Interesting Plant: Douglas Iris (Iris douglasiana)

Douglas Iris (Iris douglasiana)

I have always found it difficult to grow iris in my garden with its dark and dry shade, but perhaps a native iris might more easily cope with this environment, as long as find a way to give it more water.

DouglasIris.jpg

Iris douglasiana flower 2003-03-17.jpg

What are your thoughts on this Interesting Plant? Drop a note in the comments! 

Iris douglasiana (Douglas iris) is a common wildflower of the coastal regions of Northern and Central California and southern Oregon in the United States. The Douglas Iris was first described by 19th century botanist David Douglas in Monterey, California. It grows mainly at lower elevations, below 100 meters (330 ft), though it is occasionally found at heights of up to 1,000 meters (3,300 ft). It is most common in grasslands near the coast; it is regarded as a noxious weed in pastures, because it forms clumps that inhibit other vegetation, and its leaves are bitter and unpalatable to cattle.

This is a typical beardless Iris of subgenus Limniris, series Californicae, growing from a rhizome that is typically under a centimeter in diameter. Its leaves are about 2 centimeters (0.79 in) wide. It flowers from April to June. Flowers are usually a purplish-blue, though occasionally white or yellow flowers are found. Two or three flowers are found on each stem, which is of variable height, ranging from 15–80 centimeters (5.9–31.5 in) tall.

Several varieties have been recognized, for example Iris douglasiana var. altissima (Jeps.) and Iris douglasiana var. oregonensis (R. C. Foster), but the species is highly variable and the varieties may not be well enough defined to be of much practical use. The Douglas Iris hybridizes freely with several other species; its natural hybrid with I. innominata has been designated as Iris ×thompsonii (R. C. Foster), and the garden hybrid with the same species as Iris ×aureonympha (E. H. English).

 

This plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society‘s Award of Garden Merit.[2]  — Wikipedia

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Previously in the Interesting Plant series: 

Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Lupine

Lupine

Lupine

Lupine flowers in Arlington Garden, Pasadena, CA 

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Yellow Tulips

Yellow Tulips

Yellow Tulips

More tulips, spotted at the grocery store nearby. They were so pretty I walked back as my wife checked out to grab this photo.

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Learn more about tulips with these books

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Camellia in my garden

Camellia in my garden

Camellia in my garden

I found this camellia bloom in the the garden yesterday. I spotted it out the back window, its red shining out against the dark green leaves.

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Noted: Gardening 101: Leucadendrons: Gardenista

A lovely family of plants worth knowing more about — Douglas
 

Read Gardening 101: Leucadendrons: Gardenista via Gardenista


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Field of Gold — A Minute in the Garden 56 from A Gardener’s Notebook [Video] (1:00)

A Minute in the Garden: A series from A Gardener’s Notebook

Flowers wave in the wind and bask in the sun at Arlington Garden, Pasadena, California.

Field of Gold -- A Minute in the Garden 56 from A Gardener's Notebook 

Music: “Concentration” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License 

See all the videos in “A minute in the garden” series in this YouTube playlist

 

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A new prickly pear paddle forms

A new prickly pear paddle forms

A new prickly pear paddle forms

The opuntia was showing new growth in Arlington Garden. These will soon become large paddles.

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Along the street

Along the street

Along the street

A neighbor’s garden brightens the street where I live. 

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Gardenista: The Definitive Guide to Stylish Outdoor Spaces [Book]

Gardenista: The Definitive Guide to Stylish Outdoor Spaces

I’m a subscriber and regular reader of the Gardenista blog, from where this book originates, so I am a bit surprised I hadn’t heard about it earlier. A quick trip to the web site of my local library and within minutes I had the book on my Kindle, ready for reading.

The introduction of Gardenista states,We believe gardens matter. So does your patio, your porch, your front stoop, or the sunny windowsill outside your apartment window. The proof is everywhere: treating the outdoors as a natural extension of living space makes you happier.” Perhaps this why I enjoy the blog so much. It matches much to my own philosophy. Even my imperfect little patch is often a source of joy, even if I wish it looked a bit tidier or flashy sometimes.

Gardenista is divided into several sections, including Thirteen Gardens We Love (And Why They Work), The Gardenista 100 — a resource guide of important products and links created by the writers — and much more. The book is artfully illustrated with appropriate and useful photos clearly showing the highlighted gardens and products and the examples they provide.

My favorite sections of the book included the wonderful look at Thirteen Gardens which take up a large section of the book. These excellent real-world examples are always one of my favorite ways to get new ideas for my own garden. For me, it is so much more useful to see ideas, plants and decor in actual use than carefully arranged in a garden show or in print. Each garden gives a detailed account of the best ideas from each garden and how you might use that idea in your own garden.

The Gardenista 100 is a great resource guide, containing some interesting products and sources so you can buy each for your very own. Sure some of them will be a tad too expensive for you and me, but perhaps we can locate more inexpensive alternatives while still making the best of the recommendations. My only fear with putting a resource guide into print these days is that it might quickly go out of date, rendering a significant portion of the book moot in a few years. That said, the ideas still stand as great examples, even if the particular products are no longer available.

The writing of Gardenista is accessible and portrays a love for gardening in all its forms — whether that be plants, hardscape, design or decor. Whether you are looking to improve your garden or your home, Gardenista is certainly worth a look and a read.

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Gardenista 1
 
Gardenista 2
 
Gardenista 3

A Splash of Yellow

A Splash of Yellow

A Splash of Yellow

Another unidentified plant/flower in Arlington Garden. It certainly made quite an impact shining brightly in the sunshine the day I visited.
Any ideas on this one folks?

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