From Gardening Don’ts (1913) by M.C. 08

From Gardening Don'ts (1913) by M.C. 08

DON’T say to those who
come to see your garden:
‘Ah, you should have been
here last week; I have never
seen such a blaze of colour.
Now, of course, everything is
over ;’ or (knowing they are
just going abroad), ‘If you
could only come in a fort-
night’s time, I should really
have something lovely to
show you.’

From Gardening Don'ts by M.C. 01

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Historical Seed Catalogs: Ferguson Seed Farms breed and grow pedigreed field seeds (1917) – 48 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Ferguson Seed Farms breed and grow pedigreed field seeds (1917) – 48 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Ferguson Seed Farms breed and grow pedigreed field seeds (1917) - 48 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Ferguson Seed Farms breed and grow pedigreed field seeds (1917) - 48 in a series

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Doing The Work
Investigation

1. Finding out the best varieties by actually testing them in our trial grounds, watching the reports of the Ex- periment Stations and gauging the general observations and experiences of farmers throughout the Southwest.

2. Finding out the better strains of these high-yielding standard varieties by growing them side by each.

3. Improving these better strains of these better varieties by plant-to-row tests — doing this painstaking and valuable work each and every season. This is the work that mak s our seeds yield bigger crops.

Supplying Seeds To You

4. We are growing seeds of these highly improved strains of these standard varieties.

5. We are preparing the seeds from these specially grown fields, assuming the responsibility for the success of every important step in the selection of the variety, select- ing the best strain in the variety, improving their good strains, as well as growing and preparing the seeds — all under our supervision, with practically trained specialists it charge of every step.

But Let Us Reason Together

With all this care our seeds are not yet perfect; they are “high bred,” but not absolutely “pure bred.” We are not promising you more than Old Mother Nature gives to us. In your fields, just the same as in ours along with your better yields and better average quality, you will get your share of runts, sports, throw-backs, reversions, etc. There’s a runt in every litter of even thoroughbred pigs; so in seeds.

When You Buy Our Seeds we want you to “feel,” as well as to believe, that your money is wisely invested in seeds that are well bred and honestly described. Of our sincerity in this we ask you to judge after reading our Stringless Guarantee.

 


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Dazzling Dahlias – 14 in a series – Dahlia via Michelle on Flickr

Dazzling Dahlias – 14 in a series – Dahlia via Michelle on Flickr

Dazzling Dahlias - 14 in a series - Dahlia via Michelle on Flickr

I bought a bunch of red and pink, red and white dahlias at the market yesterday. They are so stunning, they almost don’t look real!

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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Historical Garden Books – 59 in a series – The young gardener’s assistant (1835) by Thomas Bridgeman

Historical Garden Books – 59 in a series – The young gardener’s assistant (1835) by Thomas Bridgeman

Historical Garden Books - 59 in a series - The young gardener's assistant (1835) by Thomas Bridgeman

Historical Garden Books - 59 in a series - The young gardener's assistant (1835) by Thomas Bridgeman

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The object of this little work is to enable our respectable seedsmen, while they are furnishing a catalogue of seeds for the use of the Kitchen and Flower Garden, to afford instructions, at a trifling expense, to such of their customers as may not have a regular gardener, and thereby save themselves the blame of those who may not give their seeds a fair trial, for want of knowing bow to dispose of them in the ground.



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From Gardening Don’ts (1913) by M.C. 07

From Gardening Don'ts (1913) by M.C. 07

DON’T be too tidy
destroy the weeds but
let the flowers riot a bit.
Who can be more untidy
than Dame Nature ?

From Gardening Don'ts by M.C. 01

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Paper whites emerge after California spring rains via Instagram

Paper whites emerge after California spring rains

Paper whites emerge after California spring rains via Instagram

Here in California, spring starts when the winter rains come. The moment they do my bulbs spring into action throwing up new growth. These paper whites are always the first to emerge and offer the promise of many white flowers in just a week or so. They are quickly followed by the snowflakes and the daffodils planted around the garden.


