Historical Seed Catalogs: Henderson’s flowers for American gardens (1921) – 32 in a series

Archive.org has a host of old seed catalogs (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Seed Catalogs: Henderson’s flowers for American gardens (1921) – 32 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Henderson's flowers for American gardens (1921) - 32 in a series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org

HENDERSON’S FLOWER SEEDS

Probably no outdoor occupation gives so much pleasure as the cultivation of flowers from seed. Starting with the tiny grains of seed, placing them carefully in suitable soil, watching the conditions of air and moisture while the seeds are nidden below the ground, and the gradual unfolding of the tiny seedling, and later the miraculous development of leaf, stem and branch until finally the fully grown plant bursts into glorious flower; this is the pleasure awaiting one who grows flowers from seed.


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A scene from the Orto Botanico in the Brera district of Milan via Instagram

What is your favorite botanic garden? Leave a comment and share!

A scene from the Orto Botanico in the Brera district of Milan

A scene from the Orto Botanico in the Brera district of Milan via Instagram

This was taken during my second visit to the botanic garden during our trip to Milan last September. I was on my own for the day and wanted to take some more photos. The mosquitos were ferocious, but I got some cool shots. 


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Dazzling Dahlias – 1 in a series – Dahlia ‘Margaret Haggo’

Dazzling Dahlias - 1 in a series

Dahlia ‘Margaret Haggo’ (Dahlia). This genus has upright and bushy, early summer and early autumn flowering, tuberous, deciduous annuals and perennials. They bear pinnatifid or pinnatisect, mid green leaves and disc-shaped flowers.

Credit: Bernard Spragg. NZ



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A scene from the Orto Botanico in the Brera district of Milan  via Instagram

What is your favorite plant? Leave a comment and share!

A scene from the Orto Botanico in the Brera district of Milan 

A scene from the Orto Botanico in the Brera district of Milan  via Instagram

This was taken during my second visit to the botanic garden during our trip to Milan last September. I was on my own for the day and wanted to take some more photos. The mosquitos were ferocious, but I got some cool shots. 


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Amaranth via Instagram

What is your favorite plant? Leave a comment and share!

Amaranth 

Amaranth via Instagram

A scene from the Orto Botanico in the Brera district of Milan

“Species belonging to the genus Amaranthus have been cultivated for their grains for 8,000 years. Amaranth plants are classified as pseudocereals that are grown for their edible starchy seeds, but they are not in the same botanical family as true cereals such as wheat and rice. Wikipedia”

This photo is from my second visit to the botanic garden during our trip to Milan last September. I was on my own for the day and wanted to take some more photos. The mosquitos were ferocious, but I got some cool shots. 


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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
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Historical Garden Books: Treatise culture of the dahlia and cactus by E. Sayers (1839) – 44 in a series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: Treatise culture of the dahlia and cactus by E. Sayers (1839) – 44 in a series

People have been writing about Dahlias for a long, long time! — Douglas

Historical Garden Books: Treatise culture of the dahlia and cactus by E. Sayers (1839) - 44 in a seriesHistorical Garden Books: Treatise culture of the dahlia and cactus by E. Sayers (1839) - 44 in a series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org

PREFACE.

The general desire manifested by the lovers of choice flowers to improve the beautiful tribes of the Dahlia and Cactus, has induced the writer to compile this little treatise. He does not pretend that the following pages are entirely original; he acknowledges his obligations to the late works of Paxton and M’Intosh, two of the most eminent floriculturists in Great Britain. So far, however, as these pages have any claim to originality, the compiler has drawn from an experience of no recent date in the general culture of flowers, during which he has paid particular attention to the Dahlia and Cactus. The favorable reception which, in the present enlightened state of horticulture, is extended to every consistent effort for the improvement of any of its departments, encourages him to send his little treatise to the press ; and that it may have a tendency to strengthen the impulse already prevalent in the culture of choice flowers is his earnest wish. May, 1839.



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Castor Bean Leaf (Ricinus communis) via Instagram

What is your favorite plant? Leave a comment and share!

Castor Bean Leaf (Ricinus communis)

Castor Bean Leaf (Ricinus communis) via Instagram

A scene from the Orto Botanico in the Brera district of Milan

While castor bean is a veritable weed here in Southern California in Europe they grow it as an ornamental. The leaves are quite large and structural, making a dramatic impact in the garden. 

This photo is from my second visit to the botanic garden during our trip to Milan last September. I was on my own for the day and wanted to take some more photos. The mosquitos were ferocious, but I got some cool shots. 


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What I’m Reading: The Garden Book of California (1906) – 4 in a series – “…the son of a poor country clergyman who had a small flower garden…”

What I'm Reading: The Garden Book of California (1906) - 4 in a series -

By Alexander Roslin – Nationalmuseum, Public Domain

“Linnaeus, the renowned Swedish botanist, was the son of a poor country clergyman who had a small flower garden in which he cultivated all the flowers which he could procure and his means would permit. From the earliest childhood of the son, he was taught to love and cultivate, and to rejoice with intense delight in the rich and varied colorings of the flowers, and in this way were created the tastes and desires which made Linnaeus the first botanist and naturalist of his age.”

What I'm Reading: The Garden Book of California (1906) - 1 in a series

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The Garden Book of California
Belle Sumner Angler



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Castor Bean Pods (Ricinus communis) via Instagram

What is your favorite plant? Leave a comment and share!

Castor Bean Pods (Ricinus communis)

Castor Bean Pods (Ricinus communis) via Instagram

A scene from the Orto Botanico in the Brera district of Milan

While castor bean is a veritable weed here in Southern California in Europe they grow it as an ornamental. I must admit the seed pods are quite structural and beautiful.

This photo is from my second visit to the botanic garden during our trip to Milan last September. I was on my own for the day and wanted to take some more photos. The mosquitos were ferocious, but I got some cool shots. 


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Sign up for the Gardener’s Notebook Mailing List



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

What I’m Reading: The Garden Book of California (1906) – 3 in a series – “…I wish to make a plea for a decorative plant too little used: the cactus.”

This new series is an ongoing collection of quotes from the books I am currently reading. — Douglas


See more cactus pictures and posts on A Gardener’s Notebook

”And now I wish to make a plea for a decorative plant too little used: the cactus. In the first place the cacti are a very purely American family and worthy of recognition as being among the “early settlers.” They have, like other “first families,” a peculiar and significant way of making their presence known in society, and yet with proper recognition of their merits there are no members of the floral world more genuinely full of delight for the plant lover than these same cacti.”

What I'm Reading: The Garden Book of California (1906) - 1 in a series

Download and Read this for FREE at Archive.org

The Garden Book of California
Belle Sumner Angler



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library