Historical Garden Books: The whole art of husbandry by J. (John) Mortimer (1721) – 39 in a Series

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of date, but you never know what you might find when you explore these catalogs. I’ll be sharing more catalogs as I find them in the coming weeks. –Douglas

Historical Garden Books: The whole art of husbandry: or, the way of managing and improving of land. Being a full collection of what hath been writ, either by ancient or modern authors: with many additions of new experiments and improvements not treated of by others. As also an account of the particular sorts of husbandry used in several counties; with proposals for its farther improvement. To which is added, the country-man’s kalendar. What he is to do every month in the year … by J. (John) Mortimer (1721) – 39 in a Series

Historical Garden Books:  The whole art of husbandry by J. (John) Mortimer (1721) - 39 in a Series

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The Art of Husbandry: Or,

Care in propagating of it, have at leaf!; prevented thofe that have had Opportunities of experiencing its Advantage from making that Dedrusion and general Spoil, that hath every whereof late been made of Woods, had they kept particular Accounts of the Profit, or been able to make a true Judgment of their own Advantage, which, I think, in mod: Places to exceed that of the Plough, or mod: other forts of Hulbandry j for I have my felf tranfplanted an Elm, that in twenty Years time had above twenty Foot of Timber in it, and mud: have had a great deal more had it not been tranfplanted > where the Soil and other Circumflances were proper for it : For without a due Confideration of Particulars, no great Advantage can be expedted from this, or any other fort of Hulbandry 5 and though Art may improve Nature, yet the forcing of it commonly requires more Cod: and Labour than will turn to the Advantage of the Undertaker. And therefore, as ’tis from an Application of fuch Things as are agreeable to each other, that Profit mud proceed, I ihall endeavour according to fuch Method, to give the bed Information I can, of fuch Things as may be mod for the Advantage and Incouragement of the Planter and Farmer.

 

 


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