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New growth on old rose via Instagram

New growth on old rose

New growth on old rose via Instagram

A few weeks ago, I trimmed back all my roses, as they had gone completely dormant. This is important to do every year as it stimulates growth right as we get the majority of our rain each year. I was happy to see that all the roses are now throwing off new growth like this. It just goes to show you that leaves can be beautiful too.


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Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 14 in a series – How To Care For Cotyledon Tomentosa – Bear’s Paw via Succulents Box

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 14 in a series – How To Care For Cotyledon Tomentosa – Bear’s Paw via Succulents Box

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 14 in a series - How To Care For Cotyledon Tomentosa - Bear's Paw via Succulents Box

Cotyledon tomentosa, or also known as Bear’s paw, is one of the most adorable members in the succulents family. It has a peculiar thick, ovate fuzzy green leaves with prominent dark red toothed edges that resemble the claws of a bear and velvety coating, this little fella does an awesome job in adding beautiful contrast and unique texture to any space. 

Bear’s paw has a low, shrub-like growing habitat that can reach over 30cm in height and usually produce a large orange bell-shaped flowers during spring. Although Cotyledon tomentosa is fairly easy to take care of, their leaves are quite fragile. So knowing how you can properly take care of them is a must.

Below are some tips on how you can properly care for your bear’s paw.

Read How To Care For Cotyledon Tomentosa – Bear’s Paw via Succulents Box

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Historical Seed Catalogs: Wood’s seeds Catalog (1919) – 47 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Wood’s seeds Catalog (1919) – 47 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Wood's seeds Catalog (1919) - 47 in a series Historical Seed Catalogs: Wood's seeds Catalog (1919) - 47 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Wood's seeds Catalog (1919) - 47 in a seriesHistorical Seed Catalogs: Wood's seeds Catalog (1919) - 47 in a series

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WOOD’S SEEDS

FORTIETH

ANNIVERSARY


THE YEAR 1919 celebrates the Fortieth Anniversary of the founding of the business of T. W. WOOD & SONS. Started in 1879 by Mr. T. W. Wood, in a very modest way, at the corner of Sixth and Marshall Streets, the business has gradually grown in volume and extent of territory covered each successive year, until today it ranks as one of the largest seed businesses in this country. Mr. T. W. Wood continued in the business up to the time of his death, in 1905.

Associated with their father from their early boyhood days were Mr. Henry W. Wood and Mr. William P. Wood, who still continue in active management of the business. In 1 892 Mr. Thomas Whittet was admitted to an interest in the firm, and has the active management of the Garden Seed Department. In later years Mr. Robert W. Wood and Mr. Gordon F. Wood, sons of Mr. Henry W. Wood, were admitted to an interest, and occupy important positions.

In addition to the members of the firm, we have a large number of employees who have been with us for a period of over twenty years, and whose valued help and experience have had no little part in the building up and the efficiency of our business.

This record of forty years’ continuous management gives a knowledge and experience in the seed business that has few parallels in this country.

Our general offices, main store and mail-order department and one of our shipping departments are located at Nos. 11, 13, 15 and 17 South Fourteenth Street. We also have branch retail stores at each of the markets, corner Sixth and Marshall and 1 707 East Franklin Street. In addition to this we occupy three other warehouses for storage and for our modern and up-to-date seed cleaning and elevator machinery. This, together with our Kenbrook and Williamson Seed Farms, gives us an equipment for the handling of our business that is not surpassed by any other seed house in this country.

Assuring our customers that we shall always endeavor to merit their continued and increased patronage, and with best wishes for the New Year, we remain,

Yours very truly,

T. W. WOOD & SONS.

Richmond, Va., January 1, 1919.


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Dazzling Dahlias – 14 in a series – Lover’s Walk by Thomas Hawk via Flickr

Dazzling Dahlias – 14 in a series – Lover’s Walk by Thomas Hawk via Flickr

Lover's Walk

Dazzling Dahlias - 14 in a series - Lover's Walk by Thomas Hawk via Flickr

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An interesting link found among my daily reading