground, should now prepare warm borders, and other similar compartments, in proper time for their reception, by manuring, where necessary; with proper dung, and giving a general good digging, ready for early peas, beans, radishes, spinach, &c. ; and for the particulars of which, see each sort under its respective head, as observed above in the hotbed articles.

More information on this book:

Publication date 1843
Publisher London : Printed for Thomas Tegg
Contributor University of Southampton
Language English
 

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Interesting Plant: California Fuchsia (Epilobium canum)

 Interesting Plant: California Fuchsia (Epilobium canum)

Zauschneria flowers-500px.jpg
By Stan Shebs, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

What are your thoughts on this Interesting Plant? Drop a note in the comments!

Epilobium canum, also known as California fuchsia or Zauschneria, is a species of willowherb in the evening primrose family (Onagraceae).[1] It is native to dry slopes and in chaparral of western North America, especially California. It is a perennial plant, notable for the profusion of bright scarlet flowers in late summer and autumn.

The name reflects that in the past it used to be treated in a distinct genus Zauschneria, but modern studies have shown that it is best placed within the genus Epilobium. Other common names include California-fuchsia (from the resemblance of the flowers to those of fuchsias), hummingbird flower or hummingbird trumpet (the flowers are very attractive to hummingbirds), and firechalice.

The original genus name was in honor of Johann Baptista Josef Zauschner (1737–1799), a professor of medicine and botany in Prague. – Wikipedia

More information on California Fuchsia (Epilobium canum):

View all past “Interesting Plant” posts


Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Historical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company (1894) – 3 in a series

Archive.org has a host of old seed catalogs (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company (1894) – 3 in a series

I was really struck by the color pages of this catalog. I didn’t think they went in for color much at this time (1894) and I would guess it had to be somewhat expensive for them to include that. I guess that speaks to the company’s success that they were able to afford it for those plants that really sold themselves with their color — in this case, sweet peas and nasturtiums. — Douglas

Historical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company  (1894) - 3 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company  (1894) - 3 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company  (1894) - 3 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: D. Landreth Seed Company  (1894) - 3 in a series

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SWEET PEA.

Sweet Pea and the Nasturtium each separately improved by the mixing or hybridization of distinct colors and qualities and the perpetuation of the new product, or in some cases by the seizing of accidental sprouts, now both take rank among the most valuable garden plants, not surpassed in brilliant effect by any biennials, while they both are within the easy culture of any one of the least gardening experience.

The Sweet Pea, as respects size, texture, diversity of colors, exquisite shades, phenomenal production of blooms, and exquisite perfiime, has, in the last few years, jumped to the first place among the sweetest of climbing plants. So productive is it that single plants have been known to have borne over looo sprays of flowers.

No praise can be too high for the Sweet Pea. It is the fashionable flower consequent upon its rare development in beauty, ranging froni deepest purple to pure white and, in perfume, fragrant as Mignonette.

It is in place everywhere, in bouquets, in vases, as masses on the lawn, as ribbons along paths, or trained as screens in the form of hedges, or clambering on trellises to hide unsightly objects.

It is the most useful and ornamental of all hardy annuals, growing best in a cool soil and most luxuriantly under conditions of rain or moisture.

In planting the seed it should be put into the soil in very early Spring, to secure an early development, as early, if not earlier, than the planting of garden peas.

If sown in rows, the trenches to receive the seeds should be marked out four inches deep and the seeds placed two inches apart, and covered at first -^rith only two inches of earth, the full covering being attained gradually.

The object of deep seeding is that the roots may be well down to resist drouth. Planted in single rows, one ounce of Sweet Peas will seed forty feet, but for eff’ective purposes, one ounce should be allowed to every twenty feet or even less.

More information on this catalog:

Publication date 19uu
Publisher Bristol, PA Bloomsdale, PA Baltimore, MD New Freedom, PA : D. Landreth Seed Company
Digitizing sponsor IMLS
Contributor New York Botanical Garden, LuEsther T. Mertz Library
Language English
Volume 1894 D. Landreth Seed Company
 

Learn more about gardening history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Garden Decor: Copper-esque Planters via Bower Power

Garden Decor: Copper-esque Planters via Bower Power

I had shared these planters with my Insta-friends but I need to show you guys how to do this because they are SO beautiful!  They are the perfect amount of fall and look great with mums.  And if your planter has a little texture to them, it really pops.  The fun part is that they are easier than you think!

First start off with your giant planter.  Mine were discolored and even after scrubbing them, they still sported green areas and even some darker splotches where the color was fading.  Time for a makeover!

Read Copper-esque Planters via Bower Power


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Alien looking new growth on prickly pear (opuntia) start via Instagram

Alien looking new growth on prickly pear (opuntia) start via Instagram

Alien looking new growth on prickly pear (opuntia) start

This is one of 4 paddles I harvested a year or so ago. All four are now growing strongly, but this was the last one to show new growth. They are all ready to be planted out in the garden now. 

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Learn more about cactus and succulents

 

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Flowering Now: An interesting geranium in the garden this morning via Instagram

Flowering Now: An interesting geranium in the garden this morning via Instagram

Flowering Now: An interesting geranium in the garden this morning

This geranium came from a broken shoot my wife found on the street one day and has grown into a lovely plant. It is quite different from a more typical geranium with these small, thin, petals on its flowers. 

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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
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Historical Garden Books: Popular gardening for town and country, Volume 4 (1888-1889) – 12 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these books. I’ll be sharing more books as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: Popular gardening for town and country, Volume 4 (1888-1889) – 12 in a Series

A bound collection of this monthly newsletter complete with Index.

Historical Garden Books:  Popular gardening for town and country, Volume 4 (1888-1889) - 12 in a SeriesPopulargardening4188unse 0011

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org


AN

ILLUSTRATED PERIODICAL

DEVOTED TO

Horticulture in all its Branches.

CONDUCTED BY

Elias A. Long, Author of “ Ornamental Gardening for Americans
“ The Home Florist,” Etc.,

Volume 4, 1888=89.

BUFFALO, N. Y.:

Popular Gardening Publishing Co.

The Apple Crop and Foreign Markets. A yield of Apples rather above the average in this country and especially in the fruit sections of Western New York, Canada, and Nova Scotia is at this date a certainty, and corresponds with the fruit crop report published in our July issue. But with a large crop the market outlook is per- haps brighter for steady prices, than for some years past. This is due partly to the growing Western demand in our own country; but chiefly because of the almost entire failure of Apples in Great Britain, with but a light crop on the Continent. In England, this is doubtless caused by the unprecedently cold, rainy season, together with the previous season’s drought, con- tributing to fearful insect ravages this year. The consequence to our own fruit growers must be that all the first grade of winter Apples can be disposed of at good figures, the quotations of September 10, giving prices at Liverpool, on the first shipments as, per barrel: Kings, $1.85 to $5.75; Blush, $4.35 to $5.08; Baldwins, $2.88 to $3.40; Greenings, $2.40 to $2.76. These prices were for sound fruit of good size, well packed and graded.

More information on this book:

Publication date 1885
Publisher Buffalo, N.Y. : Popular Gardening Pub. Co
Digitizing sponsor University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Alternates
Language English
Volume v.4(1888-1889)

Learn more about gardening history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library